Animal shelters overcrowded

Animal shelters overcrowded

There are 91 comments on the LA Daily News story from Jul 28, 2009, titled Animal shelters overcrowded. In it, LA Daily News reports that:

A litter of kittens look from the cage at the East Valley Animal Shelter in Van Nuys, Tuesday, July 28, 2009.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at LA Daily News.

First Prev
of 5
Next Last
do journalists research

Ontario, CA

#2 Jul 28, 2009
It is saddening to think a journalist such as the one who wrote this article has someone like Judie Mancuso as an unbiased authority on the subject. Does "do your research" mean anything. Mancuso is one sided - and that is against the animals when you get down to the bottom line. The economy is a big factor of course, but the mandatory spay and neuter bill is the main cause of the increase in animal surrender. People can't afford any more animal expense. Those who are repsonsible are already altering animals that need be. Almost all cat owners spay and neuter as cat behavior is undesirable otherwise. Anyone who has actually researched the subject will know these facts.......
Los Angeles Native

North Hollywood, CA

#3 Jul 28, 2009
This looks like a story about cats. Nothing said directly about dogs. One has to assume that cats are doing a lot of breeding out there. Comparing dogs and cats is like comparing apples and oranges? The reproductive cycles of these animals are different. Feral cats have always been a problem and probably always will be. To blame the upsurgence of animals in the shelters on the economy has some truth to it; however that is NOT the whole story in Los Angeles. What has happened to their community out reach program? How much education are they doing? Rather than listen to the MSN fanatics rant about the need for mandatory spay and neutering laws why not do something good for the community and again offer clinics for the pets. It is difficult to see animals euthanized but the only way to stop that is to make it easy for people to keep their pets and Mandatory of anything laws are always punitive and they do not get the support of the public. So your approach should be how can I help people keep their animals without putting the authorities on them and burdening our society with more debt with a law that has been proven to NOT be successful in any community where it has been enacted. Where can we get funding to help these people keept their animals?
CJX

AOL

#4 Jul 28, 2009
Where is low cost spay neuter? I had to pay almost $800 to have my dog spayed. How can anyone afford that in this economy? Not everyone who has a gun shoots people with it. Not everyone who has an unaltered dog or cat allows it to breed. The mandatory spay neuter only affected those already obeying the laws.
Too Many

AOL

#5 Jul 29, 2009
Check out how many ads the Daily News has for dogs and puppies for sale. How many of those ads have the required breeders permit and intact dog license? The Daily News should be a responsible news organization and refuse ads that aren't in compliance.
dogncatlover

Los Angeles, CA

#6 Jul 29, 2009
It's patent nonsense to blame the increased euthanasia on the spay/neuter law. That's the same drivel breeders (who typically are doing everything they can to avoid being regulated and paying taxes on their animal sales) use to fight local and state spay/neuter proposals.

The reality is that shelters up and down the state are experiencing the same surge in impounds and euthanasias whether they have spay/neuter laws or not. Statewise statistics prove that beyond a shadow of a doubt.

And only starry-eyed no-kill wannabe's think there's some guru out there who will magically fix problems that are obviously more difficult and complex than their simplistic minds can fathom. Still, insulting those who are trying to do the heavy lifting and pimping for their favorite guru is about all they're equipped to do.
I-m Hungry

Redondo Beach, CA

#7 Jul 29, 2009
How about sell the ones their going to kill for food?

Lots of people are hungry these days and there isn't much difference between a tender plump kitten and a Cornish Hen, a small rabbit, a duck or a chicken. Surely the homeless would appreciate a free meal packed with mouth watering meat.

Think of all the money it would save that could be used to help offset our state's budget, and pay for things like medicine for children. Who doesn't want to help children???

Not only would people be fed and the meat bring in money, but they would't have to pay disposal costs for all those animals, that's big money too.

They might even make more if they sold some of them to test labs and then more of them wouldn't have to be raised just so they could be sold to those labs. Thats another win win, and the boost to medicine would help even more kids. Would you really rather see more animals and kids die like happens the way we're doing it now?

