Documentary spotlights closing of Ohi...

Documentary spotlights closing of Ohio GM plant

There are 11 comments on the Columbus Dispatch story from Aug 19, 2009, titled Documentary spotlights closing of Ohio GM plant. In it, Columbus Dispatch reports that:

One is staining his deck. Another is studying Web design. A third has given up off-roading to save money.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Columbus Dispatch.

tom the traveler

United States

#1 Aug 19, 2009
The article says ""The technology out here in the real world just passed me by," said Hurst, acknowledging that he doesn't even own a computer."

The fact is, the entire digital era has passed the entire state of Ohio by. If it is digital, Ohio has nothing to do with it.

No movies, no search engines, no cell phone manufacturing, no routers, no medical equipment, no info systems, no flat panel displays, no fiber optics, no gaming, nothing.

The last innovative thing to come from Ohio was the Limited stores, Victoria Secret and Abercrombie and Fitch.
Concerned

Columbus, OH

#2 Aug 19, 2009
Very sad, yet predictable. I grew up in Kettering and went to school with the kids of GM workers. The loss of GM and shortly NCR will devastate Dayton and the surrounding suburbs.

What can we in Columbus learn from this? First, a city shouldn't take any of their major industries for granted. As you can read, people in Dayton always thought GM (and NCR) would be there forever, providing the tax dollars and high paying jobs to fund growing city bureaucracies. No more. And once you lose those jobs they don't come back. Can you name one Fortune 500 company that has relocated it's headquarters to Ohio?

The second lesson is about sustainability. GM paid great wages and benefits (health, retirement, etc) to it's workers that, over time, became out of step with the rest of what the guy in the article called 'the real world'. It wasn't sustainable and the company went bankrupt when the economy went south. I can't help but think that our state/local governments, and school districts are on the same track.
Sr Manufacturing Engineer

Vandalia, OH

#3 Aug 19, 2009
Are you REALLY in Akron??? Why are you still here in "the heart of it all" if it is as bad as you say it is? Oh, right. Your WIFE has a good job here, and you are a well-trained househusband/domestic partner.
tom the traveler wrote:
The article says ""The technology out here in the real world just passed me by," said Hurst, acknowledging that he doesn't even own a computer."
The fact is, the entire digital era has passed the entire state of Ohio by. If it is digital, Ohio has nothing to do with it.
No movies, no search engines, no cell phone manufacturing, no routers, no medical equipment, no info systems, no flat panel displays, no fiber optics, no gaming, nothing.
The last innovative thing to come from Ohio was the Limited stores, Victoria Secret and Abercrombie and Fitch.
Concerned

Columbus, OH

#4 Aug 19, 2009
tom the traveler wrote:
The article says ""The technology out here in the real world just passed me by," said Hurst, acknowledging that he doesn't even own a computer."
The fact is, the entire digital era has passed the entire state of Ohio by. If it is digital, Ohio has nothing to do with it.
No movies, no search engines, no cell phone manufacturing, no routers, no medical equipment, no info systems, no flat panel displays, no fiber optics, no gaming, nothing.
The last innovative thing to come from Ohio was the Limited stores, Victoria Secret and Abercrombie and Fitch.
I'm not sure about today, but in the late 80's and into the 90's, Columbus was actually a computing hub. CompuServe, Chemical Abstracts, OCLC, OSU, Batelle, and others were pioneers in data management and network capabilities. I don't know that we fully took it anywhere, but we once had a lot of innovation around here.
hartland22

Van Wert, OH

#5 Aug 19, 2009
go obama, close the automobile industry and send the jobs to mexico, where the former chrysler industry is going to open a fiat plant!
UAW worker

Kissimmee, FL

#6 Aug 19, 2009
Was a UAW worker is more appropriate. Sad for the whole state of Ohio.
Are you kidding me

Pittsburgh, PA

#9 Aug 19, 2009
It was the workers and the darn union that caused the shutdown of the plant!
Im So Shocked

Canal Winchester, OH

#10 Aug 19, 2009
Look for the union label.

These people have been sacrificed so others above them can keep their jobs, guess that throws one of the favorite terms "brothers & sisters" out the window.

Family wouldn't allow that to happen except only to save their own skin. Jobs have been fleeing Miami Valley since the early 70's and absolutely nothing has been done to stop it.

