Officials unveil new plan to save, restore sea

Mar 31, 2007 Full story: Desert Sun 35

“We'd have to drive a long ways to get to some water.”

While far from complete, the draft proposal state officials released Tuesday is the first glance at what's being considered the best chance to save and restore the Salton Sea. via Desert Sun

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gary reagles

United States

#1 Apr 2, 2007
How nice is that proposal? All the sea is in Riverside County so they can fatten their coffers and claim all the tourism that wants a desert Sea. The Torres-Martinez indians have been left out by the politics once again. As a Salton City resident, I don;t want a canal in front of my home. I want the Sea that is here now!!! thankyou
Salton City Resident

United States

#2 Apr 12, 2007
That is a horrible plan!!! The Salton Sea has the potential to be such an amazing synergistic oasis of beauty, recreation and development for not only the Desert Communities (both in Imperial County and Riverside) but also for Californians in general, and these "officials" are wanting to reduce it and chop it up into absurdity?! All we need to do is get the water levels back to where they used to do and keep it clean. Let's let it become the resource it was meant to be and stop with all the nonsense!!
Worth Saving

San Bernardino, CA

#3 Apr 19, 2007
This is the worst possible solution! If you want to preview exactly what it will look like, just pay a visit to OWENS LAKE (dry) in the southern Sierras. In the mid to late 1800's this too was an enormous lake with large ships that transported mined ore across the lake to the railhead. What's left of OWENS LAKE is just what the Salton Sea will look like. Oh, by the way. If your going to visit OWENS LAKE, be sure to do it when the wind is blowing. That will give you some small indication of just what it will look like down here. Why do we spend millions of our tax dollars on MONO LAKE, a completely worthless body of water, just to save a few seagull eggs from the coyotes, and let the Salton Sea, once one of he largest tourist attractions in this state, fall into ruin. GO FIGGER! FIX IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!
Worth Saving

San Bernardino, CA

#4 Apr 19, 2007
As a necessary followup, there's a very good prospect that in the near future thousands of new residents will be moving into the Salton Sea area. Unfortunately, due to the irresponsible actions (or lack thereof)of the Salton Community Services District, they have not made any effort to keep the existing sewage treatment facilities ahead of, or even up with, the current influx of new construction. At the present time, the County of Imperial has stopped issuing new building permits and has recinded all issued building permits currently under construction because there is not enough sewage treatment capacity to even handle the residents currently living under their jurisdiction. Perhaps it's time a grand jury looked into the dealings of the SCSD. There's a lot of strange things going on there. How come I haven't seen any public outcry about this situation? Is the media not aware of it?
dash-dewey

United States

#5 Apr 19, 2007
Worth Saving wrote:
This is the worst possible solution! If you want to preview exactly what it will look like, just pay a visit to OWENS LAKE (dry) in the southern Sierras. In the mid to late 1800's this too was an enormous lake with large ships that transported mined ore across the lake to the railhead. What's left of OWENS LAKE is just what the Salton Sea will look like. Oh, by the way. If your going to visit OWENS LAKE, be sure to do it when the wind is blowing. That will give you some small indication of just what it will look like down here. Why do we spend millions of our tax dollars on MONO LAKE, a completely worthless body of water, just to save a few seagull eggs from the coyotes, and let the Salton Sea, once one of he largest tourist attractions in this state, fall into ruin. GO FIGGER! FIX IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!
Mono Lake, if I'm correct, is in the Sierra Nevada's right? It was drained dry, because Los Angeles wanted water, no matter where it came from. I use to live up in that area near Yosemite, years ago. The locals were pretty upset by that. My aunt, who lived in Wyoming,used to talk about California wanting to divert Wyoming's water down to California. And she was upset by that. I hate to say it, but zero growth for a few years might solve the problem. I don't know. I'm not one of those save the earth people, but water,especially clean water, will some day be hard to come by. But what burns me, is the politicians trying to get their hand on all the water and create a monopoly that the rest of us, just like gas and oil, will have to pay dearly for.
Worth Saving

San Bernardino, CA

#6 Apr 20, 2007
dash-dewey wrote:
<quoted text>Mono Lake, if I'm correct, is in the Sierra Nevada's right? It was drained dry, because Los Angeles wanted water, no matter where it came from. I use to live up in that area near Yosemite, years ago. The locals were pretty upset by that. My aunt, who lived in Wyoming,used to talk about California wanting to divert Wyoming's water down to California. And she was upset by that. I hate to say it, but zero growth for a few years might solve the problem. I don't know. I'm not one of those save the earth people, but water,especially clean water, will some day be hard to come by. But what burns me, is the politicians trying to get their hand on all the water and create a monopoly that the rest of us, just like gas and oil, will have to pay dearly for.
The lake that is dry is Owens Lake. Mono Lake is way full. Both are in the Sierras, and the water was depleted from Owens Lake for the City of Los Angeles.

