AquaAlliance denied injunction for water transfers, presses on

Jul 13, 2014 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: Chico Enterprise-Record

The federal District Court in Fresno denied a legal effort by Chico's AquAlliance and the California Sportfishing Protection Alliance to stop water transfers this year.

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1 - 20 of 25 Comments Last updated Wednesday Aug 13
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Krankenstein

Glenn, CA

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#1
Jul 14, 2014
 

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The fish huggers lose again! Let the water and THE MONEY flow!!! Its only a matter of time before LA comes up here and buys all the water from our broke and broken down local governments who will then be able to spend more on the BUMS like giving them free food, alcohol and a bedroll for under a bridge!

I say "F"orget the fish, help the BUMS!
Barry

Paradise, CA

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#2
Jul 15, 2014
 

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The Oroville-Thermalito Complex is a group of facilities, structures, and reservoirs located in and around the city of Oroville in Butte County, California. The complex serves not only as a regional water conveyance and storage system, but is the headwaters for, and therefore is the most vital facility of, the California Department of Water Resources' State Water Project, the world's largest publicly built and operated water and power development and conveyance system

Lake Oroville has a maximum operating storage of 3,537,580 acre feet , which, for purposes of scale, is equal to over 1.153 trillion gallons of water!.

Why does Chico have to depend on ground water ?
The right is wrong

Sacramento, CA

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#3
Jul 15, 2014
 
Barry wrote:
The Oroville-Thermalito Complex is a group of facilities, structures, and reservoirs located in and around the city of Oroville in Butte County, California. The complex serves not only as a regional water conveyance and storage system, but is the headwaters for, and therefore is the most vital facility of, the California Department of Water Resources' State Water Project, the world's largest publicly built and operated water and power development and conveyance system
Lake Oroville has a maximum operating storage of 3,537,580 acre feet , which, for purposes of scale, is equal to over 1.153 trillion gallons of water!.
Why does Chico have to depend on ground water ?
I may be wrong butt Chico doesn't have any water rights for Feather River water.
Barry

Paradise, CA

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#4
Jul 15, 2014
 

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The right is wrong wrote:
<quoted text>
I may be wrong butt Chico doesn't have any water rights for Feather River water.
and you may now add the Tuscan Aquifer to be pumped through Jerry's twin tunnels.
ON MY BUM

Chico, CA

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#5
Jul 15, 2014
 

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I say sell the water and give the munnee to my people. we need help becuz hooch is expensive and we cant work becuz we have problems.

The city council will gladlee give us the munnee if thay can sell the water. remember, hooch is for drinkin and water is for torlets!
Sam

Paradise, CA

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#6
Jul 16, 2014
 

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It's been almost 100 years since William Mulholland stood atop an aqueduct along the Owens River and said, "There it is, take it." He was referring to a diversion channel that started piping water to Los Angeles from 200 miles away.
But it also meant that the Owens River no longer flowed into the massive Owens Lake, which quickly dried up and became one of the biggest environmental disasters in the nation.
Instead, it's a salt flat the size of San Francisco, and when the wind blows, it can churn up huge dust storms with high levels of particulates that are dangerous to breathe. That earned Owens Lake the dubious mark of being the largest single source of dust pollution in the nation. And California law leaves no ambiguity for who the responsible polluter is.
The water rights were acquired in a deceitful manner, often splitting water cooperatives and pinning neighbors against one another.
In 1970, LADWP completed a second aqueduct from Owens Valley. More surface water was diverted and groundwater was pumped to feed the aqueduct. Owens Valley springs and seeps dried and disappeared, and groundwater-dependent vegetation began to die.[
Juan

Paradise, CA

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#7
Jul 18, 2014
 

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Groundwater levels have dipped, creating well maintenance work for homeowners.
http://chicoenterpriserecord.ca.newsmemory.co...
The right is wrong

Sacramento, CA

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#8
Jul 18, 2014
 
And when the rich farmers sell their water to L.A. everyone in the region will suffer economically. I find it strange that some local chico people are in favor of the sale even though said sale will hurt 99% of the people in and around Chico.

Sams post is fact! LADWP destroied the Owens Valley economy and environment.
Jack Doff

Chico, CA

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#9
Jul 18, 2014
 

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I see the water situation as a public trust issue. LA has a large population and a real need for water. We have a smaller population and enough water to share. I don't think that water should be sold but rather shared. Between the environment and the people we need to find a way to make it work. Maybe less farming would good for the state and free up water for more important things.
Sam

Paradise, CA

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#10
Jul 18, 2014
 

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The right is wrong wrote:
<quoted text>
I may be wrong butt Chico doesn't have any water rights for Feather River water.
California provides communities and other water users within watersheds senior status over appropriative water rights in limited circumstances.[47]

Area of origin water rights parallel pueblo water rights. In both cases, water is reserved for future growth of the local community. In other words, appropriations may be subject to a water rights claim from people/government in the area of origin. That later claim would be senior despite its temporal disconnect. As a result of its pueblo rights, Los Angeles has rights to all or almost all water from the Los Angeles River. In the same way, communities along major water sources such as the Sacramento River theoretically have senior water rights to support growth despite a downstream user holding otherwise senior appropriative water rights.

