Judge overturns California's ban on s...

Judge overturns California's ban on same-sex marriage

There are 201811 comments on the www.cnn.com story from Aug 4, 2010, titled Judge overturns California's ban on same-sex marriage. In it, www.cnn.com reports that:

A federal judge in California has knocked down the state's voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage, ruling Wednesday that the state's controversial Proposition 8 violates the U.S. Constitution.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at www.cnn.com.

“Vita e' Bella.”

Since: May 12

Location hidden

#222851 Oct 29, 2013
Frankie Rizzo wrote:
<quoted text>
Do you show the kids your great big telescope?
If Big D was real nice, and said please, he just might get an invite to the Vatican observatory.

http://www.vaticanobservatory.org/index.php/e...
In its historical roots and traditions the Vatican Observatory is one of the oldest astronomical institutes in the world. For the first foreshadowing of the Observatory can be traced to the constitution by Pope Gregory XIII of a committee to study the scientific data and implications involved in the reform of the calendar which occurred in 1582. The committee included Father Christoph Clavius, a Jesuit mathematician from the Roman College, who expounded and explained the reform. From that time and with some degree of continuity the Papacy has manifested an interest in and support for astronomical research. In fact, three early observatories were founded by the Papacy: the Observatory of the Roman College (1774-1878)(illustrated), the Observatory of the Capitol (1827-1870), and the Specula Vaticana (1789-1821) in the Tower of the Winds within the Vatican. These early traditions of the Observatory reached their climax in the mid-nineteenth century with the researches at the Roman College of the famous Jesuit, Father Angelo Secchi, the first to classify stars according to their spectra. With these rich traditions as a basis and in order to counteract the longstanding accusations of a hostility of the Church towards science, Pope Leo XIII in 1891 formally refounded the Specola Vaticana (Vatican Observatory) and located it on a hillside behind the dome of St. Peter's Basilica.

Several religious orders contributed personnel and directors to the Observatory. These included Barnabites, Oratorians, Augustinians, and Jesuits.


For a little more than four decades astronomical research, which included a prominent international program to map the whole sky, was carried out in the shadow of St. Peter's, but it eventually became obvious that the urban growth of the Eternal City was brightening the sky to such an extent that the fainter stars could no longer be studied.

Thus it was that Pope Pius XI provided a new location for the Observatory at the Papal Summer Residence at Castel Gandolfo [ illustrated ] in the Alban Hills some 25 kilometers southeast of Rome.

Father Angelo Secchi in the foreground is surrounded by (from leftbackground to right foreground) Pope Gregory XIII, Pope Leo XIII, and Pope Pius XI. Painting by Fantini.
It is here that the modern observatory, entrusted to the Jesuits, was refounded in the 1930s with the construction of two new telescopes, the installation of an astrophysical laboratory for spectrochemical analysis, and the expansion of several important research programs on variable stars. With the installation of a Schmidt wide-angle telescope in 1957 research was extended to other topics such as new techniques for the classification of stars according to their spectra. This is still an active program at the observatory and recalls the pioneering work of Angelo Secchi.

Since: Sep 13

Location hidden

#222852 Oct 29, 2013
Big D wrote:
correction...the moon is around 1.2 light seconds ( I dont know how I always say that wrong, not the first time )

It is like seeing a person use a hammer far away, the sight of it gets to you faster than the sound.

But the light also takes time, just over 186,282 miles a second.

The sun is
Kind of like lightning and thunder!!
Number 9

Azusa, CA

#222853 Oct 29, 2013
Are thee really that many idiots who post their nasty filth on this site?
Big D