Mono Lake is a dead lake with no fish but billions upon billions of brine flies. Water was diverted into Mono Lake to close a land bridge to an island where the seagulls nested. The Sierra Club (yuck) was upset because coyotes were using the land bridge to gain access to the nesting site and eat seagull eggs.(Like we'd miss a few seagulls). It amazes me how a few influential people can complain about a few eggs being eaten and have millions upon millions of tax dollars spent to mitigate their whims, but no one seems to want to spend the money to save one of the greatest wildlife resources in California. Shame on them!
dash-dewey

United States

#7 Apr 20, 2007
after reading the article, I think it should just be a lake, and no houses built around it. Let it be a tourist attraction. or whatever. California has some of the prettiest places to just watch the wildlife. the tide pools at Monterrey are fantastic. It's amazing what is in our oceans. Our politicians here want to build another lake.And we already have two man made lakes between us. They want to put another one in the middle, so the wealthy can build their homes along the shore. The ones who make out are the developers. Raw sewage is dumped into the lakes and no one seems to care. Companies around here dump their chemicals and what not into the back swamps and bayous, thinking no one will know. I think there has to be some kind of balance that will make everyone happy. Let me know how every thing turns out.
wrenchhand9

United States

#8 Apr 24, 2007
Who thought up these plans?They really suck.What happens to the businesses that rely on income of fishermen/women and boating enthusiasts?It seems to me yet again,Riverside County will prosper,while Imperial County gets the sh%ty end of the stick.The Sea hasn't dried up enough yet as to where it was back in the Sixty or Seventies.
Why can't a Desalinization Plant be installed, sell the salt for deicing the roads back East,clean up the rim and if usable,sell as fertilizer? Restock the Sea with the fish that thrived in the Sea for decades until the Tilapia took over!
We want our Sea back!We did not ruin it.Go after those that did and let them aide in restoring OUR Sea. 17 miles wide and 35 miles long.Go Back To The Drawing Board And Restore Our Sea!
wrenchhand9

United States

#9 Apr 24, 2007
Post Script... Looke up the word RESTORE. Maybe that will give you a hint oe what the wor means.
Worth Saving

Ontario, CA

#10 Apr 26, 2007
You've got it exactly right! Restore the sea to what it was 30 years ago....and maintain it. What about that great environmental group the "Sierra Club"? I haven't heard a word from them about saving the sea; the fish; bird life; wildlife; the environment....NOTHING! They could at least make as much to-do out of it as they did for MONO LAKE (That worthless piece of real estate!) Come on you Sierra Clubers, let's hear from you. Or is it not "politically Correct"; or is it because it's not popular, or doesn't get the right people the votes. The redwoods are safe, the spotted owl is rebounding, we do have global climate change (a natural change, by the way), so unless you're too busy with GOREbal warming, how about doing something positive for a change.
dash-dewey

United States

#11 Apr 28, 2007
Worth Saving wrote:
You've got it exactly right! Restore the sea to what it was 30 years ago....and maintain it. What about that great environmental group the "Sierra Club"? I haven't heard a word from them about saving the sea; the fish; bird life; wildlife; the environment....NOTHING! They could at least make as much to-do out of it as they did for MONO LAKE (That worthless piece of real estate!) Come on you Sierra Clubers, let's hear from you. Or is it not "politically Correct"; or is it because it's not popular, or doesn't get the right people the votes. The redwoods are safe, the spotted owl is rebounding, we do have global climate change (a natural change, by the way), so unless you're too busy with GOREbal warming, how about doing something positive for a change.
I'm so glad that there still people out there that still believe these cycles the earth goes through are natural. I'm araid your salton sea is going to have to be saved by you unsung heroes out there, that don't rely on politics or such. But, the more noise you make, maybe, someone will start listening.

