In recovery from a mental illness

Full story: Asheville Citizen-Times

ASHEVILLE Wes Bell was diagnosed with bipolar disorder 10 years ago, when he was 16.

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LawnMowingQueen

Candler, NC

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#1
Jan 20, 2009
 
What a great story. Good luck to you Mr.Bell.
NC mama

United States

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#2
Jan 20, 2009
 
Good Luck to all the graduates. This is an awesome idea - hopefully we can get more like it in the future.
Advocate

Chapel Hill, NC

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#3
Jan 20, 2009
 
I love Cooper Riis and the evidence based/best practices Recovery Model. Advocates EVERYWHERE settle for nothing less in your communities....let your legislators hear from you...funding for this type recovery is a must!
Georgia61

Asheville, NC

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#4
Jan 20, 2009
 
I agree with everything said! I am in recovery form addiction and mental illness. I've also been blessed with intellect and a college eduacation and have been working in the addiction and mental health field for over 10 years. The Recovery Model works...if you work it!

“www.coppertoken. com”

Since: Sep 07

State of Confusion

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#5
Jan 20, 2009
 
Good for NC! They had this same program in Va. A girl I have known for...umm since I was a child was gonna be one of the teachers in this for she has it as well. Funding was however cut this year.

Why is it so many people have this disorder these days? And I am serious....not making fun of anyone with this. I just dont understand why there is so many with it.

“Conservative for America”

Since: Apr 07

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#6
Jan 20, 2009
 

Judged:

1

Forgive me for being the wet blanket and for not explaining why I am even interested but from the article I am failing to see a huge woohoo. I went to the site and great they are a couciling center charging $9,800 a month. I certainly hope that guaranteed results come with that as well as 24 hour on call therapists. Don't misunderstand my comment, anything to lessen the pain of those that suffer bi-polar is wonderful. My question and the facilities site nor any further searches provided any great new approach beyond talk therapy. I read where the phychiatrist and medication were prescribed by your outside doctor and that the program didn't even include medication management into their efforts. I find it difficult to believe that this is anything more than the latest in fad fixes. With the monthly price and the possible expected stay up to 18 months this seems more like a place for the rich to house their problem children then a real effort to fill the need of bi-polars to learn to manage their verified mental illness in an ongoing way.

Did I mention that that state several times that they are not considered a medical facility and therefore insurance and medicare will not cover a stay there. We've all posted back and forth so you know when I am being open and when I am just throwing out my opinions. Seriously who amoung you whether you suffer or not can afford %9,800 a month cash out of your hard saved bank account. Remember the stay san be up to 18 months, assuming when the money runs out your cured, and they offer half way homes even after you leave the camp. In the following paragraph you will read where I do see a glimmer of possitive opportunity.

What I did read with great interest was the training of the sufferer to identify the onset of symtoms so that they could alter treatment ahead of a shift. That is great news and should be standard practice for all in patient and out patient centers nation wide. No additional funds needed after the original round of training. Teach these Bi-polar sufferers to be able to understand and react ahead of an episode and thousands of currently disabled and wanting to be productive individuals will be able to contribute to society. That will save billions right there.

“www.coppertoken. com”

Since: Sep 07

State of Confusion

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#7
Jan 20, 2009
 
Hmmmm Thats what I get for skimming over it. I thought this was state funded and ran.

One thing is though I have a hard time with doctors telling teens they are bi-polar. To me it is almost the same epidemic proportions as the children being labeled ADD.
local

United States

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#8
Jan 20, 2009
 
I believe a lot of the increase in numbers of folks with depression is due to the increase in numbers of people who endure emotional, physical, and sexual abuse.

Maybe if our society would do something substantial about the abuse, the numbers of people with depression would decrease...
tfj

United States

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#9
Jan 20, 2009
 
Ravenz Moon wrote:
One thing is though I have a hard time with doctors telling teens they are bi-polar. To me it is almost the same epidemic proportions as the children being labeled ADD.
I will fully agree with you on this. A family member is leaving Copestone today after a week's stay. Her mother was told the girl is bipolar - don't really know how they can say that after one week inpatient, short sessions with a counselor, and group sessions. She has been placed on 3 medications. She turned 17 the day she went to the hospital, then to Copestone. Turns out she had experimented with marijuana and alcohol that day, and had a seziure that night leading to the ER visit then Copestone. Yes, she surely does have problems, but bipolar? Not too sure.

