Anne Bailey Elementary

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#1 Aug 31, 2012
Thoughts about Anne Bailey? The new Principal? I've heard a few stories and have some opinions myself!.
Options

Moneta, VA

#2 Sep 1, 2012
If you are unsatisfied with the school your child is attending, you have options.
1. Attend PTO meetings and get involved in order to offer suggestions to things you are unsatisfied.
2. Go to the new principal & discuss possible solutions to resolve pressing issues you may have.
3. Switch to another school or homeschool.

Hopefully whatever is bothering you is resolved quickly.

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#3 Sep 1, 2012
I wanted others thoughts, never said I was unsatisfied.
sa mama

Nitro, WV

#4 Sep 22, 2012
i myself have never been a fan of that school in particular..as a matter of fact i live directly across from it and choose to take my child across town to another school buuut i have several friends in my neighborhood whos children attend the school and seem to really like it this year...
joe

Charleston, WV

#5 Sep 23, 2012
Greatschools.com gave Anne Bailey a 2 out of 5. That speaks volumes. It's truly amazing how far that school has sunk over the years. The influx of lower class people that moved into the area over the years is the reason for school having horrible westest score.
truefully

Saint Albans, WV

#6 Sep 24, 2012
the reason behind low west test score is because students realize that this test isnt worth a grade so therefor they just fly through it just to get it done, not all students do this but a majority of them do. the low income families that live in this area is not the cause. the children from these low income families are usually some of the brightest in the class. its been this way ever since i went to anne bailey back in the 90s and early 2000s.
dyd

Ardsley, NY

#7 Sep 24, 2012
truefully wrote:
the reason behind low west test score is because students realize that this test isnt worth a grade so therefor they just fly through it just to get it done, not all students do this but a majority of them do. the low income families that live in this area is not the cause. the children from these low income families are usually some of the brightest in the class. its been this way ever since i went to anne bailey back in the 90s and early 2000s.
That's a lame excuse and you know it. Why don't other schools have the same mentality. This trickles up to the middle school and high school level too. I'm not saying all low income kids don't do we'll in school but the majority do and test scores prove that. Look at the south hills area. They have 4 elementary schools that are ranked 10. I assure you the gene pool is in play.
that guy

Nitro, WV

#8 Sep 24, 2012
Easy answer?
Miracle Acres and Carriage Hill.
You can't educate stupid.
Poor shaming--serious ly

Peytona, WV

#9 Sep 28, 2012
Joe, dyd:
Both of you imply that an influx of low income students into the school has resulted in lower quality testing scores.
I'll ignore your own ignorance regarding socioeconomic factors and the gene pool. I'll only say that you're dipping your toes into waters you're academically unprepared to wade.
If you're actually interested in the factors involved in these test scores, you'll need to consider these very carefully:
(a.) The amount of money spent per student. It is a fact that schools all across the country invest less money into schools populated with more low income students. There are excpetions, but they are sparse. There is a direct link between investment and not only student scoring, but student performance in life.
(b.) The amount of one-on-one time provided to students by the instructor. Again, it is a fact that lower income schools--as a result of their poor funding--tend to have more heavily populated classrooms, with substantially less time given to individual students.
(c.) Parental involvement. It is also well established that students living in low income homes often have parents who are less involved. Given your inclination to poor-shaming, I will go out on a limb and assume that you would automatically assume this is because these parents simply don't care, or don't care enough. This, too, is a false assumption. The average parent in a low income family has fewer hours available to dedicate to their children and tutoring, as they frequently work longer hours and/or moonlight for extra funds to finance the family's needs than parents in more financially stable homes. Children living in poverty are also much more likely to have both parents working.
There are a wide variety of contributing factors. Most are related to our tendency to provide more to students who already have the most.
Children in poverty, through no fault of their own, and with nothing to do with their gene pool (I truly hope you someday realize the idiocy behind that comment, and the unintended insult you levied upon yourself for those of us who actually know something about this issue)are born into a situation with life's cards stacked against them. Until present, our solution seems to be to underfund them, give them the lowest quality teachers in the job market, and them blame the children themselves for our failing them.
avb11

