When will the next 787 burn?
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Bushwhacker

Minneapolis, MN

#25 Apr 28, 2013
So has Boeing invent a new welding process for the attachment of the vent tube to the stainless steel battery box? OR did they use mechanical attachent?

Titanium reacts readily with air, moisture, grease, dirt, refractories, and most other metals to form brittle compounds. Reaction of titanium with gases and fluxes makes common welding processes such as gas welding, shielded metal arc, flux cored arc, and submerged arc welding unsuitable. Likewise, welding titanium to most dissimilar metals is not feasible, because titanium forms brittle compounds with most other metals; however, titanium can be welded to zirconium, tantalum and niobium.
Bushwhacked

Minneapolis, MN

#27 Apr 28, 2013
Bushwhacker wrote:
You can weld stainless, are you completely STOOPID ???? LMAOROTFU~!
Both Etheopian Airlines and Gay Slewsie say the 787 is safe. What more proof does anyone need?
Bushwhacker

Minneapolis, MN

#29 Apr 28, 2013
Bushwhacked wrote:
<quoted text>
Both Etheopian Airlines and Gay Slewsie say the 787 is safe. What more proof does anyone need?
The make good test passengers.

Gay Slewsie is just worthless.
Bushwhacked

Minneapolis, MN

#31 Apr 28, 2013
Bushwhacker wrote:
<quoted text>Proof you're really stupid ?? Ethiopian peon... As for gay, you wish, you've been nose to my butt for weeks, right ???
Both Ethiopian Airlines and Gay Slewsie say the 787 is safe. What more proof does anyone need?
Bushwhacker

Seattle, WA

#34 Apr 29, 2013
Perhaps, if you were non-stupid, instead of a non-starter. People would pay attention to you ??

Nope, blather about 6 months, on a battery rework done in February.

Yeah, I wrote rework and so did Boeing, boi.

Boeing said on Monday that the first flight test of its reworked battery system for the 787 Dreamliner went "according to plan," enabling it to move on to formal testing.

The company said it would analyze the results of several weeks of testing, which included blowing up the batteries in labs, and then forward the results to the Federal Aviation Administration, probably early next week. Aviation analysts said the F.A.A., which has overseen the testing, could approve the changes later this month if no other problems surface, and the planes, which have been grounded since mid-January, could be flying again in May.

Gee, "6 months and never" moved to May ????

You American job haters/teabaggers need new watches, sundials ain't working...
non-starter

Saint Paul, MN

#35 Apr 30, 2013
The 787's travails hit front pages when two lithium-ion batteries overheated in January, leaking fumes into cabins and prompting regulators to ground the fleet worldwide.

Without knowing the cause of the meltdowns, Boeing altered the 787's battery to make it less prone to heat buildup. It also redesigned the charger, and added a stainless-steel box capable of containing an explosion and venting fumes outside the jet. Boeing said these fixes would prevent fire or smoke from ever entering the cabin or compromising the plane.

Under questioning last week, the company said it would more rigorously challenge its test assumptions in the future, and that its analysis of the problem could change as more facts become known.

"If we get to the point of understanding specifically what the cause was, then we'd be in a better position to understand those assumptions," Boeing's chief 787 engineer, Mike Sinnett, said at the NTSB hearing on April 23.

The NTSB hearings also provided clues to the safety board's potential recommendations. Questions from NTSB Chairman Deborah Hersman revealed that the FAA had 25 full-time people supervising the 787 program, compared with about 900 at Boeing, many of whom are authorized to sign approvals on the FAA's behalf. The ratio could prompt the NTSB to recommend more oversight, possibly complicating future approvals.

"Even more care will be taken the next time something relatively unknown is introduced into the system," said George Hamlin, an aerospace consultant, referring to the lithium-ion batteries that overheated.

"We don't know what caused it," he added. "Therefore, we don't know if it could recur."

http://news.yahoo.com/analysis-787-crisis-ris...
Bushwhacker

Seattle, WA

#36 Apr 30, 2013
Perhaps, if you were non-stupid, instead of a non-starter. People would pay attention to you ??

Nope, blather about 6 months, on a battery rework done in February.

Yeah, I wrote rework and so did Boeing, boi.

Boeing said on Monday that the first flight test of its reworked battery system for the 787 Dreamliner went "according to plan," enabling it to move on to formal testing.

The company said it would analyze the results of several weeks of testing, which included blowing up the batteries in labs, and then forward the results to the Federal Aviation Administration, probably early next week. Aviation analysts said the F.A.A., which has overseen the testing, could approve the changes later this month if no other problems surface, and the planes, which have been grounded since mid-January, could be flying again in May.

Gee, "6 months and never" moved to May ????

You American job haters/teabaggers need new watches, sundials ain't working...

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