Several drug arrests made by deputies

There are 648 comments on the Commonwealth Journal story from Oct 11, 2006, titled Several drug arrests made by deputies. In it, Commonwealth Journal reports that:

The Pulaski County Sheriff's Department, in conjunction with two other agencies, made several drug arrests and issued several court citations over the past week.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Commonwealth Journal.

believe

Russell Springs, KY

#633 Sep 17, 2012
blameitonbush wrote:
<quoted text>not a liberal, apparently everyone cares except you, and i really cant talk to a liberal like you because you people think you are right and everyone else is wrong, you have tunnel vision and think everything is black and white, you are probably gay and don't know it
Better look up meaning of liberal .You make absolutely no sense .Just another nut setting on a computer probably drawing a check .Im just guessing by your lack of educational prowess

“I been hangin' on every word.”

Since: Sep 10

Location hidden

#634 Sep 17, 2012
believe wrote:
<quoted text>Better look up meaning of liberal .You make absolutely no sense .Just another nut setting on a computer probably drawing a check .Im just guessing by your lack of educational prowess
I'm a conservative. My family is conservative. You, sir, are no conservative.

The "conservative" view speaks to a conservative government--as in, a government that is small, concise, and only as large as absolutely necessary. One that does not go to great lengths to find out why you want privacy, but instead accepting your right to it.

The "liberal" view, on the other hand, speaks to a very liberally-applied government. A government that believes its best way to preserve the longevity and health of its citizens is to ensure they make the correct decisions throughout every aspect of their life.

How would a government whose largest goal is to stay small and stay out of the private affairs of its citizens support jailing people for making a less-than-perfect decision? Simply put, it wouldn't. You support jailing people for marijuana. Do you also support jailing them for smoking or drinking? How about eating chocolate? Playing football? Driving an SUV?

Did you know that marijuana was outlawed after a speech where Congress was told that it encouraged white women to have romantic relationships with men of other races? That the textile industry lobbied hard for the banning of marijuana because industrial hemp was such a threat to their industry?

Nothing about marijuana itself causes it to be more dangerous than many commonly available legal forms of recreation--your inability to understand that is not based on your politics--it is your lack of understanding.
believe

Russell Springs, KY

#635 Sep 17, 2012
Kick Brass wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm a conservative. My family is conservative. You, sir, are no conservative.
The "conservative" view speaks to a conservative government--as in, a government that is small, concise, and only as large as absolutely necessary. One that does not go to great lengths to find out why you want privacy, but instead accepting your right to it.
The "liberal" view, on the other hand, speaks to a very liberally-applied government. A government that believes its best way to preserve the longevity and health of its citizens is to ensure they make the correct decisions throughout every aspect of their life.
How would a government whose largest goal is to stay small and stay out of the private affairs of its citizens support jailing people for making a less-than-perfect decision? Simply put, it wouldn't. You support jailing people for marijuana. Do you also support jailing them for smoking or drinking? How about eating chocolate? Playing football? Driving an SUV?
Did you know that marijuana was outlawed after a speech where Congress was told that it encouraged white women to have romantic relationships with men of other races? That the textile industry lobbied hard for the banning of marijuana because industrial hemp was such a threat to their industry?
Nothing about marijuana itself causes it to be more dangerous than many commonly available legal forms of recreation--your inability to understand that is not based on your politics--it is your lack of understanding.
So you are a pot smoker ey .Thats what I take from your post .They were right it caused me to want to have sex with every woman I seen .Boy glad I stopped that stuff.You are not understanding my post .I could care less about pot ,Its the other more dangerous drugs Im talking about. Pot only makes you dumb not violant . Most pot heads are harmless just cant think fast .
Insane Clown Posse

Jamestown, KY

#636 Sep 17, 2012
Thinking wrote:
<quoted text> give them a free one way plane ticket to the country that is supplying the drugs, then they can get all they want and live there too. If a person wants to be so "INTO" taking drugs, give them the opportunity to go first class to the destination area of choice and be right there when it is being produced so they can get the best off the batch and take all they want. Won't have to concern if they ever come back, they wouldn't live long enough in the culture.
good thinking if those countries would let them in! better idea, buy 10000 acres of stripmined land and create a new State of Stupidity install 10000000 cardboard boxes and dog bowls fill the bowls every morning and evening with out of date pills. then close the jails and courthouse, wont need them anymore

“I been hangin' on every word.”

