buku

Oak Ridge, TN

#1 Apr 20, 2009
anybody like em,anybody finding em.
friends of friends

Walland, TN

#2 Apr 20, 2009
i only learned about them on the internet they look like christmas trees would really like to try one. i hear chris at Otis elderages knows about them.
Possum

United States

#3 Apr 20, 2009
friends of friends wrote:
i only learned about them on the internet they look like christmas trees would really like to try one. i hear chris at Otis elderages knows about them.
Be sure you know what you have! I've eaten them and they are good,but I understand there are some that look like them,and they can kill you.I wish I knew how to identify them.I'm thinking about trying to find a mushroom book and carrying it with me when I go hunting them.Good luck and bon appetit.

“Ow3n”

Since: Oct 07

American Computer Techs

#4 Apr 20, 2009
There's a great book named "Mushrooms Demystified", which very clearly details the differences between all of the edible mushrooms and the non-edible ones. Makes identification far safer and has a lot of interesting accompanying information along with it.

Since: Jun 08

Location hidden

#5 Apr 20, 2009
My hubby is a dryland fish professional. He gathers them up using an onion bag ((like the ones you get onions in at the grocery)) He finds 4 different kinds, I believe. I'm not sure because I am afraid of eating them and I won't eat them. He just laughs at me and says that's more for him!!! This is what he does: He takes the mushrooms, cleans them, then rolls them in breadcrumbs. Then he takes and freezes them on a baking sheet. When they are frozen he puts them in a vacuum sealer, seals them up and they are ready to eat. Again, I am afraid to eat them because I have this belief that they will cross-pollinate with some poison mushroom and that will be the end of me. I have heard people say if you see hairy like fibers inside of them, they are poison. I will stay with traditional mushrooms. No need in hastening my time!!! I agree with Ow3n, the book about edible mushrooms would be the best source for identifying them. But yes, they are "in season" right now.
Hardtimes

AOL

#6 Apr 20, 2009
buku also posted this in the Sneedville forum, where I commented.
Yes, I know what morchella (morels) are and I've had them years ago...but, for my part, give me a good mess of "wetland" fish any day than dryland fungus "fish"!

Dryland fishing: there is a little grub that lives in a hole in the ground less than the diameter of a pencil. Stick a straw down in there and wait for it to pop up...then pull it out quickly...there is your "fish"---a little grub! LOL!

“you have to begin to start”

Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#7 Apr 20, 2009
we need to get into the truffle business and no not the candies. we could get rich off one box lmao...a shaving is 100.00 off one.
Possum

United States

#8 Apr 21, 2009
rog-vegas citizen wrote:
we need to get into the truffle business and no not the candies. we could get rich off one box lmao...a shaving is 100.00 off one.
Don't they use hogs to find truffles in France? Seems like I read that somewhere.I always wanted to taste one,just to see why people would pay all that money for them.I guess if the Golden Corral don't have them,I ain't gonna be eating any:)
Possum

United States

#9 Apr 21, 2009
Ow3n wrote:
There's a great book named "Mushrooms Demystified", which very clearly details the differences between all of the edible mushrooms and the non-edible ones. Makes identification far safer and has a lot of interesting accompanying information along with it.
Thank you, sir.

“you have to begin to start”

Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#10 Apr 21, 2009
Possum wrote:
<quoted text>Don't they use hogs to find truffles in France? Seems like I read that somewhere.I always wanted to taste one,just to see why people would pay all that money for them.I guess if the Golden Corral don't have them,I ain't gonna be eating any:)
yes there they do there is somewhere in NC that grows them and they have a dog that sniffs them out.

“you have to begin to start”

Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#11 Apr 21, 2009
Possum wrote:
<quoted text>Don't they use hogs to find truffles in France? Seems like I read that somewhere.I always wanted to taste one,just to see why people would pay all that money for them.I guess if the Golden Corral don't have them,I ain't gonna be eating any:)
oh and they are good. I have ate them also in truffle butter. its expensive but very delicious!
Phil Goodson

Kingsport, TN

#12 Apr 26, 2009
This has been the best year for morels in a long time. I have found close to 300 of them this spring. My turkey hun ting season was a bust but the mushroom season was very productive. I have found 4 different types this year. There is your very common black morel. then there is a free moon morel. After the blacks the greys and the yellows will start. All have a slightly different taste. My recipe is to get a good mess and then clean them overnight in salt water. Lay on a paper towel and let dry. Slice in half. Dip in a egg wash and then cover in crushed Ritz or Townhouse crackers , the ones with the butter flavor. Fry in a skillet .The use of butter will give them a better flavor. MMMMM good.

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