San Lorenzo River gets shot of new fi...

San Lorenzo River gets shot of new fish to boost local runs

There are 34 comments on the Santa Cruz Sentinel story from Apr 2, 2009, titled San Lorenzo River gets shot of new fish to boost local runs. In it, Santa Cruz Sentinel reports that:

The Ford F-450 slowly backed up to the river. The diesel engine revved as the tires dug for traction in the soft sand and, above, the flat bed of the truck shuddered beneath the weight of a small aquarium.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Santa Cruz Sentinel.

First Prev
of 2
Next Last
down the street

Santa Cruz, CA

#23 Apr 2, 2009
Thank you for trying to help. All people seem to do is complain. These fish are sacred.I'm sure if the anwaswas were here the Ohlone people would say Thanks for caring may the Great Spirt bless you.
Coulrophobia

Alviso, CA

#24 Apr 2, 2009
Phil wrote:
<quoted text>
Hi Planting, stocking Loch Lomond doesn't increase fish populations anywhere but Loch Lomond. It's not connected to local waterways in any normal fashion. In fact, its only connection to local waterways is that water is pumped into it from the San Lorenzo. There's a dam at the pumping station, but there's also a fish ladder. The water is used as part of the water supply for the city of Santa Cruz. Stocking Loch Lomond was strictly for the fishermen. I don't know if removing water from the San Lorenzo is contributing to the decline of the Steelhead. I think they could manage it to have little or no effect.
For those who think septic runoffs are polluting the river, please note that the pumping station for Loch Lomond is in Felton, near the bridge to Henry Cowell. This is downriver from practically the entire San Lorenzo Valley. That river water is in the Loch Lomond reservoir, and the fish there have always thrived. And Santa Cruzans drink it.
I've seen sudsy runoff during the rains. I don't know what causes it, but I'm pretty sure there's a natural reason. I've seen it coming off a redwood tree. I know several plants, like ceanothus, which give off a sudsy residue when washed. I think the water supply is pretty good.
I hate to say it, but it looks like the main problem may have been how we used to dam up the river to make swimming holes. Without fish ladders, steelhead were having trouble getting upstream. Now that we've stopped that practice, maybe we'll see populations increase. I hate to lose them, but the pool at the high school is good (except for the chlorine) and cheap.
Good points. I'm wondering where the SL River water is clear enough to get the photos that accompanied this article. Anyone know where these fish are released?

I've seen sudsy water come off of trees, but I've also seen it come off of newer pavement. Some of the asphalt sealers and slurry mixtures release a sudsing substance when water hits them -- and they do it for a long time. Street runoff is a major polluter fro waterways.
mbj

Santa Cruz, CA

#25 Apr 2, 2009
There is actually lots of research about the SLR and its problems in the context of the steelhead run. Do a little Google searching and you can learn alot. One major issue is the lack of a lagoon at the river mouth because of the parking lot there for the Boardwalk. When the smolts float downstream heading for the ocean, then need time to make the adjustment from fresh to salt water. Back when there was a big brackish lagoon with plenty of cover to keep the temperature moderated and to provide protection from birds and other predators this was the place for the little guys to get prepared for life in the ocean. Without that, the mortality rates for outgoing fish have gone way up. There was a suit going on for years to get the lagoon reinstated.

Again if you would like to get educated, type "san lorenzo river lagoon suit" into your favorite search engine.
long time valleyite

San Jose, CA

#27 Apr 2, 2009
dubious wrote:
Dam removal in the San Lorenzo? You can dump fish in a river, but that doesn't make it viable habitat. Only when policy makers get serious about environmental protection will the river ever be able to support viable runs of salmonids. That will take a lot of $, political spine, and decades (or more?) of restoration...As a society, are we ready to go there? Otherwise, why waste the resources for a half- as sed effort?
This article also says decades ago there were 10,000 fish spawning, and decades ago, the Ben Lomond dam was up!! Can we please have the dam back?
scott

Santa Cruz, CA

#28 Apr 2, 2009
I am concerned about Salmonid survival and agree that lagoons play a critical role in their life cycle. Other arguments regarding water pollution and predation are probably valid. Anyone consider the impacts from farming, logging, or other rural activity in the watershed?
From Santa Cruz