Since: Apr 07

Salton City

#12 Jul 28, 2007
To Arms for all those that want to save the Salton Sea to be RESTORED, not modified!
It is time to get involved and it is easy;
1.) Contact Barbara Boxer and Diane Feinstein along with your perspective Senator.
2.) Contact you Congressperson, ours is Mr. Bob Filner.
3.) Contact your Assy. Person's, ours is Bonnie Garcia.
4.) Contact The Army Corps Of Engineers before they adopt this plan.
5.) Contact Gov.Arnold Schwarzenegger, and the Government Office of Interior.
It is getting down to the wire now. It is time to flood them with your concerns to Restore the Salton Sea and most of all not to Modify her. After all it is now at the age of being a Historical Landmark and it wouldn't be a bad idea to contact the Historical Society. Let your voices be heard all across the land.
Get busy, it doesn't take that lone to write a letter and Cc. to all the above and whoever else YOU can think of. It's your voice and our Sea that can make this work.
The Timing is perfect,the time is NOW!

“All power to the people.”

Since: Mar 07

San Diego, CA

#13 Jul 28, 2007
I have an idea. San Diego dumps over 100 million gallons of treated water 5 miles out into the ocean every day. Why not send that water over the mountains in the east county, generate a little electricity, irrigate some crops and let the rest flow into the Salton Sea. There is also LA treated water.
Nellie McConnell

United States

#14 Aug 7, 2007
I have lived at Salton Sea for over 20 years. It is the most beautiful and peaceful place I have ever lived. The beauty of the desert and having the sea at my door step is amazing. I can't see anything but total restoration. This could be the most profitable body of water in the U.S.A. When I moved here the water was clear and the fishing was greaat. I can be that again and better. Imperial County should have equal amount for receration as Riverside County,. If this body of water is not restored it will affect the whole valley from Banning to Imperial. There will not be a house or any property worth much as the wind and the smell will cause the property to lose value. The farmers will suffer also because no one will want to live here. It will be another Momo Lake situation. Get on board and SAVE THE SEA!!!! Enjoy the SEA! WHY GO TO COLORADO RIVER? WE HAVE A BEAUTIFUL SEA HERE!
Nellie McConnell
3783 Capri Lane
Desert Shores, CA 92274

Since: Jun 07

Hemet, California

#15 Aug 10, 2007
I am going to sound like a complete MORON here, but here it goes (just be easy with comments please..) What is wrong with the Salton Sea that it needs to be restored? I have lived in So. Cal all my life but never been around to see anything.(I watched the movie though...:) Is it like another Lake Skinner where families can go and play and swim or what?

“All power to the people.”

Since: Mar 07

San Diego, CA

#16 Aug 10, 2007
This is nuts wrote:
I am going to sound like a complete MORON here, but here it goes (just be easy with comments please..) What is wrong with the Salton Sea that it needs to be restored? I have lived in So. Cal all my life but never been around to see anything.(I watched the movie though...:) Is it like another Lake Skinner where families can go and play and swim or what?
It was created by "accident" in its present form. Since that happened it was developed and became integral to wildlife migration patterns.

The problem is there is no natural replenishment and the runoff from farms goes untreated into the lake. This runoff is very "polluted" with fertilizers and salts. It is currently shrinking and becoming more and more salty.

At one time you could swim in it and fish with no problem. There was actually a lot of shoreline development going on.

If you go there now, it's still impressive but stinky. It continues to shrink. There are a lot of developments that are no more than streets and lots with no houses.

In my mind the best restoration is a consistent supply of new water not splitting it in two to create a "clean" and a "dirty" party.
swreview

United States

#17 Aug 28, 2007
QUESTION: currently, how dangerous is the Salton Sea's polluted water/air to respiratory concerns of residents living near it? Also, how deep is the Salton Sea?

BIG PICTURE? I read in your state's technical information that the big earthquake may start underneath the Salton Sea.

Is it possible that there is a hidden blessing in this body of water "shrinking," i.e., that the entire Coachella Valley will not be flooded? The stench driving people away would also protect them, should that catastrophe occur.

I surely agree with comments above about its earlier wonderful years--it is hard to lose something as great as a seaside retreat. And one writer's idea about bringing fresh water in to restore it was good, also.

I am just wondering about the big picture here...if the quake does begin under the Salton Sea, the bottom line is that you would not want a tidal wave sweeping everyone and every home and business away that is in the Valley.

This is a time in our nation when we have to force ourselves to be super practical--when you study science from all perspectives and facts and observe increasing patterns, it seems like many parts of our Earth are in that cycle of either turning upside down or wearing out.

Translated, that means we will all be dealing with various survival scenarios and money must be put to the best use to continue life and the economy of each region. Or, everyone can pretend nothing will happen and be as devastated as the people in the Gulf region, two long years after Hurricane Katrina.