Since: Sep 10

Location hidden

#637 Sep 17, 2012
believe wrote:
<quoted text>So you are a pot smoker ey .Thats what I take from your post .They were right it caused me to want to have sex with every woman I seen .Boy glad I stopped that stuff.You are not understanding my post .I could care less about pot ,Its the other more dangerous drugs Im talking about. Pot only makes you dumb not violant . Most pot heads are harmless just cant think fast .
I have never smoked or even touched marijuana or any other illegal substance. Additionally I have never smoked regular cigarettes and have had fewer drinks of alcohol than I can count on a single hand.

Your assumptions are your own undoing. I don't smoke, drink or smoke pot because I think doing so is a little stupid, because it is harmful to your body. But I'm not going to force someone else to do the same. What's it that Mark Twain said? It's like banning grown men from eating steak because it's too tough for a baby to chew? Just because I choose not to have anything to do with something doesn't mean others shouldn't be allowed to--such is a very liberal idea indeed.

A conservative will say,

"I don't eat meat. But feel free to do so as long as you don't eat my pets."
"I don't shoot guns. But go for it as long as you don't shoot me."
"I don't drink large sodas. But feel free to do so yourself as long as you don't steal mine."

A liberal will say,

"I don't eat meat. You shouldn't be allowed to either."
"I don't shoot guns. You shouldn't be allowed to either."
"I don't drink large sodas. You shouldn't be allowed to either."

Regarding drugs like cocaine/meth/heroin and unfettered access to prescription pills, I'm on the fence. On one hand, my brain says "they have the right to make stupid decisions--if their dumb decision ends up harming someone else then punish them at that point." But my heart is saying, "Some of these things are so addictive even after the first time that a simple misstep in judgment is enough to remove a person's free will to the point of being criminally reckless."

The Bible says that all have sinned--but the other side of that coin is that if you assume everyone will sin, and nobody's perfect, it's difficult to imagine free access to a drug where that simple single misstep is enough to screw up the rest of a person's life.

As I said I'm still on the fence though--pot is seemingly harmless and may have more benefits than we imagined from a medical perspective. There really aren't any good answers as far as other drugs in my opinion--but from a conservative point of view if there isn't a good clear answer the best bet is to *not* legislate it.

My biggest concern is how the drug war can be expanded to other things (something already being done today). You could apply the same logic to firearms "single shot rifles are mostly harmless, but I'm more worried about the more dangerous things like pistols and semi-auto rifles," for example. If we aren't careful this same logic could be used to restrict our access to home defense, not to mention countless other freedoms restricted in the name of safety.
Free Society Costs Us

Loveland, OH

#638 Sep 18, 2012
Those places you refer to oppress their entire population at the cost of those numbers you speak of. Here, we must tolerate them if we want to be considered the land of the free. Extreme measures have dramatic results that much is for sure, but if this society resorts to the same barbaric measures to accomplish such a reduction in numbers, then (we) the law abiding citizen, would pay way more than we are currently. An eye for an eye has been tried by the U.S. many years ago and it did not work. Today we struggle between retribution and rehabilitation. Forget for a minute we are talking about drugs and replace it with any commodity. As long as somebody is willing to pay for it, somebody will buy it. For deterrence to work, in must embody three basic components e.g., Certainty, Severity and Swiftness. The first is the likelihood a person will be caught, the second is that the punishment outweighs any gain the crime can produce, and the last is that the punishment comes close enough that the general public can draw for themselves a connection between the crime and punishment. This is why our death penalty does not work. We wait too long to implement it after the crime. People ask: Who did that person murder. Besides the family or close friends, most donít remember why we are putting a person to death. My point is that death, cutting a person's head off may be specific to them, but will be lost in a society that is busy with its own pursuits. Therefore, there is no easy answer, just us law abiding people that realize this is costing us and our children our future freedoms. That much is for sure.
believe wrote:
<quoted text>Good post ,Your right on the part about the individual (choosing) to not do it .What Im saying is inforcement of laws are the best way to put fear in the law breaker .Just look at middle eastern nations who enforce capital punishment ie cutting off of head or hand for stealing .Look at statistics of crimes its almost non existant in countries who enforce it,they dont let you sit around in prison for 20yrs
believe