Santa Clara, CA

#29 Apr 2, 2009
dubious wrote:
Otherwise, why waste the resources for a half- as sed effort?
Simply put, the majority of fishing license fees go towards fish planting. The money is specifically collected and put aside for this.
From Santa Cruz

Santa Clara, CA

#30 Apr 2, 2009
Also there is an excise tax on fishing and hunting equipment that pays for this kind of stuff as well. Don't worry, it's not coming out of your income tax or car registration. Next time you see a hunter or fisherman, thank them for all the money they personally spend to preserve our wildlife habitats.
Silva

Barrigada, Guam

#33 Apr 2, 2009
mbj wrote:
There is actually lots of research about the SLR and its problems in the context of the steelhead run. Do a little Google searching and you can learn alot. One major issue is the lack of a lagoon at the river mouth because of the parking lot there for the Boardwalk. When the smolts float downstream heading for the ocean, then need time to make the adjustment from fresh to salt water. Back when there was a big brackish lagoon with plenty of cover to keep the temperature moderated and to provide protection from birds and other predators this was the place for the little guys to get prepared for life in the ocean. Without that, the mortality rates for outgoing fish have gone way up. There was a suit going on for years to get the lagoon reinstated.
Again if you would like to get educated, type "san lorenzo river lagoon suit" into your favorite search engine.
Pre CEQA, in 1955 the ACOE dramatically altered the habitate from the sea up to highway 1. If that was attemtped today, I assume the approach would be much different with more empahsis on habitat protection. The other major decision was dictated by Madri Wormhoudt who would not allow a sewer collection system installation in the upper reaches of the SLV beacuse she thought it would encourage more development. She essentially sancted septic system runooff into the River.

The River is sick at best and will never return to anything close to its optimum. Sorry kids.
Show me the money

AOL

#34 Apr 2, 2009
Nay wrote:
Regardless of all the other 'issues' that picture of all the fish coming out of the hose is pretty cool.
Yeah, like sperm heading for diseased ova. And this "stimulus" money will stimulate our economy like how????
Dam Lover

Bangkok, Thailand

#35 Oct 20, 2009
long time valleyite wrote:
<quoted text>
This article also says decades ago there were 10,000 fish spawning, and decades ago, the Ben Lomond dam was up!! Can we please have the dam back?
Yes! Build a fish ladder if you have to but the dam in Ben Lomond was a huge part of the comunity. When it died, the town shrank. Bring it back!
chetcocliff

Crescent City, CA

#36 Dec 14, 2010
poster wrote:
<quoted text>
Sea lions and steelhead have been co-existing for hundreds if not thousands of years. Sea lions are NOT the problem.
The Native Tribes of the Pacific Coast used sea lion and harbor seals for food and clothing. These animals had a healthy respect for man who would gladly club them while sleeping on the rocks, spear them, trap them, kill them whenever possible.
chetcocliff

Crescent City, CA

#37 Dec 14, 2010
Native tribesmen would kill sealions, and harbor seals for food and clothing whenever possible. These animals had a healthy respect for man and would keep there distance. As they were trapped, clubbed, and killed regularly.
fish

Santa Cruz, CA

#38 Jun 8, 2013
I saw tons of baby fish under the bridge by the courthouse of santa cruz in the san lorenzo river. I have no idea what type but i think rainbow trout! Hopefully they survive
Joel

Santa Clara, CA

#39 Dec 25, 2013
Jim wrote:
The sea lions are devastating to these fish.....they will go up to Felton to hammer the jueveniles. The weeds and fallen trees are good. The trolls don't help though.
Sea lions in felton, lol, tourist...

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 2
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

San Lorenzo Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
District Attorney Investigator 3 hr Jeff_Kenn 1
Russia Buys Hat Jockstraps 10 hr Trumpinsky Itch 1
News Doctor heads to court after online sex sting (Nov '06) Thu Brittle Fingers 17,272
Donald Trump will control the blacks Wed blacklives 8
News The 25 Most Dangerous Cities in the U.S. Are Mo... (Nov '10) Wed stupid republicans 20,391
News Solano County District attorney announces settl... Jul 25 IdolHanz 1
Empty Hat Brigade to Run Country Keep Out All! Jul 21 no curry for mom 1

San Lorenzo Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

San Lorenzo Mortgages