PUSD, the city's biggest landlord, lo...

PUSD, the city's biggest landlord, looks to property to plug budget...

There are 34 comments on the Pasadena Star-News story from Aug 26, 2010, titled PUSD, the city's biggest landlord, looks to property to plug budget.... In it, Pasadena Star-News reports that:

The Pasadena Unified School District has dusted off a 20-year-old plan that cashes in on its most valuable asset: land.

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CableNewsGuy

Pasadena, CA

#21 Aug 27, 2010
PUSD DAD wrote:
<quoted text>you posed alot of questions for which you had no answer as proof of the pusd's ignorance and imcompetence. if that is your answer, i am not convinced. instead of going after my kids' school district to balance the budget and cure the ills of society, why not advocate slashing the defense budget or social security? if you want to go after those unjustly getting rich at the hands of the common man, try oil, banking, healthcare or pharmacuetical companies versus teachers. look at the objective info, the pusd is improving. a little land sell off now during a time of deep economic crisis does not prove the district its run by imcompetents that may have mistimed the real estate market, and your thesis that the world is worse now that the good old days you fondly remember.
You still haven't addressed the points I made about their mismanagement. Using twenty year old plan? Rules for declaring surplus prior to lease and or sale? Restriction of sales value? Contracting out to experts who know how to make money? These are legitimate concerns if it was your property.

I know, I know. We are dealing with other peoples money (the taxpayers). You knowledge class guys don't worry about such things until you run out of money. Let me tell, they are broke, put on your worry beads.
dreyespasadena

AOL

#22 Aug 27, 2010
Pasadena Unified School District should not move its headquarters at Del Mar & Hudson to a different location. When I started school at the start of 1976, one elementary school, located at Lincoln and Peoria was closed and sold to the US Post Office, Pasadena region, where is now located. In 2006, Audubon, Edison, Linda Vista, Noyes, and Allendale elementary schools closed its doors, only Edison and Noyes are converted into charter schools, while Allendale is used for Blair's middle school students while the new middle school is under construction. The PUSD needs to raise money to balance the budget and market the district to all families.
PUSD DAD

Glendale, CA

#23 Aug 27, 2010
what do you say proves your point?
PUSD DAD

Glendale, CA

#24 Aug 27, 2010
CableNewsGuy wrote:
<quoted text>
You still haven't addressed the points I made about their mismanagement. Using twenty year old plan? Rules for declaring surplus prior to lease and or sale? Restriction of sales value? Contracting out to experts who know how to make money? These are legitimate concerns if it was your property.
I know, I know. We are dealing with other peoples money (the taxpayers). You knowledge class guys don't worry about such things until you run out of money. Let me tell, they re broke, put on your worry beads.
where does it say that anyone is handcuffed to a 20 year old plan?
DShelley

Anaheim, CA

#25 Aug 27, 2010
DShelley wrote:
<quoted text>
TF,
One of the elementary schools in Covina Valley (Barranca, I believe) had a Best Buy and shopping Center go up right next to them. They worked out a sweet deal where Best Buy not only agreed to route their parking lot with the school in mind, but also donated a beautiful park- like playground and pick-up area that routed the students away from their traffic. Win/Win!! Why can't we figure something like this out!?
Correction, I do believe that IKEA was the actual store that worked this deal. I visited this school a few years ago as they HAD BEEN a low performing, sort of run-down school and had become a much improved school with a BEAUTIFUL multimedia room with a multi-station computer lab (Mac-based like me!)/library and resource center. The school was absolutely vibrant on the day I was there. I couldn't believe that this school was a predominately minority school. PUSD was pissed off that I had used my BTSA (beginning teacher) observation day to visit a school outside of the district. I wanted to observe a low income school that was upgrading and having success. I wanted to know how they did it. I was NEVER interested in learning how to achieve success by placing all the "bad kids" in schools on one side of town, while encouraging the parents of the "good kids" to send their kids to the "choice schools" - the PUSD way!

I wanted to bring back what I saw and maybe help bring some of it to MY district. No interest on the part of PUSD. PUSD is too entrenched in their supporting the east while sacrificing the west mentality.

I wonder if anyone who says that Jackson Elementary school couldn't handle a Target next door has been to New York City, San Franciso, or even our own downtown L.A? Seriously, does our school board really think that schools can't exist in an urban setting? What about good old McKinley sitting there just a few hundred yards away from Lake and all those really big buildings with lots and lots of cars and lots and lots of people?
DShelley

Anaheim, CA

#26 Aug 27, 2010
p*i*s*s*e*d (off)
Are you kidding me?

Since: Apr 10

Location hidden

#27 Aug 27, 2010
True Freedom wrote:
I'd prefer they sold Wilson Middle School.
But, don't pile up a bunch of apartments over by Muir.
Pasadena is already overcrowded. We don't need room for more.
Why, just because you don't want "those people" in your neighborhood?
True Freedom

Pasadena, CA

#28 Aug 27, 2010
Jingshen wrote:
<quoted text>Why, just because you don't want "those people" in your neighborhood?
I'm half kidding, but it's no real secret that I'm not a fan of Wilson Middle and the problems it brings to the surrounding community. Trash, disruptive kids, school ditchers with the occasional drug use, vandalism, even a few break-ins. Additionally, the staff is apathetic to the impacts on the community. Many of us have spoken with them many times and got nothing but attitude or lip service.