“Conservative for America”

Since: Apr 07

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#10
Jan 20, 2009
 
tfj wrote:
<quoted text>
I will fully agree with you on this. A family member is leaving Copestone today after a week's stay. Her mother was told the girl is bipolar - don't really know how they can say that after one week inpatient, short sessions with a counselor, and group sessions. She has been placed on 3 medications. She turned 17 the day she went to the hospital, then to Copestone. Turns out she had experimented with marijuana and alcohol that day, and had a seziure that night leading to the ER visit then Copestone. Yes, she surely does have problems, but bipolar? Not too sure.
If a person goes to the ER and at any point during the examination claimes to be considering suicide-----THE WORLD STOPS----and suddenly its patch you and get a police escort to Copestone. I mean really neither you nore the one above you gave me much to go on but I do know the ER staff have no choice in the matter.

I do agree Copestone, like most mental health facilities, are greatly lacking. A daily visit from a phychiatrist who asks you some questions and then decides what drugs you need is sub par by my standards. The daily group sessions where those most in need are the least likely to talk and are therefore ignored is bad.

As I understand it there are two sides,the at risk and the low risk groups. Either way there is virtually no interaction between the patients or between the patients and the staff. I imagined this mentally troubled person basicly locked up spending nearly all their waking hours in their own head. This, of course, being the last place a bi-polar should be dwelling. I don't know but I would think computer (monitored) access would be good for email and the like. A group TV is bad because bi-polars tend to be dominant or submissive and 1 group TV reinforces negative behaviour. I know you'll laugh but after doing some reading on the subject for reason I'd rather not go into. I think TVs in the patiens rooms offer little risk and the gain is someone not endlessly focusing on the problems they have.

Sadly with places like Broughton that had a campus and stables gone. The mentally ill are stuck locked on floors well away from fresh air or grass. There are options and I saw one once when I accompanied a friend to go pick up his child. It was nice with cabins and private rooms. Plenty of outdoor activities as well as a really nice looking dining hall. There were adminstrative buildings, a school, and other buildings that I don't know what they were for. They focused on children but did have an adult facility segregated from the childrens area. I asked and my friend told me his insurance paid some but he paid out of pocked a few thousand a month. That was 10 years ago.

I disagree with the assumption that sexual abuse is the primary cause of mental illness. I think it is simplistic and minimalizes the true factors, which are complex, behind mental illness.
Sexual abuse is a whole different catagory of mental illness dealing with trauma and not genetic or illness from birth.
local

Taylors, SC

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#11
Jan 20, 2009
 
yona wrote:
<quoted text>
If a person goes to the ER and at any point during the examination claimes to be considering suicide-----THE WORLD STOPS----and suddenly its patch you and get a police escort to Copestone. I mean really neither you nore the one above you gave me much to go on but I do know the ER staff have no choice in the matter.
I do agree Copestone, like most mental health facilities, are greatly lacking. A daily visit from a phychiatrist who asks you some questions and then decides what drugs you need is sub par by my standards. The daily group sessions where those most in need are the least likely to talk and are therefore ignored is bad.
As I understand it there are two sides,the at risk and the low risk groups. Either way there is virtually no interaction between the patients or between the patients and the staff. I imagined this mentally troubled person basicly locked up spending nearly all their waking hours in their own head. This, of course, being the last place a bi-polar should be dwelling. I don't know but I would think computer (monitored) access would be good for email and the like. A group TV is bad because bi-polars tend to be dominant or submissive and 1 group TV reinforces negative behaviour. I know you'll laugh but after doing some reading on the subject for reason I'd rather not go into. I think TVs in the patiens rooms offer little risk and the gain is someone not endlessly focusing on the problems they have.
Sadly with places like Broughton that had a campus and stables gone. The mentally ill are stuck locked on floors well away from fresh air or grass. There are options and I saw one once when I accompanied a friend to go pick up his child. It was nice with cabins and private rooms. Plenty of outdoor activities as well as a really nice looking dining hall. There were adminstrative buildings, a school, and other buildings that I don't know what they were for. They focused on children but did have an adult facility segregated from the childrens area. I asked and my friend told me his insurance paid some but he paid out of pocked a few thousand a month. That was 10 years ago.
I disagree with the assumption that sexual abuse is the primary cause of mental illness. I think it is simplistic and minimalizes the true factors, which are complex, behind mental illness.
Sexual abuse is a whole different catagory of mental illness dealing with trauma and not genetic or illness from birth.
Serotonin/melatonin deficiencies and other chemical imbalances deficiences can occur for a lot of reasons.