These jobs could have been saved a long time ago with the union and manufactures working side by side with new technology.
Moraine Material Girl

Dayton, OH

#11 Aug 20, 2009
I am not sure where Akron gets his info but just because we don't "manufacture" technology doesn't mean we are technologically stunted. Not every state must be "in the middle of the newest latest greatest industry" in order to be current.
Ohio has definitely rested on it's laurels and hopefully we will learn what not to do in the future. I agree that we as community have taken our Big Companies for granted and need to learn from that. The true test will be to see how we overcome the monumental blow to our town.
I would like to state for the record that most of the people working in that plant were second generation and grew up being taught the belief that we could work 30 years and get a pension. Back when we started, college wasn't necessarily the only road to travel. For those of us who are square pegs that don't fit into round holes it was a tempting alternative to go to work at the factory and still be able to raise a family and buy a home. We were young and in great shape and did not realize what a toll that plant would take on our bodies, but someone had to build the vehicles that everyone in the world drives. It amazes me that all of the drivers in the world that DO NOT physically assemble the vehicles treat us with such scorn.
We agreed to trade our physical well being to the company so they could produce thier vehicles in exchange for them taking care of us when we were too old and broken down to physically work. That was the bottom line. Not until it was too late did we realize that would not happen and then we all started contributing to private pension funds but shortly after we learned we would lose our jobs forever.
So today the survivors of the Moraine assembly plant face losing our health care (and I will be the first to say that I would rather have no health care than Government health care) and some of us (myself included) face losing our pensions. I worked there for 24 years and after GM filed bankruptcy and the US Treasury said it was okay to throw out our contracts AFTER I made good on my end of the deal it looks like GM will get away without having to make good on thiers.
I don't really care about the haters that leave comments like slob and whoever else that was but I will pray for them because that is the only thing that will change thier hearts. What a sad way to live, in so much anger.
Today I am choosing joy. I will pick myself up by the bootstraps and move on because I want to be and even better version of myself and the majority of the people I proudly call my GM family are doing the same thing!
Are you kidding me

Pittsburgh, PA

#13 Aug 24, 2009
Moraine Material Girl wrote:
I am not sure where Akron gets his info but just because we don't "manufacture" technology doesn't mean we are technologically stunted. Not every state must be "in the middle of the newest latest greatest industry" in order to be current.
Ohio has definitely rested on it's laurels and hopefully we will learn what not to do in the future. I agree that we as community have taken our Big Companies for granted and need to learn from that. The true test will be to see how we overcome the monumental blow to our town.
I would like to state for the record that most of the people working in that plant were second generation and grew up being taught the belief that we could work 30 years and get a pension. Back when we started, college wasn't necessarily the only road to travel. For those of us who are square pegs that don't fit into round holes it was a tempting alternative to go to work at the factory and still be able to raise a family and buy a home. We were young and in great shape and did not realize what a toll that plant would take on our bodies, but someone had to build the vehicles that everyone in the world drives. It amazes me that all of the drivers in the world that DO NOT physically assemble the vehicles treat us with such scorn.
We agreed to trade our physical well being to the company so they could produce thier vehicles in exchange for them taking care of us when we were too old and broken down to physically work. That was the bottom line. Not until it was too late did we realize that would not happen and then we all started contributing to private pension funds but shortly after we learned we would lose our jobs forever.
So today the survivors of the Moraine assembly plant face losing our health care (and I will be the first to say that I would rather have no health care than Government health care) and some of us (myself included) face losing our pensions. I worked there for 24 years and after GM filed bankruptcy and the US Treasury said it was okay to throw out our contracts AFTER I made good on my end of the deal it looks like GM will get away without having to make good on thiers.
I don't really care about the haters that leave comments like slob and whoever else that was but I will pray for them because that is the only thing that will change thier hearts. What a sad way to live, in so much anger.
Today I am choosing joy. I will pick myself up by the bootstraps and move on because I want to be and even better version of myself and the majority of the people I proudly call my GM family are doing the same thing!
How can you sit back and say that you never saw this coming??? I know several people who worked in that factory, and 10 years ago I told them to get their shizzle together and get ready for the blow, save up some money and get some education. Do you think they listened? Hell no, and now I'm paying for their education, I'm paying for them to sit at home and sulk about not being able to afford to eat, and I'm probably paying for you to sit at home and point the finger. It is YOUR responsibility to be aware of what is going on around you. You cannot say that "management never told us" or "management was blowing smoke up our rears" because everyone outside of the auto industry for MANY years has been saying that this day will come. Now it's here, and we all are paying for it. There's no way in hell that you should have been making 30 bucks plus an hour for the jobs that you did, there's no way in hell that you should have let the unions decide your fate, which you did, and sitting with the "poor us" attitude is going to get you nowhere. I feel for all of you who lost your jobs, but you all made a bad choice in deciding to let others make decisions for you and not taking charge of yourselves on an individual basis.
steve

Fredericktown, OH

#15 Oct 15, 2009
amazing

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