Henican: Harsh drug laws didn't pay

Henican: Harsh drug laws didn't pay

There are 14 comments on the Newsday story from Mar 29, 2009, titled Henican: Harsh drug laws didn't pay. In it, Newsday reports that:

In the end, it was the money. Not liberal theory. Not anybody's softheartedness or the claims about race and class.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Newsday.

republican for life

Morgantown, WV

#1 Mar 29, 2009
I wish they had not reformed these laws. While I agree that these laws are completely counterproductive and achieve nothing positive, I still wish they had not reformed them. There are so many Americans who still believe we can win the war on drugs by putting more people in cages. I say, lets prove them wrong. Keep putting people in jail for ridiculously long sentences. Raise taxes and cut public spending on education and infrastrucure to pay to house non-violent drug offenders. Let these moron drug war supporters continue to pay for the pointless war on drugs until they are forced to admit that it is a failed public policy. Sure, millions of lives will be destroyed in the process, but in the end we might actually succeed in ending the war on drugs, and begin treating addiction like the medical condition it is. Now we have a slow bleed, let the patient die so we can move on.
BernieJakeoff

Baldwin, NY

#2 Mar 29, 2009
When is it not about the money, even with your libtard friends.

Keep twittering, you twit. You were buried so low on-line, we almost couldn't find your sorry sob story of the week.

Fire this irrelevant P O S!
none

New York, NY

#3 Mar 29, 2009
why not just save the jail cells for petifiles!!

“27 wins”

Since: Jan 07

Bradford, PA

#4 Apr 1, 2009
BernieJakeoff wrote:
When is it not about the money, even with your libtard friends.
Keep twittering, you twit. You were buried so low on-line, we almost couldn't find your sorry sob story of the week.
Fire this irrelevant P O S!
That wasn't a sob story; sob stories are about po' folk who don't take responsibility for their actions and beg for he'p. Like GM and Chrysler, CitiGroup and AIG.
Just Saying

Laurel, MD

#5 Apr 1, 2009
Ellis, how about some real reporting on the so-called "nonviolent" drug offenders sentenced under the Rockefeller laws? The impression given by the opponents of these laws and the media is that people were sent to prison for years just for possession of small quantities of personal use drugs. However, the reality is that nobody went to jail for possessing a joint, or just using drugs. These sentences were meted out to drug violators who weren't just mere users, but who sold, transported or otherwise engaged in illegal narcotics trafficking. Thanks to the libs, now New York cops and DAs will have a harder time going after these criminals, because all they'll have to do when caught is claim that they're addicted, and judges will send them to "treatment" instead of jail, where they belong. This will only lead to increased drug abuse, and more associated crimes such as robbery, burglary and car thefts as the increasing numbers of addicts prey on the rest of us to feed their habits. How about another story in 5 years, comparing the crime rates and numbers of addicts during the Rockefeller drug laws, and afterwards? I'll bet both will have increased dramatically.
republican for life

Morgantown, WV

#6 Apr 1, 2009
Just Saying wrote:
Ellis, how about some real reporting on the so-called "nonviolent" drug offenders sentenced under the Rockefeller laws? The impression given by the opponents of these laws and the media is that people were sent to prison for years just for possession of small quantities of personal use drugs. However, the reality is that nobody went to jail for possessing a joint, or just using drugs. These sentences were meted out to drug violators who weren't just mere users, but who sold, transported or otherwise engaged in illegal narcotics trafficking. Thanks to the libs, now New York cops and DAs will have a harder time going after these criminals, because all they'll have to do when caught is claim that they're addicted, and judges will send them to "treatment" instead of jail, where they belong. This will only lead to increased drug abuse, and more associated crimes such as robbery, burglary and car thefts as the increasing numbers of addicts prey on the rest of us to feed their habits. How about another story in 5 years, comparing the crime rates and numbers of addicts during the Rockefeller drug laws, and afterwards? I'll bet both will have increased dramatically.
Your an idiot. The drug laws have proven to be completely ineffective at detering drug abuse or reducing availability of drugs. Putting dealers in cages isn't making drugs harder to obtain. It just makes idiots like you sleep better at night thinking we are winning the drug war. Its time to spend our limited resources on treating addiction not caging dealers who were looking to make a fast buck. No matter how many we jail, drugs will always be easily accessible to those who want them. You cannot overcome the law of supply and demand. Wake up already.
On the Real side