Area of origin laws were passed in reaction to the controversies related to Los Angeles diverting water from the Owens Valley. Despite being on the books for generations, the area of origin statutes were not used until 2000. In addition, there currently are no court opinions regarding area of origin watershed rights.
Krankenstein

Glenn, CA

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#11
Jul 18, 2014
 

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Jack Doff wrote:
I see the water situation as a public trust issue. LA has a large population and a real need for water. We have a smaller population and enough water to share. I don't think that water should be sold but rather shared. Between the environment and the people we need to find a way to make it work. Maybe less farming would good for the state and free up water for more important things.
And where do you think food comes from, Jack?

Maybe you source your food from China and take your chances on the heavy metal content but most thinking people would prefer a different choice. Keep your nose out of business that you clearly don't understand!
Sam

Paradise, CA

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#12
Jul 18, 2014
 

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Jack Doff wrote:
I see the water situation as a public trust issue. LA has a large population and a real need for water. We have a smaller population and enough water to share. I don't think that water should be sold but rather shared. Between the environment and the people we need to find a way to make it work. Maybe less farming would good for the state and free up water for more important things.
True.
Water and water rights are among the state's divisive political issues. Lacking reliable dry season rainfall, water is limited in the most populous U.S. state. An ongoing debate is whether the state should increase the redistribution of water to its large agricultural and urban sectors, or increase conservation and preserve the natural ecosystems of the water sources.
GRANDPA NICOLAI

Paradise, CA

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#13
Jul 19, 2014
 

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Krankenstein wrote:
<quoted text>
And where do you think food comes from, Jack?
Maybe you source your food from China and take your chances on the heavy metal content but most thinking people would prefer a different choice. Keep your nose out of business that you clearly don't understand!
>
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Heavy metals KRANKY???!!!

This is the first time in six years of posting here that I hear a self styled conservative express concern about the pollution of the food supply, or pollution of any kind for that matter.

There just may be a glimmer of hope for you KRANKY, because somewhere in the darkest recesses of your mind you must know there is something good to be said about the FDA and the EPA.

The latter coming into being under President R Nixon, who in spite of Watergate was the last great conservative President.
Edit

Paradise, CA

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#14
Jul 20, 2014
 

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The folks with the political power aren’t trou­bled with the bizarreness that their water comes from hun­dreds of miles away. In the map in their minds the Sacra­mento and Feather rivers, the Owens River, Trinity River even the Colo­rado River system, are some­how viewed as flowing natu­rally and properly to the sea through the L. A. Basin and the lands south to San Diego. The people who live there feel entitled to it.
It is projected that California’s population will be almost 50 million people in the year 2020. If the prediction comes true and there is no action to increase the water supply, the difference between water demand and supply would be between 2 and 6,000,000 acre feet in the year 2020.
Sam

Paradise, CA

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#15
Jul 20, 2014
 

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Barry wrote:
The Oroville-Thermalito Complex is a group of facilities, structures, and reservoirs located in and around the city of Oroville in Butte County, California. The complex serves not only as a regional water conveyance and storage system, but is the headwaters for, and therefore is the most vital facility of, the California Department of Water Resources' State Water Project, the world's largest publicly built and operated water and power development and conveyance system
Lake Oroville has a maximum operating storage of 3,537,580 acre feet , which, for purposes of scale, is equal to over 1.153 trillion gallons of water!.
Why does Chico have to depend on ground water ?
The United Western Investigation of 1951, a study by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, assessed the feasibility of interbasin water transfers in the Western United States. In California, this plan contemplated the construction of dams on rivers draining to California's North Coast – the wild and undammed Klamath, Eel, Mad and Smith River systems – and tunnels to carry the impounded water to the Sacramento River system, where it could be diverted southwards
In the same year, State Engineer A.D. Edmonston proposed the Feather River Project, which proposed the damming of the Feather River, a tributary of the Sacramento River, for the same purpose.
The diversion of the North Coast rivers was abandoned in the plan's early stages after strong opposition from locals and concerns about the potential impact on the salmon in North Coast rivers. The California Water Plan would have to go ahead with the development of the Feather River alone, as proposed by Edmonston.
California governor Pat Brown would later say it was to "correct an accident of people and geography"
GRANDPA NICOLAI

Paradise, CA

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Jul 20, 2014
 

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Edit wrote:
The folks with the political power aren’t trou­bled with the bizarreness that their water comes from hun­dreds of miles away. In the map in their minds the Sacra­mento and Feather rivers, the Owens River, Trinity River even the Colo­rado River system, are some­how viewed as flowing natu­rally and properly to the sea through the L. A. Basin and the lands south to San Diego. The people who live there feel entitled to it.
It is projected that California’s population will be almost 50 million people in the year 2020. If the prediction comes true and there is no action to increase the water supply, the difference between water demand and supply would be between 2 and 6,000,000 acre feet in the year 2020.
>
>
Part of the answer might lie in desalination folks.