But you'd be surprised how many depressed people have been abused.

And our society seems to be apathetic.
For example, look at how lenient so many sentences are for child molesters.

Since: Nov 08

The Mountains of WNC

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#13
Jan 20, 2009
 
tfj wrote:
<quoted text>
I will fully agree with you on this. A family member is leaving Copestone today after a week's stay. Her mother was told the girl is bipolar - don't really know how they can say that after one week inpatient, short sessions with a counselor, and group sessions. She has been placed on 3 medications. She turned 17 the day she went to the hospital, then to Copestone. Turns out she had experimented with marijuana and alcohol that day, and had a seziure that night leading to the ER visit then Copestone. Yes, she surely does have problems, but bipolar? Not too sure.
A friend of mine had a very similar experience at Copestone with his son. One week's stay and the 11 year old kid walks out with a diagnosis of bipolar. You don't diagnose bipolar disorder in children younger than 16. The kid has some serious problems, but bipolar isn't one of them.

“Conservative for America”

Since: Apr 07

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#14
Jan 20, 2009
 
local wrote:
<quoted text>
Serotonin/melatonin deficiencies and other chemical imbalances deficiences can occur for a lot of reasons.
But you'd be surprised how many depressed people have been abused.
And our society seems to be apathetic.
For example, look at how lenient so many sentences are for child molesters.
I'm not at all surprised at the number of mentally ill or depressed, if you prefer, that were abused. In many cases mental illness manifests as either an abused (sumissive) or abuser (azzhole bully). I did try to be polite while making my point that abuse wasn't the sole or primary cause of mental illness. You did specify sexual abuse which is why a made it a point to disagree. Had you generalized as to child, peer, dominance, or sexual I would have probably left it alone.

I do hope, in retrospect, that you were not refering to yourself or someone you know in particular. I meant no insult or minimization of your or your friends ongoing pain. It is absolutely true that those whos power has been taken from them and they have been humiliated repeatedly by the abuser/rapist and then again by the hospital and police. They have ongoing trauma and do need immediate phycological help, of that I 100% agree.

I have dated, in my younger years a couple of previously violated women. On, even years later, could not be intimate. Even a kiss was just to much for her. I kept up with her and she is better now and married. The other was the opposite and wanted intimacy without so much as dinner first. I didn't know she had been raped and had simply thought I had gotten really lucky. Almost immediately after she freaked out and started screaming rape. The only thing that saved me was her brother had the apartment next door and knew what was going on and when the police came they knew all about her issues. It was odd everyone apologised to me and asked me to leave. I always wondered if she had gotten any help. I have another one but it was far more confusing and involved the entire 19** Reynolds football team.
mtn gal

AOL

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#16
Jan 20, 2009
 
MissWhasington, and where did you get your degree? Biploar is real and harmful. These folks do not think and process thoughts like the rest of us. Trust me, I know, I have a daughter with this disorder and God knows, I wish I could change her. Untill you live with it, you have no idea of what goes on.