Russell Springs, KY

#640 Sep 18, 2012
Free Society Costs Us wrote:
Those places you refer to oppress their entire population at the cost of those numbers you speak of. Here, we must tolerate them if we want to be considered the land of the free. Extreme measures have dramatic results that much is for sure, but if this society resorts to the same barbaric measures to accomplish such a reduction in numbers, then (we) the law abiding citizen, would pay way more than we are currently. An eye for an eye has been tried by the U.S. many years ago and it did not work. Today we struggle between retribution and rehabilitation. Forget for a minute we are talking about drugs and replace it with any commodity. As long as somebody is willing to pay for it, somebody will buy it. For deterrence to work, in must embody three basic components e.g., Certainty, Severity and Swiftness. The first is the likelihood a person will be caught, the second is that the punishment outweighs any gain the crime can produce, and the last is that the punishment comes close enough that the general public can draw for themselves a connection between the crime and punishment. This is why our death penalty does not work. We wait too long to implement it after the crime. People ask: Who did that person murder. Besides the family or close friends, most donít remember why we are putting a person to death. My point is that death, cutting a person's head off may be specific to them, but will be lost in a society that is busy with its own pursuits. Therefore, there is no easy answer, just us law abiding people that realize this is costing us and our children our future freedoms. That much is for sure.
<quoted text>
I respect your point. somewhat true if dealing with logical people, but we are not.What we are dealing with are pure criminals that have no quames about spending time in prison ,because it has become a joke .Most are better off in prison/jail. 3 meals a day ,lay around & watch tv ,dont have to work ,free medical ,free dental,free education & on & on all on our dime .It has to stop .We cannot continue this endless merry-go-round ,it always ends up back where we started .We must start enforcing punishments & maybe just maybe they will not commit as many crimes .
This is my point

Loveland, OH

#641 Sep 20, 2012
I respect your point as well, but you speak of enforcement as a solution because that leads to a punishment. However, punishment is where we (society) is supposedly stopping future behavior. Yet, you then say it is not working because some are better off there than at home and both are true. So say cops do their job better, and even stiffer punishments are given. Without throwing away the key, back on the street they go. Seems that this cycle is not working, the type of punishment that is we are doing. How about this, we work to find out what the malfunction is at home and attempt to fix that. That way, perhaps the merry-go-round stops and we do not have to pay to just let inmates just sit around and return time after time. For example, we put them to work, train them a skill, and partner with companies that need workers that will work cheap. Once their sentence is over this time, they have a job ready for them so that rather than their return trip to jail/or prison, they may join society in conformity that of working for a living just like one of us. If you were to ask a show of hands in a prison/jail of how many do not have education you would see that over seventy percent do not even have a high school education. But now we want to put these same people back on the street with a criminal record, no education, and no skills- but we then expect them to succeed like the rest of us? Personally I don't think they have a chance. They are going to repeat exactly what they were doing, because that is all they know. Break the cycle and the merry-go-back may not happen. That is the only real chance we have of stopping our criminals from continuing to be criminals. You write well and itís a very complicated thing to control or change behavior- as you can see for yourself. Thanks for the response.
believe wrote:
<quoted text>I respect your point. somewhat true if dealing with logical people, but we are not.What we are dealing with are pure criminals that have no quames about spending time in prison ,because it has become a joke .Most are better off in prison/jail. 3 meals a day ,lay around & watch tv ,dont have to work ,free medical ,free dental,free education & on & on all on our dime .It has to stop .We cannot continue this endless merry-go-round ,it always ends up back where we started .We must start enforcing punishments & maybe just maybe they will not commit as many crimes .
carpenter

Russell Springs, KY

#642 Sep 20, 2012
This is my point wrote:
I respect your point as well, but you speak of enforcement as a solution because that leads to a punishment. However, punishment is where we (society) is supposedly stopping future behavior. Yet, you then say it is not working because some are better off there than at home and both are true. So say cops do their job better, and even stiffer punishments are given. Without throwing away the key, back on the street they go. Seems that this cycle is not working, the type of punishment that is we are doing. How about this, we work to find out what the malfunction is at home and attempt to fix that. That way, perhaps the merry-go-round stops and we do not have to pay to just let inmates just sit around and return time after time. For example, we put them to work, train them a skill, and partner with companies that need workers that will work cheap. Once their sentence is over this time, they have a job ready for them so that rather than their return trip to jail/or prison, they may join society in conformity that of working for a living just like one of us. If you were to ask a show of hands in a prison/jail of how many do not have education you would see that over seventy percent do not even have a high school education. But now we want to put these same people back on the street with a criminal record, no education, and no skills- but we then expect them to succeed like the rest of us? Personally I don't think they have a chance. They are going to repeat exactly what they were doing, because that is all they know. Break the cycle and the merry-go-back may not happen. That is the only real chance we have of stopping our criminals from continuing to be criminals. You write well and itís a very complicated thing to control or change behavior- as you can see for yourself. Thanks for the response.
<quoted text>
Good point ,but You have to admit we have made huge strides in the educational relm far as prisons go .We are spending more than ever on these programs ,but it seems not to make much difference . most return despite the programs they have completed .Your right about family/environment ect beeing contributing factors ,that beeing said most also return to that same environment because its the lifestyle they are comfortable in .We have to as bad as it sounds conclude that almost all are going to commit more crimes if released ,Dont like to judge but we have to also be realistic that some are just going to be carrer criminals no matter what we do .