Modesto, CA

#222854 Oct 29, 2013
Pietro Armando wrote:
<quoted text>
If Big D was real nice, and said please, he just might get an invite to the Vatican observatory.
http://www.vaticanobservatory.org/index.php/e...
In its historical roots and traditions the Vatican Observatory is one of the oldest astronomical institutes in the world. For the first foreshadowing of the Observatory can be traced to the constitution by Pope Gregory XIII of a committee to study the scientific data and implications involved in the reform of the calendar which occurred in 1582. The committee included Father Christoph Clavius, a Jesuit mathematician from the Roman College, who expounded and explained the reform. From that time and with some degree of continuity the Papacy has manifested an interest in and support for astronomical research. In fact, three early observatories were founded by the Papacy: the Observatory of the Roman College (1774-1878)(illustrated), the Observatory of the Capitol (1827-1870), and the Specula Vaticana (1789-1821) in the Tower of the Winds within the Vatican. These early traditions of the Observatory reached their climax in the mid-nineteenth century with the researches at the Roman College of the famous Jesuit, Father Angelo Secchi, the first to classify stars according to their spectra. With these rich traditions as a basis and in order to counteract the longstanding accusations of a hostility of the Church towards science, Pope Leo XIII in 1891 formally refounded the Specola Vaticana (Vatican Observatory) and located it on a hillside behind the dome of St. Peter's Basilica.
Several religious orders contributed personnel and directors to the Observatory. These included Barnabites, Oratorians, Augustinians, and Jesuits.
For a little more than four decades astronomical research, which included a prominent international program to map the whole sky, was carried out in the shadow of St. Peter's, but it eventually became obvious that the urban growth of the Eternal City was brightening the sky to such an extent that the fainter stars could no longer be studied.
Thus it was that Pope Pius XI provided a new location for the Observatory at the Papal Summer Residence at Castel Gandolfo [ illustrated ] in the Alban Hills some 25 kilometers southeast of Rome.
Father Angelo Secchi in the foreground is surrounded by (from leftbackground to right foreground) Pope Gregory XIII, Pope Leo XIII, and Pope Pius XI. Painting by Fantini.
It is here that the modern observatory, entrusted to the Jesuits, was refounded in the 1930s with the construction of two new telescopes, the installation of an astrophysical laboratory for spectrochemical analysis, and the expansion of several important research programs on variable stars. With the installation of a Schmidt wide-angle telescope in 1957 research was extended to other topics such as new techniques for the classification of stars according to their spectra. This is still an active program at the observatory and recalls the pioneering work of Angelo Secchi.
They have a very interesting telescope, not what you would call a normal one, really fast ( F stop )

Interesting to note the that one of the primary Originators of the expansion theories ( now called big bang ) was a Catholic Priest, proving that a moment of creation did happen as opposed to the steady state theory.

He turned out to be correct.

There was an instant of creation some 13 billion years ago.

The earth is a youngster compared to the universe, we are a second, possibly third generation system

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Lema%C3%...

Since: Sep 13

Location hidden

#222855 Oct 29, 2013
Number 9 wrote:
Are thee really that many idiots who post their nasty filth on this site?
What nasty filth?
Do you know why 6 was mad?
Because 7, 8 9.......

Since: Sep 13

Location hidden

#222856 Oct 29, 2013
Big D wrote:
<quoted text>They have a very interesting telescope, not what you would call a normal one, really fast ( F stop )

Interesting to note the that one of the primary Originators of the expansion theories ( now called big bang ) was a Catholic Priest, proving that a moment of creation did happen as opposed to the steady state theory.

He turned out to be correct.

There was an instant of creation some 13 billion years ago.

The earth is a youngster compared to the universe, we are a second, possibly third generation system

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Lema%C3%...
Very interesting!
dO nATTOR

Azusa, CA

#222857 Oct 29, 2013
Just ask for donations, they will give it to you?
Frankie Rizzo

Union City, CA

#222858 Oct 29, 2013
Big D wrote:
<quoted text>
They have a very interesting telescope, not what you would call a normal one, really fast ( F stop )
Interesting to note the that one of the primary Originators of the expansion theories ( now called big bang ) was a Catholic Priest, proving that a moment of creation did happen as opposed to the steady state theory.
He turned out to be correct.
There was an instant of creation some 13 billion years ago.
The earth is a youngster compared to the universe, we are a second, possibly third generation system
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Lema%C3%...
When I bring up poly MARRIAGE but you loudly complain it is off topic.
Big D

Modesto, CA

#222859 Oct 29, 2013
Cali Girl 13 wrote:
<quoted text>
Very interesting!
It is, surprised me to when I first learned that.

Einstein was arguing against him, but Einstein was wrong, and Lemaitre correct.

As I understood it, he lived just long enough ( like days before he died ) to learn that he was confirmed as correct.
Stop gap B ole S

Azusa, CA

#222860 Oct 29, 2013
October 29, 2013..

Glendora, California Officials Provide Water Conservation Update October 24, 2013 meeting?

What a baloney meeting that was, what wasn't told to the public was "a 7 year water conservation abuser" that the Chris Jeffers of the Glendora city hall has allowed to break the water conservation laws of the city of Glendora, California

So for anyone who has been threaten by a water conservation person of Rafael Perez can just tell them to stuff that tickets or warning notices back where the sun don't shine.