“All power to the people.”

Since: Mar 07

San Diego, CA

#18 Aug 28, 2007
swreview wrote:
QUESTION: currently, how dangerous is the Salton Sea's polluted water/air to respiratory concerns of residents living near it? Also, how deep is the Salton Sea?
BIG PICTURE? I read in your state's technical information that the big earthquake may start underneath the Salton Sea.
Is it possible that there is a hidden blessing in this body of water "shrinking," i.e., that the entire Coachella Valley will not be flooded? The stench driving people away would also protect them, should that catastrophe occur.
I surely agree with comments above about its earlier wonderful years--it is hard to lose something as great as a seaside retreat. And one writer's idea about bringing fresh water in to restore it was good, also.
I am just wondering about the big picture here...if the quake does begin under the Salton Sea, the bottom line is that you would not want a tidal wave sweeping everyone and every home and business away that is in the Valley.
This is a time in our nation when we have to force ourselves to be super practical--when you study science from all perspectives and facts and observe increasing patterns, it seems like many parts of our Earth are in that cycle of either turning upside down or wearing out.
Translated, that means we will all be dealing with various survival scenarios and money must be put to the best use to continue life and the economy of each region. Or, everyone can pretend nothing will happen and be as devastated as the people in the Gulf region, two long years after Hurricane Katrina.
Water would tend to lubricate the underlying rock. The tidal waves concern would apply to all lakes.

The stench is because the lake is shrinking more than anything. concentrating the salts, etc. It would take a lot of water to flood the Coachella Valley.

“SW Adventures and Resources”

Since: Aug 07

United States

#19 Aug 31, 2007
CitizenX wrote:
<quoted text>
Water would tend to lubricate the underlying rock. The tidal waves concern would apply to all lakes.
The stench is because the lake is shrinking more than anything. concentrating the salts, etc. It would take a lot of water to flood the Coachella Valley.
Explain, please...what is the scientific connection between water lubricating the underlying rock and the comment about the big quake perhaps originating in the Salton Sea?

I am interested because of my own observation about the earthquakes...I notice such an increase in frequency of quakes during the hottest days...everything expanding underneath the ground, right? Are you saying that KEEPING the Salton Sea water would slow the quake down?

Considering the massive tsunami that came from an underwater quake in Asia, that lubrication did not help.

Help me understand the science of what you are thinking, please.

“All power to the people.”

Since: Mar 07

San Diego, CA

#20 Aug 31, 2007
swreview wrote:
<quoted text>
Explain, please...what is the scientific connection between water lubricating the underlying rock and the comment about the big quake perhaps originating in the Salton Sea?
I am interested because of my own observation about the earthquakes...I notice such an increase in frequency of quakes during the hottest days...everything expanding underneath the ground, right? Are you saying that KEEPING the Salton Sea water would slow the quake down?
Considering the massive tsunami that came from an underwater quake in Asia, that lubrication did not help.
Help me understand the science of what you are thinking, please.
Water pressure between rocks tends to keep those rocks from hanging up on each other.

Massives Tsunamis happen because of a displacement of water for some reason. Landslide, up-thrusting and those kinds of movements. The lake or the area around it has no real potential for a massive landslide to displace the water creating a tsunami. It's relatively flat around the lake. Conceivably a massive up-thrusting of a section of land could create a tsunami but there aren't any significant faults under the Salton Sea.

Have you seen pictures of the dry lake beds in the eastern California desert? Very expansive but some of the area don't vary in depth more than a few feet. I am not sure how deep the Salton Sea is but it was a dry lake bed before the accident that created it.

That water "lubrication" can also cause earthquakes by putting pressure on the rocks causing them to slip.

The "big quake" fault lines are west of the Salton Sea, a couple of hundred miles.

As far as the stink and danger of blowing dust and chemicals. The Salton Sea is very salty. Those salts include salt of course, fertilizers and other farm chemicals. If the lake dries up they are left in the dust so to speak and where you have dust and wind.... it gets blown all over.

We need to save the lake by restoring it. Like I posted previously there is plenty of water being dumped in the ocean on a daily basis. With enough political will and money of course, we could pump that treated water up over the mountains in Eastern San Diego County (4144 highest lever through the passes), use it to generate electricity to run the pumps and minimize cost. Use it for irrigation instead of Colorado River or Northern California water. Gravity will make it flow eventually to the lake.

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