“I been hangin' on every word.”

Since: Sep 10

Location hidden

#643 Sep 20, 2012
carpenter wrote:
<quoted text>Good point ,but You have to admit we have made huge strides in the educational relm far as prisons go .We are spending more than ever on these programs ,but it seems not to make much difference . most return despite the programs they have completed .Your right about family/environment ect beeing contributing factors ,that beeing said most also return to that same environment because its the lifestyle they are comfortable in .We have to as bad as it sounds conclude that almost all are going to commit more crimes if released ,Dont like to judge but we have to also be realistic that some are just going to be carrer criminals no matter what we do .
Yet we have the largest incarcerated rate of any civilized nation...And those who have done nothing else wrong in their life but smoke pot/do other recreational drugs emerge from prison not as stoners, but as individuals who have been taught to mistrust police, barred from being employed anywhere good, banned from federal student loans, and given few real options.
carpenter

Russell Springs, KY

#644 Sep 20, 2012
Kick Brass wrote:
<quoted text>
Yet we have the largest incarcerated rate of any civilized nation...And those who have done nothing else wrong in their life but smoke pot/do other recreational drugs emerge from prison not as stoners, but as individuals who have been taught to mistrust police, barred from being employed anywhere good, banned from federal student loans, and given few real options.
I get what your saying ,but why would they mistrust police?because they were arrested for commiting a crime ? second No one is in PRISON for just smoking pot .maybe a night in jail but thats the most. usaully just a fine .Third ,they gave up all their rights by commiting felonies ,everyone knows thats what happens when you step over that line .So that beeing said just dont commit crimes pretty simple .
drugs

Garza GarcŪa, Mexico

#645 Sep 20, 2012
We must remember as well that we are not dealing with normal people when referring to drug dealers. These people have no qualms about killing anyone who gets in their way to profit from someone elseís weakness. They also do not care about someoneís well being when selling them drugs. This results in loss of life to many innocent people who just got caught in the crossfire. You may stand a chance of reforming a casual pot smoker but after a certain line is crossed there is no reform. We have seen it to many times in our rehabilitation system.

“I been hangin' on every word.”

Since: Sep 10

Location hidden

#646 Sep 20, 2012
carpenter wrote:
<quoted text>I get what your saying ,but why would they mistrust police?because they were arrested for commiting a crime ? second No one is in PRISON for just smoking pot .maybe a night in jail but thats the most. usaully just a fine .Third ,they gave up all their rights by commiting felonies ,everyone knows thats what happens when you step over that line .So that beeing said just dont commit crimes pretty simple .
The second time you're found with marijuana of any amount (even a joint) the penalty hits $5,000 and between 1 and 10 years in jail. Yes, just for pot. And if you've got someone who buys in bulk because he wants to reduce the chance of getting caught doing a deal, that person could go away for a decade for the first offense (an amount that suggests an intent to distribute).

The "drug war" hasn't failed--we've failed to identify the right targets. We're taking kids who are fresh out of high school who've made bad decisions and using the prison system to transform them into hardened criminals.
carpenter

Russell Springs, KY

#647 Sep 20, 2012
Kick Brass wrote:
<quoted text>
The second time you're found with marijuana of any amount (even a joint) the penalty hits $5,000 and between 1 and 10 years in jail. Yes, just for pot. And if you've got someone who buys in bulk because he wants to reduce the chance of getting caught doing a deal, that person could go away for a decade for the first offense (an amount that suggests an intent to distribute).
The "drug war" hasn't failed--we've failed to identify the right targets. We're taking kids who are fresh out of high school who've made bad decisions and using the prison system to transform them into hardened criminals.
I respectfully disagree ,on the grounds of what you stated you said SECOND time .meaning this person knew the penalty but continued to commit the crime anyway .Most transactions are for one thing MONEY .It all boiles down to economics dealers are in it for nothing more than that .Most are not willing to make an honest living given the chance ,because they have this want it now mantality but dont want to wait or care who they hurt or kill to get it .That is why most never rehabilitate its the greed + lack of morals .Its hard to teach morals if that person does not have it somewhat within them already .Goes back to what you said about young kids out of high school .thats probably the best time to catch them before they are full blown dope heads or dealers ,maybe it will deture them from that path .