More lies coming from Glendora city hall. BS department.
Frankie Rizzo

Union City, CA

#222861 Oct 29, 2013
Pietro Armando wrote:
<quoted text>
If Big D was real nice, and said please, he just might get an invite to the Vatican observatory.
http://www.vaticanobservatory.org/index.php/e...
In its historical roots and traditions the Vatican Observatory is one of the oldest astronomical institutes in the world. For the first foreshadowing of the Observatory can be traced to the constitution by Pope Gregory XIII of a committee to study the scientific data and implications involved in the reform of the calendar which occurred in 1582. The committee included Father Christoph Clavius, a Jesuit mathematician from the Roman College, who expounded and explained the reform. From that time and with some degree of continuity the Papacy has manifested an interest in and support for astronomical research. In fact, three early observatories were founded by the Papacy: the Observatory of the Roman College (1774-1878)(illustrated), the Observatory of the Capitol (1827-1870), and the Specula Vaticana (1789-1821) in the Tower of the Winds within the Vatican. These early traditions of the Observatory reached their climax in the mid-nineteenth century with the researches at the Roman College of the famous Jesuit, Father Angelo Secchi, the first to classify stars according to their spectra. With these rich traditions as a basis and in order to counteract the longstanding accusations of a hostility of the Church towards science, Pope Leo XIII in 1891 formally refounded the Specola Vaticana (Vatican Observatory) and located it on a hillside behind the dome of St. Peter's Basilica.
Several religious orders contributed personnel and directors to the Observatory. These included Barnabites, Oratorians, Augustinians, and Jesuits.
For a little more than four decades astronomical research, which included a prominent international program to map the whole sky, was carried out in the shadow of St. Peter's, but it eventually became obvious that the urban growth of the Eternal City was brightening the sky to such an extent that the fainter stars could no longer be studied.
Thus it was that Pope Pius XI provided a new location for the Observatory at the Papal Summer Residence at Castel Gandolfo [ illustrated ] in the Alban Hills some 25 kilometers southeast of Rome.
Father Angelo Secchi in the foreground is surrounded by (from leftbackground to right foreground) Pope Gregory XIII, Pope Leo XIII, and Pope Pius XI. Painting by Fantini.
It is here that the modern observatory, entrusted to the Jesuits, was refounded in the 1930s with the construction of two new telescopes, the installation of an astrophysical laboratory for spectrochemical analysis, and the expansion of several important research programs on variable stars. With the installation of a Schmidt wide-angle telescope in 1957 research was extended to other topics such as new techniques for the classification of stars according to their spectra. This is still an active program at the observatory and recalls the pioneering work of Angelo Secchi.
Religious telescope BAD!!!
Big D

Modesto, CA

#222862 Oct 29, 2013
Cali Girl 13 wrote:
<quoted text>
Kind of like lightning and thunder!!
Exactly like that, yes.

but in astronomical terms, we are measuring the speed of light, rather than the speed of sound.

Sound = 768 miles an hour

Light is 186,282 miles a second

Some people can grasp this, others struggle with it, but the farther away we look, the farther back in time we are looking.
NE Jane

Pittsfield, MA

#222863 Oct 29, 2013
Frankie Rizzo wrote:
<quoted text>
Religious telescope BAD!!!
Heads up Frankie, my lil brother figured out a way to email a fart.
:o)
Frankie Rizzo

Union City, CA

#222864 Oct 29, 2013
I love it when a rainbow approved poster gets in a civil conversation with an unapproved poster, the approved poster gets good judge-its and the unapproved poster gets bad ones for the same conversation. Ah yes. Liberalism.

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Frankie Rizzo

Union City, CA

#222865 Oct 29, 2013
NE Jane wrote:
<quoted text>
Heads up Frankie, my lil brother figured out a way to email a fart.
:o)
The young lad doesn't approve of my retirement. Makes him mad. He has many issues about it. He thinks it's funny that I can't walk though. What a guy!

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“Vita e' Bella.”

Since: May 12

Location hidden

#222866 Oct 29, 2013
Big D wrote:
<quoted text>
They have a very interesting telescope, not what you would call a normal one, really fast ( F stop )
Interesting to note the that one of the primary Originators of the expansion theories ( now called big bang ) was a Catholic Priest, proving that a moment of creation did happen as opposed to the steady state theory.
He turned out to be correct.
There was an instant of creation some 13 billion years ago.
The earth is a youngster compared to the universe, we are a second, possibly third generation system
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Lema%C3%...
WAITAMINIT! Who are you, and where's the real Big D!? He would never acknowledge something like that.

Since: Sep 13

Location hidden

#222867 Oct 29, 2013
Frankie Rizzo wrote:
<quoted text>When I bring up poly MARRIAGE but you loudly complain it is off topic.
Let's change it to Astronomy!!! LOL

Since: Sep 13

Location hidden

#222868 Oct 29, 2013
Big D wrote:
<quoted text>Exactly like that, yes.

but in astronomical terms, we are measuring the speed of light, rather than the speed of sound.

Sound = 768 miles an hour

Light is 186,282 miles a second

Some people can grasp this, others struggle with it, but the farther away we look, the farther back in time we are looking.
I never ever knew that!

Since: Sep 13

Location hidden

#222869 Oct 29, 2013
Frankie Rizzo wrote:
I love it when a rainbow approved poster gets in a civil conversation with an unapproved poster, the approved poster gets good judge-its and the unapproved poster gets bad ones for the same conversation. Ah yes. Liberalism.
That is too funny!

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10

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Number 9

Azusa, CA

#222870 Oct 29, 2013
Did yeah hear, they are rebuilding the tracks for number 9.

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