Ardsley, NY

#10 Sep 28, 2012
Poor shaming--seriously wrote:
Joe, dyd:
Both of you imply that an influx of low income students into the school has resulted in lower quality testing scores.
I'll ignore your own ignorance regarding socioeconomic factors and the gene pool. I'll only say that you're dipping your toes into waters you're academically unprepared to wade.
If you're actually interested in the factors involved in these test scores, you'll need to consider these very carefully:
(a.) The amount of money spent per student. It is a fact that schools all across the country invest less money into schools populated with more low income students. There are excpetions, but they are sparse. There is a direct link between investment and not only student scoring, but student performance in life.
(b.) The amount of one-on-one time provided to students by the instructor. Again, it is a fact that lower income schools--as a result of their poor funding--tend to have more heavily populated classrooms, with substantially less time given to individual students.
(c.) Parental involvement. It is also well established that students living in low income homes often have parents who are less involved. Given your inclination to poor-shaming, I will go out on a limb and assume that you would automatically assume this is because these parents simply don't care, or don't care enough. This, too, is a false assumption. The average parent in a low income family has fewer hours available to dedicate to their children and tutoring, as they frequently work longer hours and/or moonlight for extra funds to finance the family's needs than parents in more financially stable homes. Children living in poverty are also much more likely to have both parents working.
There are a wide variety of contributing factors. Most are related to our tendency to provide more to students who already have the most.
Children in poverty, through no fault of their own, and with nothing to do with their gene pool (I truly hope you someday realize the idiocy behind that comment, and the unintended insult you levied upon yourself for those of us who actually know something about this issue)are born into a situation with life's cards stacked against them. Until present, our solution seems to be to underfund them, give them the lowest quality teachers in the job market, and them blame the children themselves for our failing them.
I agree with the gene pool also, kids even look different. Anne Bailey students don't pass the eye test, you could take 50 kids from that school and you couldn't match them as far as looks with other schools like Kenna Elm. They just look slow, obese and mentally challenged. You just don't see those types of kids in that amount of quantity at schools in wealthier districts. For the record I'm not wealthy and my kids go to Duval. I assure the bad gene pool is at work at Duval. It's not even debatable. If you don't see it you are just blinded by the fact thy you don't want to see it that way.
enough

Nitro, WV

#11 Sep 28, 2012
avb11 wrote:
<quoted text>I agree with the gene pool also, kids even look different. Anne Bailey students don't pass the eye test, you could take 50 kids from that school and you couldn't match them as far as looks with other schools like Kenna Elm. They just look slow, obese and mentally challenged. You just don't see those types of kids in that amount of quantity at schools in wealthier districts. For the record I'm not wealthy and my kids go to Duval. I assure the bad gene pool is at work at Duval. It's not even debatable. If you don't see it you are just blinded by the fact thy you don't want to see it that way.
You are cruel to speak about kids this way! Karma is a bitch and I hope it bites you in the ass in a hard way! Your comments make me sick!

My daughter goes to that school and she is not obese, slow or mentally challenged. Children are a product of their environment so if mom and dad aren't around or aren't involved that is not the child's fault.
dan

Ardsley, NY

#12 Sep 28, 2012
enough wrote:
<quoted text>You are cruel to speak about kids this way! Karma is a bitch and I hope it bites you in the ass in a hard way! Your comments make me sick!

My daughter goes to that school and she is not obese, slow or mentally challenged. Children are a product of their environment so if mom and dad aren't around or aren't involved that is not the child's fault.
I don't think anyone is saying its the kids fault it's the fault of both parents for breeding with someone else with bad genes.
Beth

Saint Albans, WV

#13 Oct 2, 2012
My child has gone to Anne Bailey Elementary for the past couple of years. It is a great school. I love the teachers and the principal. We are middle classed citizens who have college degree's, and full time jobs, so our children are not obese or whatever you said about the gene pool.
Moe

Charleston, WV

#14 Oct 3, 2012
Beth wrote:
My child has gone to Anne Bailey Elementary for the past couple of years. It is a great school. I love the teachers and the principal. We are middle classed citizens who have college degree's, and full time jobs, so our children are not obese or whatever you said about the gene pool.
Not everyone falls in that category like he said, but there are several that do.
liz

United States

#15 Oct 3, 2012
Personaly if the school ranking went down its not the students. It would be the teachers and staff flaunt, who ever would make comment about kids like that is a fucktard.
stew

Springfield, NJ

#16 Oct 3, 2012
liz wrote:
Personaly if the school ranking went down its not the students. It would be the teachers and staff flaunt, who ever would make comment about kids like that is a fucktard.
This is untrue. Data doesn't show that teachers play that big of a role in how ell a child does in school. The biggest factor is economics. Wealthier people tend to home educate their children at a young adolescent age of 1 to 3 years of age. That's when a child will learn the basics of comprehension and that builds a solid foundation from that point. Most wealthier parent or parents tend to have four years of college and that makes the parent/teacher more qualified in teaching those basic foundations. This isn't the rule, but the majority. Just take a look at greatschools.com and its pretty obvious where the higher rated schools are and the lesser rated schools like on the west side and Lincoln county where average income is far less than than the state average.
Its bad

Hurricane, WV

#17 Nov 9, 2014
My daughter is a student here and I am already considering homeschooling. They have lost/ misfiled her shot records, they don't notify the parents if their are any contagious outbreaks such as the flu or lice, and they simply don't have the staff or funds they need. The teacher are exhausted and warn thin from being outnumbered by students. They just want to get shit done instead of actually teaching the students how to do it themselves.
U know nothing

Charleston, WV

#18 Nov 17, 2014
It's bad most schools don't notify about the flu and lice outbreak, I know a few teachers there one is my daughter and she loves it there, and about the teachers are exhausted and wanting to getting the shit done and not wanting to actual teach. All schools have teachers like that. I have been around several schools and ann bailey does more for them kids then most school around here.At Christmas they have christmas trees lining the hall and the use different trees for different countries in the world and they learn about it.. It's a good school and it's getting better everyday.. Go home school ur kids so they won't know how to deal with life situations

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