“I been hangin' on every word.”

Since: Sep 10

Location hidden

#648 Sep 20, 2012
carpenter wrote:
<quoted text>I respectfully disagree ,on the grounds of what you stated you said SECOND time .meaning this person knew the penalty but continued to commit the crime anyway .Most transactions are for one thing MONEY .It all boiles down to economics dealers are in it for nothing more than that .Most are not willing to make an honest living given the chance ,because they have this want it now mantality but dont want to wait or care who they hurt or kill to get it .That is why most never rehabilitate its the greed + lack of morals .Its hard to teach morals if that person does not have it somewhat within them already .Goes back to what you said about young kids out of high school .thats probably the best time to catch them before they are full blown dope heads or dealers ,maybe it will deture them from that path .
Because nothing spells rehabilitation like being put into the system for a decade because you had too much of a drug that does less harm than tobacco. A drug that is actually legal in many states on a state level, but that is illegal on a federal level. People are told by their state, "It's okay, take as much as you need and stock up; because of your illness we understand that you can't get out to a dispensary very often." Then, when they are found with the drug that is the only thing that helps them bear the pain of their illness, they are told that they must spend their last years in prison.

I see a bit of a problem here.
Crimes vs punishment

Loveland, OH

#650 Sep 21, 2012
Most criminal behavior is motivated by gain; whatever that may be. However, when weighed agains punishment, you are refering to rational choice theory. Meaning a person weighs gain against punishment. For most rational people, there is no amount of gain worth their freedom, reputation, or the like. When dealing with illrational people, they only weigh gain against whether they think they can get away with the crime. Now I know that sounds bogus; probably because you are a rational person. However, that is how these individuals think and weigh their crimes against the punishment. This is where our police have the greatest chance of making a difference, not with apprehention, but with deterrance; which is what I spoke of earlier. Make it harder, and the crime is abandoned as being too risky. Punishment is not a factor until apprehention.
carpenter wrote:
<quoted text>I respectfully disagree ,on the grounds of what you stated you said SECOND time .meaning this person knew the penalty but continued to commit the crime anyway .Most transactions are for one thing MONEY .It all boiles down to economics dealers are in it for nothing more than that .Most are not willing to make an honest living given the chance ,because they have this want it now mantality but dont want to wait or care who they hurt or kill to get it .That is why most never rehabilitate its the greed + lack of morals .Its hard to teach morals if that person does not have it somewhat within them already .Goes back to what you said about young kids out of high school .thats probably the best time to catch them before they are full blown dope heads or dealers ,maybe it will deture them from that path .
Crimes vs punishment

Loveland, OH

#651 Sep 21, 2012
continued:

For deterrence to work, in must embody three basic components e.g., Certainty, Severity and Swiftness. The first is the likelihood a person will be caught (the police i mentioned above), the second is that the punishment outweighs any gain the crime can produce, and the last is that the punishment comes close enough that the general public can draw for themselves a connection between the crime and punishment.

Since: Jul 11

Lexington, KY

#652 Sep 21, 2012
what kind of crime is it to be stupid?

“I been hangin' on every word.”

Since: Sep 10

Location hidden

#654 Sep 22, 2012
Marijuana is closer to caffeine or chocolate than it is to cocaine and meth. It can create an emotional dependency--the same as being "addicted" to your significant other, for example. It doesn't create a chemical dependency--where your body requires it to achieve a semblance of homeostasis.

So from a perspective of the amount of damage it can/can't do, and the fact that now it even appears to stop the metastasizing of cancer cells (read: it freaking CURES cancer), it seems like we really need to lay off attacking it.
Insane Clown Posse

Jamestown, KY

#655 Sep 22, 2012
the main reason people use meth is because it is so cheap. if we legalized pot and suboxone they would be the cheapest. ask any cop: "Ever been attacked by somebody on suboxone or smoking pot? Answer: Never. "How about alcohol, meth, crack?" Answer: "All the time".

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