The grounds keepers don't seem to think picking up cups and chip bags in the front lawn, removing beer bottles along the side, or doing something about abandoned shopping carts on the property are part of their union negotiated contract.

During the summer months, it can be a place for delinquents to loiter unsupervised.

The sports teams, however, have done quite a good job cleaning up their act after many discussions with league reps.. so kudos to them.
Students and Teachers

Pasadena, CA

#29 Aug 27, 2010
Don't sell the property, they're assists the district is fortunate to own. Lease the property to the private sector and take that money and invest in the students and teachers.
Reduce the size of district management (remember, it's about the students and teachers).
If any PUSD Board members are receiving financial compensation for their service...they should resign. The PUSD Board should be made up of the finest minds who consider students and teachers as priority number one ...not career politicians using the PUSD as a stepping stone.
pas

Los Angeles, CA

#30 Sep 10, 2010
I think its interesting people are discussing this as if somehow the context is just business as usual. do we remember the budget deficit? i dont think pusd 'wants' to sell its property, but it wants less to be taken over by the state. pasadena residents should share those priorities, especially given its rejection of the parcel tax, which, of course, is probably one of the reasons this is being discussed at all.

i also dont think the analogy is to taking a second mortgage to go on vacation or to buy an extra or fancy car, rather its probably more like taking a second mortgage so you can pay your utilities.

i agree on the concern related to staffing numbers. this is something i've been trying to get pusd to justify for a while now, however, i will point out that total classified salary expenditures was about $31M in 08-09. thats total (and probably will equal pusd's deficit for the 3 year window starting last or the previous year). and its about 35% of total certificated salaries. in addition, classified benefits are significantly lower than certificated ones. so if you're looking for pusd's budget shortfall to somehow be rectified by trimming even more classified staff, i think you will be waiting a long time..
pas

Los Angeles, CA

#31 Sep 10, 2010
DShelley wrote:
<quoted text>
I wonder if anyone who says that Jackson Elementary school couldn't handle a Target next door has been to New York City, San Franciso, or even our own downtown L.A? Seriously, does our school board really think that schools can't exist in an urban setting? What about good old McKinley sitting there just a few hundred yards away from Lake and all those really big buildings with lots and lots of cars and lots and lots of people?
i would question whether pasadena residents would want pasadena to look like nyc, sf or downtown la. in addition, some people choose to pay a premium to live in what would otherwise be considered an 'inefficient' environment. some examples of this kind of 'inefficiency' in pasadena and surrounding areas include: wide streets, sidewalks, single family dwellings surrounded by excess land (yards), etc.
there is a concerted effort to rid us of this inefficiency, with potentially disastrous side-effects imho. most examples of this kind of 'progress' have pitted efficiency directly against quality of life, which is not ok, imho. putting an ikea or big lots or home depot or walmart at hudson and del mar would be a disaster imho. infrastructurally, it might be more doable on woodbury, but there are a lot of people who walk to that school from what I understand, and quite frankly, im not sure it would solve more problems than it creates.

mckinley's traffic situation works (i guess you could say that), but to the extent it does it's not because of its proximity to lake street, rather in spite of that, and due more to the proximity of some low-volume, mostly residential streets, and traffic reduction efforts in nearby areas (including lake).
Still in business

Pasadena, CA

#32 Sep 10, 2010
"This is not the ideal thing we want in our community," he said of Big Box. "We would support apartment buildings."

Only at market rate. Homeowners would prefer big box to section 8 housing. Are they mad?
DShelley

North Hollywood, CA

#33 Sep 11, 2010
pas wrote:
<quoted text>
i would question whether pasadena residents would want pasadena to look like nyc, sf or downtown la. in addition, some people choose to pay a premium to live in what would otherwise be considered an 'inefficient' environment. some examples of this kind of 'inefficiency' in pasadena and surrounding areas include: wide streets, sidewalks, single family dwellings surrounded by excess land (yards), etc.
there is a concerted effort to rid us of this inefficiency, with potentially disastrous side-effects imho. most examples of this kind of 'progress' have pitted efficiency directly against quality of life, which is not ok, imho. putting an ikea or big lots or home depot or walmart at hudson and del mar would be a disaster imho. infrastructurally, it might be more doable on woodbury, but there are a lot of people who walk to that school from what I understand, and quite frankly, im not sure it would solve more problems than it creates.
mckinley's traffic situation works (i guess you could say that), but to the extent it does it's not because of its proximity to lake street, rather in spite of that, and due more to the proximity of some low-volume, mostly residential streets, and traffic reduction efforts in nearby areas (including lake).
I wasn't advocating that we become NYC - only that having a store nearby doesn't make for a failing school. There isn't much of a neighborhood around the district Service Center - mostly the freeway and commercial. Neighborhood children walking to school would all be coming from the same side of the street that the school is on. They would have no reason to cross over.

One of the highest scoring elementary schools in the district, Willard, is right there in one of the busiest parts of east Pasadena, blocks away from Rosemead and Colorado (and a Target!).

The PUSD can pretend to "think" about what schools they are going to close, but they WILL be closing Jackson. They've barely invested a dime there in years. They want that low-scoring school to crash and burn and have been doing everything possible to hasten its demise.(But, of course, we all know its the teachers' fault - damn them!)
Greg

Diamond Bar, CA

#34 Sep 14, 2010
Jackson does not have a great reputation,except for Math field day, as I remember every year they win several medals. I am sure the district doesn't care one bit about what the parents over there have to say, their mind is made up.

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