Training service dogs is Leominster m...

Training service dogs is Leominster man's passion - Sentinel & Enterprise

There are 12 comments on the Sentinel & Enterprise story from Nov 15, 2010, titled Training service dogs is Leominster man's passion - Sentinel & Enterprise. In it, Sentinel & Enterprise reports that:

Terry McCormack brought his dog, Cassy, to the Mall at Whitney Field recently and demonstrated how the dog reacts when she detects that a diabetic owner's blood sugar has dropped too low.

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PROUD

Leominster, MA

#1 Nov 15, 2010
I have noticed that Service Dogs have become more popular over the years. Seeing what they do for people out in public just amazes me. Diabetic alert is a great thing! I wish a friend of mine who died 2 years ago had one of these dogs. He died from his organs shutting down from a diabetic induced coma. He would still be around today if he had a dog to alert him that his blood sugar was to low.
It is nice to see that a Leominster resident has the ability to train Service Dogs and is doing what he can to help people with disabilities. I am willing to bet that these dogs would help with health care costs as well as enrich the lives of people with disabilities. From what I have seen, the dogs can do the a job or jobs that helps disabled people stay alive and make it easier for them to live more independently along with all the other benefits I mentioned. I believe this trainer is someone we can all be proud of in our community.
Lauren Cannon

Marlborough, MA

#2 Nov 16, 2010
This is an incredible attribute to what dogs can actually do. I am learning a Lot from Terry during the apprenticeship program.
Ann Marie Montello

Franklin, MA

#3 Nov 18, 2010
I am the woman whose service dog is being trained by Terry McCormack. I have experience with a non-profit agency that trains service dogs in New York State. I was given a dog who could not help me in any way, shape or form at three years of age. She was given to one family, returned to the organization, then given to me. She was petrified in public places so my life centers around being in public places and she could not meet my needs. It hurt to have to give her up as I bonded with her but knew she could not save me. They took her back for re-training as many service dog facilities must do, but it did not work. She then was placed in a home with a deaf man who rarely went out. Thus, three times they made a huge amount of money, of which I got nothing back when she had to go back after only 3 months. I lost all my money that I used of my own as well as fund-raised. Saddened by all of this, I purchased my own dog at three months of age and searched all over the states to find a service dog trainer to train my dog to help hear things for me and alert me to low blood sugars. After 45 years with diabetes, I no longer feel symptoms. I thank God each day that we found Terry. Unlike some of the trainers that are doing such in the non-profit sector, Terry has his heart and soul into his work and he is very smart so his training always works. His dogs will not have to go back to be re-trained I feel. My dog Cullen is a gem and each week Terry comes to my home to train us plus we go to restaurants, stores and soon to the movies for training. My life has changed since Terry has been working with my Goldendoodle,for the best.
NEADS is over rated

Leominster, MA

#4 Nov 18, 2010
A good quality professional trainer is better than a volenteer at a non profit any day of the week. I am glad you found a good trainer to help you. Most are not that lucky as you found out. Spending all that time fund raising to help a organisation that makes over 15MIL gross a year is not right, I wish I did not fall for the hoopla of the NEADS show. Hindsite is 20-20 unfortunately.
If this guy is as good as you say he is, you should thank god and feel lucky. A lot of the other service dog orgs just blame their own client for their failures.
leominster

Leominster, MA

#5 Nov 21, 2010
Terry is a great guy. He has a real talent for training dogs.
lauren

Marlborough, MA

#6 Nov 25, 2010
The service dog industry is an interesting one...the amount of information from different people can be so confusing. Definitly st. Francis german shepherd service dogs has the right information the first time.
ellen

Milton, MA

#7 Jul 25, 2012
Ann Marie Montello wrote:
I am the woman whose service dog is being trained by Terry McCormack. I have experience with a non-profit agency that trains service dogs in New York State. I was given a dog who could not help me in any way, shape or form at three years of age. She was given to one family, returned to the organization, then given to me. She was petrified in public places so my life centers around being in public places and she could not meet my needs. It hurt to have to give her up as I bonded with her but knew she could not save me. They took her back for re-training as many service dog facilities must do, but it did not work. She then was placed in a home with a deaf man who rarely went out. Thus, three times they made a huge amount of money, of which I got nothing back when she had to go back after only 3 months. I lost all my money that I used of my own as well as fund-raised. Saddened by all of this, I purchased my own dog at three months of age and searched all over the states to find a service dog trainer to train my dog to help hear things for me and alert me to low blood sugars. After 45 years with diabetes, I no longer feel symptoms. I thank God each day that we found Terry. Unlike some of the trainers that are doing such in the non-profit sector, Terry has his heart and soul into his work and he is very smart so his training always works. His dogs will not have to go back to be re-trained I feel. My dog Cullen is a gem and each week Terry comes to my home to train us plus we go to restaurants, stores and soon to the movies for training. My life has changed since Terry has been working with my Goldendoodle,for the best.
I experienced a similar situation but I did not return my service dog - I had had a service dog before - I did my best to provide remedial training. Still my dog ate paper from wastebaskets, barked at other dogs, was never really helpful with balance when walking, etc. He grew to be a bit calmer and more responsive but he became ill. I believe I know the org you are talking of - I witness another dog pulling a very ill young man with MD and severe diabetes out of his wheelchair to chase a rabbit. The woman who oversees the training broke with the organization, one of the founding service dog groups, over some difference. I always wondered why - I think I will investigate it further.