Would you rather know that Fluffy turned into maggot food in some overflowing landfill, or know that Fluffy's last act was to put a smile on a hungry kid?
Susan Beam

Westminster, CA

#8 Jul 29, 2009
Instead of putting down innocent animals in our shelters, why don't we put down all the horrible two-legged monsters and cretins we have in our city. Crack and meth white trash in Lancaster and all those drug addicted ni88ers in downtown Los Angeles --- their deaths would free up city and state aid to them, which could be applied to helping out our unfortunate animal friends.
Anamouse

Redondo Beach, CA

#9 Jul 29, 2009
I bet a lot of people are having to choose between feeding their kids and feeding a cat, so they get rid of the cat.
Times are tough
KittyLover720

North Hollywood, CA

#10 Jul 29, 2009
What I don't get is when someone brings in a litter of kittens, they clearly have an unspayed female cat at home. Why doesn't the shelter offer to fix the mom cat for free if she is brought in? This is called direct marketing and it works. OR ask them if they want to get the mom fixed, take their information and then give it to Stray Cat Alliance, Fixnation, Kitten Rescue, or any other of a dozen groups who will happily follow up to stop the cat from breeding.
KittyLover720

North Hollywood, CA

#11 Jul 29, 2009
Wow what a bunch of idiotic comments that are posted above mine. Amazing that I-m Hungry and do journalists research have the intelligence to type, turn on a computer and use the Internets! Your heads areupyourasses!!!
CJX

AOL

#12 Jul 29, 2009
Quote from article: "Davis said it may take three to five years to see results from the city's spay/neuter ordinance. Meanwhile, she said gradual improvements are being made."

That is nonsense. The average breeding cycle for a cat is 4 months, for a dog it is 6 months. If Mandatory Spay/Neuter were the answer, you would have seen astounding results in the first year. Instead, you have seen just the opposite because people who previously licensed their pets cannot afford the surgery in these economic times. Many people are capable of owning intact dogs and cats and not letting them breed.
Do you Question Me

Chino Hills, CA

#13 Jul 29, 2009
I-m Hungry wrote:
How about sell the ones their going to kill for food?
Lots of people are hungry these days and there isn't much difference between a tender plump kitten and a Cornish Hen, a small rabbit, a duck or a chicken. Surely the homeless would appreciate a free meal packed with mouth watering meat.
Think of all the money it would save that could be used to help offset our state's budget, and pay for things like medicine for children. Who doesn't want to help children???
Not only would people be fed and the meat bring in money, but they would't have to pay disposal costs for all those animals, that's big money too.
They might even make more if they sold some of them to test labs and then more of them wouldn't have to be raised just so they could be sold to those labs. Thats another win win, and the boost to medicine would help even more kids. Would you really rather see more animals and kids die like happens the way we're doing it now?
Would you rather know that Fluffy turned into maggot food in some overflowing landfill, or know that Fluffy's last act was to put a smile on a hungry kid?
You are sick to suggest that we sell pet animals for food.
I-m Hungry

Redondo Beach, CA

#14 Jul 29, 2009
Do you Question Me wrote:
<quoted text>
You are sick to suggest that we sell pet animals for food.
Are you a Vegan?

A lot of kids and their parents might disagree with you and not be very understanding if you're not. If you'r not please tell me why it's ok for you to a chicken that was raised in deplorible conditions just so that you could enjoy the taste of chicken, instead of eating other foods that have no feelings; but it's not ok for someone else whose a lot more hungry than you obviously are, to eat a cat that probably led a very comfortable life and is going to get killed whether or not someone other than worms, eats it after it's dead.

Do you get just as disgusted when people eat chickens and cows? If you ever raised a cow yourself you might be surprised how much some of those animals have in common with your pets. They get excied to see you, love to be petted and have loving eyes, but they also feed lots of hungry people.