Since: Nov 08

The Mountains of WNC

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#17
Jan 20, 2009
 
MissWashington wrote:
Bipolar is a hoax.
No, it isn't. I'd like to hear your reasoning as to why you think bipolar is a hoax, and what references you have used to backup that idiotic statement.
local

Taylors, SC

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#18
Jan 20, 2009
 
yona wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm not at all surprised at the number of mentally ill or depressed, if you prefer, that were abused. In many cases mental illness manifests as either an abused (sumissive) or abuser (**** bully). I did try to be polite while making my point that abuse wasn't the sole or primary cause of mental illness. You did specify sexual abuse which is why a made it a point to disagree. Had you generalized as to child, peer, dominance, or sexual I would have probably left it alone.
I do hope, in retrospect, that you were not refering to yourself or someone you know in particular. I meant no insult or minimization of your or your friends ongoing pain. It is absolutely true that those whos power has been taken from them and they have been humiliated repeatedly by the abuser/rapist and then again by the hospital and police. They have ongoing trauma and do need immediate phycological help, of that I 100% agree.
I have dated, in my younger years a couple of previously violated women. On, even years later, could not be intimate. Even a kiss was just to much for her. I kept up with her and she is better now and married. The other was the opposite and wanted intimacy without so much as dinner first. I didn't know she had been raped and had simply thought I had gotten really lucky. Almost immediately after she freaked out and started screaming rape. The only thing that saved me was her brother had the apartment next door and knew what was going on and when the police came they knew all about her issues. It was odd everyone apologised to me and asked me to leave. I always wondered if she had gotten any help. I have another one but it was far more confusing and involved the entire 19** Reynolds football team.
You philosphize and then make a joke about it all.

I have worked with the mentally ill for many years.

It is quite pathetic to see a 92 year old woman on so many medications she just rocks back and forth crying out incessantly "Don't, grandaddy, don't, grandaddy."

and then it is 'minimized', by everyone involved.

Yes, some folks are born with psychological diagnoses, and some acquire them through trauma.

And everyone is different, and everyone requires individualized treatment, and on and on...

My point is- Why can we not at least TRY to PREVENT some of it?

“Conservative for America”

Since: Apr 07

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#19
Jan 20, 2009
 
local wrote:
<quoted text>
You philosphize and then make a joke about it all.
I have worked with the mentally ill for many years.
It is quite pathetic to see a 92 year old woman on so many medications she just rocks back and forth crying out incessantly "Don't, grandaddy, don't, grandaddy."
and then it is 'minimized', by everyone involved.
Yes, some folks are born with psychological diagnoses, and some acquire them through trauma.
And everyone is different, and everyone requires individualized treatment, and on and on...
My point is- Why can we not at least TRY to PREVENT some of it?
I agree with you. I am sorry and your right that I am serious and then make usually inappropriate jokes. It's my defense mechanism when people get too close.
dje1960

Hendersonville, NC

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#20
Jan 21, 2009
 
Our mental health system is so broken I know for a fact Broughton is horrible and Copestone is not much better but you do have to have some kind of insurance to go there the average person with mental illness could not afford this unless they take Medicaid or Medicare but i am glad the program worked for him.
Gianna

United States

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#21
Jan 21, 2009
 
Recovery model as I understand it and practice it and as many people in the movement also do ---

ACTUALLY BELIEVE IN RECOVERY!!!

not chronic, not for the rest of one's life...
and yeah, trauma and abuse is the root cause of most mental health issues..as well as nutritional problems and a whole host of physical things that psychiatrists don't even routinely look for...

I'm an advocate and an activist and I personally KNOW hundreds of fully recovered people with mental health histories (including exreme states that get labeled psychotic mania and schizophrenia) People living without drugs and fully functional...

what you're talking above is not about recovery as long as you're still believing it's chronic and forever and must be medicated forever.

Beyond Meds
http://bipolarblast.wordpress.com/about/
Moss Bliss

United States

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#23
Jan 21, 2009
 
The attacks in most of the above negative comments are directed towards Cooper Riis. Yes, it is a private facility, and yes, it costs a lot of money. But that has nothing to do with the class that Wes and I took, which was paid for by Western Highlands and makes us eligible for employment as Peer Support Specialists. Wes is an incredible human being, and has made huge steps in his own recovery.

I will state that my own recovery was pushed several steps forward by this class, and I've already been considered a hero by many people I have given hope to.

There was NOTHING in this class about mental illness being chronic - indeed, the words "mental" and "illness" were never used together once, and the hope of a full recovery resonated throughout the course. The reporter flat out did not understand much about our class, and made up the difference by researching what OTHER places said about what "recovery" is.

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