Gorham, ME

#7 Apr 3, 2009
Just Saying wrote:
Ellis, how about some real reporting on the so-called "nonviolent" drug offenders sentenced under the Rockefeller laws? The impression given by the opponents of these laws and the media is that people were sent to prison for years just for possession of small quantities of personal use drugs. However, the reality is that nobody went to jail for possessing a joint, or just using drugs. These sentences were meted out to drug violators who weren't just mere users, but who sold, transported or otherwise engaged in illegal narcotics trafficking. Thanks to the libs, now New York cops and DAs will have a harder time going after these criminals, because all they'll have to do when caught is claim that they're addicted, and judges will send them to "treatment" instead of jail, where they belong. This will only lead to increased drug abuse, and more associated crimes such as robbery, burglary and car thefts as the increasing numbers of addicts prey on the rest of us to feed their habits. How about another story in 5 years, comparing the crime rates and numbers of addicts during the Rockefeller drug laws, and afterwards? I'll bet both will have increased dramatically.
NYS is finished: drug dealers are already out in force because even now they get like 2yrs and one year PRS for narcotics sales...Heroin is all over NYS now, it used to be confined to NYC..future costs of rehab for many more, hospital costs for wounding and maiming, will outweigh any savings
This is a Catch and Release tactic but the public gets screwed
goodbye to you

Holtsville, NY

#8 Apr 3, 2009
I didnt know this load ellis henican still had a job. i know he got fired from the radio. i figured him and lynn white were busy spewing their idiocy in another state by now
Tommy

New York, NY

#9 Apr 3, 2009
republican for life wrote:
<quoted text>
Your an idiot. The drug laws have proven to be completely ineffective at detering drug abuse or reducing availability of drugs. Putting dealers in cages isn't making drugs harder to obtain. It just makes idiots like you sleep better at night thinking we are winning the drug war. Its time to spend our limited resources on treating addiction not caging dealers who were looking to make a fast buck. No matter how many we jail, drugs will always be easily accessible to those who want them. You cannot overcome the law of supply and demand. Wake up already.
Well, now we shall see
republican for life

Morgantown, WV

#10 Apr 3, 2009
Tommy wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, now we shall see
No, we won't see. Nothing has really changed. Most public resources will still be devoted to law enforcement and prisons not to treatment programs. Drugs will still be sold by criminals in unregulated markets, the violence, disease, and destruction will continue as before. The real solution is to end drug prohibition. It simply does not work.
Huntington resident

Englishtown, NJ

#11 Apr 7, 2009
Elwood teachers OFFERED TO RENEGOTIATE their contract - save the district $600,000 for the upcoming budget. The Elwood administration can't get their act together to take them up on the offer - can you imagine?! VOTE NO ON YOUR BUDGET - your administration is fiscally inept.
Bill

Gorham, ME

#12 Apr 12, 2009
Just Saying wrote:
Ellis, how about some real reporting on the so-called "nonviolent" drug offenders sentenced under the Rockefeller laws? The impression given by the opponents of these laws and the media is that people were sent to prison for years just for possession of small quantities of personal use drugs. However, the reality is that nobody went to jail for possessing a joint, or just using drugs. These sentences were meted out to drug violators who weren't just mere users, but who sold, transported or otherwise engaged in illegal narcotics trafficking. Thanks to the libs, now New York cops and DAs will have a harder time going after these criminals, because all they'll have to do when caught is claim that they're addicted, and judges will send them to "treatment" instead of jail, where they belong. This will only lead to increased drug abuse, and more associated crimes such as robbery, burglary and car thefts as the increasing numbers of addicts prey on the rest of us to feed their habits. How about another story in 5 years, comparing the crime rates and numbers of addicts during the Rockefeller drug laws, and afterwards? I'll bet both will have increased dramatically.
when u only get drug court for dealing or one year, we will soon be overwhelmed with addiction and violence..Albany, ny almost had no Heroin 5 yrs ago. now it is here and in any adjoining county and in the sticks...NYC dealers ran here after being pushed out of the Bad Apple
Tony from Brooklyn

Hawthorne, NJ

#13 Apr 12, 2009
republican for life wrote:
<quoted text>
Your an idiot. The drug laws have proven to be completely ineffective at detering drug abuse or reducing availability of drugs. Putting dealers in cages isn't making drugs harder to obtain. It just makes idiots like you sleep better at night thinking we are winning the drug war. Its time to spend our limited resources on treating addiction not caging dealers who were looking to make a fast buck. No matter how many we jail, drugs will always be easily accessible to those who want them. You cannot overcome the law of supply and demand. Wake up already.
Say it again. Maybe the ignorant will be enlightened.
Tony from Brooklyn

Hawthorne, NJ

#14 Apr 12, 2009
Bill wrote:
<quoted text>when u only get drug court for dealing or one year, we will soon be overwhelmed with addiction and violence..Albany, ny almost had no Heroin 5 yrs ago. now it is here and in any adjoining county and in the sticks...NYC dealers ran here after being pushed out of the Bad Apple
Heroin is rising in the white community. Fact there are more whites using drugs then blacks. If you took the black face off drug users and replaced it with a white face on it the laws would change tomorrow. It's your preceptions as to who uses drugs that's wrong. Once you get the facts you'll change in a heartbeat.

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