We got plenty of ocean water and although current desalination efforts are energy intensive, we could tap photovoltaics and wind energy to power the plants.

The Carlsbad desalination facility referenced in the link below is capable of purifying 50 million gallons per day and if my figuring is correct that is the equivalent of 150 some odd acre feet per day.

http://www.mercurynews.com/science/ci_2585951...
HaagenHut Now

Chico, CA

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Jul 20, 2014
 

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GRANDPA NICOLAI wrote:
<quoted text>
>
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Part of the answer might lie in desalination folks.
We got plenty of ocean water and although current desalination efforts are energy intensive, we could tap photovoltaics and wind energy to power the plants.
The Carlsbad desalination facility referenced in the link below is capable of purifying 50 million gallons per day and if my figuring is correct that is the equivalent of 150 some odd acre feet per day.
http://www.mercurynews.com/science/ci_2585951...
No. The answer lies in building more storage. The sites reservoir is a pumped storage facility concept that would not block a natural stream but would allow us to capture and store water from heavy winter runoff, potentially even reducing the flooding in some areas along the Sacramento River. Also, raising the Shasta dam by another 10 feet would create a tremendous amount more water due to the large surface area of that lake.

We have needed more storage for years but thank you to extreme environmental interests, that need has not been acted upon. There is an old saying "the best time to build a dam is 20 years ago, the next best is today."
GRANDPA NICOLAI

Paradise, CA

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#18
Jul 20, 2014
 

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HaagenHut Now wrote:
<quoted text>
No. The answer lies in building more storage. The sites reservoir is a pumped storage facility concept that would not block a natural stream but would allow us to capture and store water from heavy winter runoff, potentially even reducing the flooding in some areas along the Sacramento River. Also, raising the Shasta dam by another 10 feet would create a tremendous amount more water due to the large surface area of that lake.
We have needed more storage for years but thank you to extreme environmental interests, that need has not been acted upon. There is an old saying "the best time to build a dam is 20 years ago, the next best is today."
>
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No. Just like with investments, the answer to water shortage lies in diversification.

Storage is good, but with AGW we can no longer count on precipitation to replenish our reservoirs, therefore desalination is a viable option to supply us with much needed water.

The "EXTREME" environmental interest will have to go, just as the EXTREME" radical T bagging political interests have to go, otherwise we all will be goners!!!
right on gramps

United States

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Jul 20, 2014
 

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GRANDPA NICOLAI wrote:
<quoted text>
>
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No. Just like with investments, the answer to water shortage lies in diversification.
Storage is good, but with AGW we can no longer count on precipitation to replenish our reservoirs, therefore desalination is a viable option to supply us with much needed water.
The "EXTREME" environmental interest will have to go, just as the EXTREME" radical T bagging political interests have to go, otherwise we all will be goners!!!
You are absolutely RIGHT ON GRAMPS!

Some Regs are so CONSERVATIVE and undeniably inefficient, especially in difficult times as now, that some reform must take place. We FAIL otherwise as you so aptly observed.

Desalinization costs are PLUMMETING as the Middle East is turning to that Technology BIGTIME thus reducing the Infrastructure Plant Costs . San Diego was to try a Project, however I don't know what happened to it.

Likewise many cities with large disposal plants are beginning to Purify treated Gray Water for Human use. The return in clean pure potable water in substantial and very economic and excellent for the environment.
The right is wrong

Lincoln, CA

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Jul 20, 2014
 

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right on gramps wrote:
<quoted text>You are absolutely RIGHT ON GRAMPS!
Some Regs are so CONSERVATIVE and undeniably inefficient, especially in difficult times as now, that some reform must take place. We FAIL otherwise as you so aptly observed.
Desalinization costs are PLUMMETING as the Middle East is turning to that Technology BIGTIME thus reducing the Infrastructure Plant Costs . San Diego was to try a Project, however I don't know what happened to it.
Likewise many cities with large disposal plants are beginning to Purify treated Gray Water for Human use. The return in clean pure potable water in substantial and very economic and excellent for the environment.
A plant was built to re-claim sewer water out in Santee, east of San Diego back in the 60's. The water came out cleaner than treated tap water. There's all kinds of solutions to the problem.

Agriculture wastes more water than any other user. Drip irrigation has helped a lot. I was down by Los Banos a few weeks ago on the west side of the valley and farmers were using overhead sprinklers on a triple digit day when the wind was blowing 20mph. What a waste of water!

And why can't I USE water that goes right back into the system and then is wasted by some downstream user? 99% of the water I use is re-used by someone. 0% of the water LA gets is re-used

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