In any case, I believe what you experienced was FRAUD. A report to the Attorney General of New York State who oversees some of these charities and their practices might yield some results. I am glad you have a well trained service dog now. There are a lot of people who diminish, discount, and dismiss people with disabilities - it is up to us to speak up and advocate for each other and ourselves! All the best!
Ellen

Milton, MA

#8 Jul 25, 2012
NEADS is over rated wrote:
A good quality professional trainer is better than a volenteer at a non profit any day of the week. I am glad you found a good trainer to help you. Most are not that lucky as you found out. Spending all that time fund raising to help a organisation that makes over 15MIL gross a year is not right, I wish I did not fall for the hoopla of the NEADS show. Hindsite is 20-20 unfortunately.
If this guy is as good as you say he is, you should thank god and feel lucky. A lot of the other service dog orgs just blame their own client for their failures.
Thanks for your comment. There is something odd abt NEADS asking for $9500 - I have witnessed some of their dogs in public - no thank you!

I personally chose PAWS With A Cause for my first service dog and then went with the NYState group. I witness one of their trainers kicking my service dog in the side hard. When I reported it my complaint was not acknowledged.

Some people prey on persons with disabilities. I had a very good experience with PAWS and I trust Mike Sapp who runs the concern. I will check out SFGS service dogs too. That model of training in the community where you live is the same that PAW with a Cause has been using since the 1970's.

Now I wonder when health insurance is going to cover service dogs - because they do heal!!! And heel too if they are trained with CGC behaviors.
Ellen

Milton, MA

#9 Jul 25, 2012
Forgive my typos - I have neuropathy in my hands due to pesky unpredictable and frustrating MS.
SFGSSD

Clinton, MA

#10 Sep 12, 2012
Hello Everyone,

Thank you for all the nice comments on the article.
Ellen, SFGSSD matches you with a puppy that has been screened specifically for your needs and lifestyle in mind alone. During the 12-16 month training process, we spend 1/2 a day with you once a month in your environment till you and your Service Dog is ready to be teamed full time. This is a unique training program that is not duplicated by anyone else that I am aware of. It is a lot more work to do it this way but the results speak for themselves.
Jennifer Ahearn

Milton, MA

#11 May 18, 2013
I spent a few years on the wait list for a dog from Paws With A Cause, I chose this organization because transportation was an issue for me and they have field representatives in different areas that come out to your place to conduct interviews, etc. I had an extended home interview and filled out tons of paper work, as did my neurologist. The end result? I was denied and the reason give was that they thought that I needed a Seizure Alert Dog not a dog for Balance Assist. They assumed this because of my primary diagnosis being epilepsy, my seizure activity is a direct reason for why I need help with balance but I was VERY clear about my needs and this should have been caught at the beginning of the process, not at the end. They told me that they no longer train dogs for Balance or Bracing. They said that there is too much risk of injury to the dog. I've been around dogs my whole life and I'm not stupid or irresponsible, I would never risk injury to my dog, pet, service, or otherwise by using it for significant weight bearing but they once I'm denied, there is little I can do about their decision. I can't tell you how disappointed I was. Now I have just submitted an application to Terry at SFGS and have high hopes and fingers crossed that he finds me suitable and eligible for one of his dogs. I have watched all of his videos and read everything that I could get my hands on and Terry's standards appear to be so above any other organization that I have looked in to. Wish me luck, as I wish all of you luck with your dogs, as well!
WOW

Leominster, MA

#14 Jul 4, 2013
WOW GOOD LUCK, I have seen 2 of his dogs in action. If you are saying he is a wanna-be trainer, you must walk on water as a trainer to make an accusation like that. They were the best trained dogs I have ever seen. Your statement does not wash.

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