In many parts of the U.S.A. they,(government employeed workers), regularly use road kill to feed poor people, so this isn't exactly the worst they could get. At least we know it's fresh.
Rescue Veteran

Santa Ana, CA

#15 Jul 29, 2009
This is a direct result of mandatory spay and neuter. People cannot afford to have their pets altered. Instead of paying fees, they will dump them in the shelter or let them wander off and not claim them. Mandatory spay and neuter increases shelter intake.
George W Bush

Hawthorne, CA

#16 Jul 29, 2009
Obama just apointed MR.ED as animal czar ..so this problem should be fixed in no time ..yes we can..yes we can
A former teacher

Rancho Cordova, CA

#17 Jul 29, 2009
CJX wrote:
If Mandatory Spay/Neuter were the answer, you would have seen astounding results in the first year. Instead, you have seen just the opposite because people who previously licensed their pets cannot afford the surgery in these economic times. Many people are capable of owning intact dogs and cats and not letting them breed.
Yes, many people are capable of keeping their intact pets from breeding, but it's obvious that not enough of them are doing so. It's people's irresponsibility, not the spay/neuter law, that is at fault here.
SuS

Encino, CA

#18 Jul 29, 2009
Yes, it's expensive to see to the dietary and health needs of a pet. Pets are a huge responsibility. Anyone who doesn't take their responsibility seriously - including spaying/neutering - should not have a pet until a time comes when they can meet its needs better.

Certainly we need all the community support and resources possible to help people fulfill their responsibility, but we also need to be real.

At the same time we also need property owners to adopt more humane policies on pets. Pet-friendly apartments are few and far between. If more rentals permitted pets, fewer people would be giving up a family member when they are forced to move. Given the economy, accepting pets is a small but meaningful thing landlords can do to make their properties more desirable.
Patty Shenker

Santa Monica, CA

#20 Jul 29, 2009
Thank you, Dana, for pointing out the devastation that is happening at our shelters. As you pointed out, it is only going to get worse now that our compassionate governor is shortening the holding period for pets in the shelters to 72 hours! Meanwhile, the cat & dog breeders are spending thousands of dollars on ridiculous billboards that are untrue, fear-mongering absolute nonsense! SB250, the spay/neuter bill by Senator Florez, is part of the solution to pet overpopulation. It doesn't make owning a pet a crime at all; it only requires an owner to buy an "intact license". The real crime here is the fact that over 500,000 (and growing) pets are housed and killed because of lack of homes at the taxpayers expense of 250 million dollars. So don't buy dogs & cats, adopt, and definitely don't buy the breeders, libertarians and others bullshit about this tragedy. Cat & dog breeders are getting away with murder! Spay/neuter laws appeal to those of us who care about all the dogs & cats, not just our own!
Pemmom

Boise, ID

#21 Jul 29, 2009
Did anyone actually READ the article. The problem is UNOWNED cats! Why hasn't an aggressive TNR program been put in place? It would be much cheaper and would indeed lower the incidence of CATS! CATS, not dogs, people, CATS - UNOWNED cats. How does that translate into irresponsible breeders and owners? Obviously reading and critical thinking skills are sinking to a new low.
Madame Meow

Castro Valley, CA

#22 Jul 29, 2009
We need a shift in the thinking of rental housing owners, too. Up here in Northern Ca, many people have been forced to move due to the economy, and rentals generally don't allow pets- period. We should require landlords to allow small pets provided the pet is spayed/neutered and a reasonable deposit is placed.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 5
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Rescue Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Rescue group takes in mutilated pup injured by ... Apr 24 Julie Jane 1
News Kit Carson Mountain Men step back into Californ... Apr 24 Lucy Jane 1
News Bayside Church new to Auburn (Aug '08) Apr 22 Maria 22
What Is El Dorado Hills About? (Mar '08) Apr 18 happyhomeowner 21
Follow the money in El Dorado County (Oct '14) Apr 11 ENTER USERNAME 2
Nood Senior Dancing In Park at Night Apr 10 Mollusca 1
News So Cal vs. Nor Cal: The battle rages on (Oct '07) Apr 7 surferdude3328 64
More from around the web

Personal Finance

Rescue Mortgages