New sex offender tracking program kee...

New sex offender tracking program keeps residents in the know

There are 30 comments on the San Bernardino County Sun story from Dec 1, 2009, titled New sex offender tracking program keeps residents in the know. In it, San Bernardino County Sun reports that:

It is known as Megan's Law on steroids. The new program launched Tuesday by the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department is a wealth of information on the 3,000 or so sex offenders registered in the county.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at San Bernardino County Sun.

First Prev
of 2
Next Last
True

San Bernardino, CA

#22 Dec 5, 2009
Trust me. You don't want to live here! I moved here about 5 years ago and am so sorry I did! This is not a nice place. If you really do live in New Mexico-where your IP address shows here, you would wish you had never left there to be here-unless you like living in hell! California is not like it used to be, and this area is crime haven-gangs-druggies-rapists galore. Then there's the snobby hill, cold shoulder croud who thinks they are "better than." Lol! It must have been the water!
Truth About Sex Crimes wrote:
Just in case any one is wondering, I have relatives living in Redlands ... I don't think I would want to live there if this is the level of thought given to an issue like this.
True

San Bernardino, CA

#23 Dec 5, 2009
San Bernardino is know all over as "felony flats." the first time I heard of it was when I lived out of state. I wish I had never left! I didn't know it was near where I was moving to. I see the creep into this town too.
RPD

Redlands, CA

#24 Dec 5, 2009
Tom Fitzmaurice of Redlands Police Department gets paid $360,000. How much do you make?
wrong

San Bernardino, CA

#25 Dec 5, 2009
As a victim of a sexual preditor, I will say you are wrong. I want a registry. I am an educated woman who has spoken with many people who have been victims of sexual crimes committed by sexual preditors. Many sexual preditors are older men, not juveniles. sexual preditors can not be cured. Sexual preditors keep committing sexual offenses going from one victim to another. Most sexual preditors are not caught though. But for those who are on a registry, I want to have the ability to know where they live so I don't live in the areas where they are. And if they are in my area I want to know where in vicinity to me they are, so if they approach me I can know to get away from them. Eyes are a good thing!
Truth About Sex Crimes wrote:
Unfortunately this information protects no one. Upwards of 93-94 percent of new sex crimes are committed by first offenders not on the registry and of those persons a similar percentage are committed by persons close to the victim; includes family members, teachers, coaches, clergy, day care providers, medical providers, etc. A little research and you will find these numbers being generated by state agencies and law enforcement. The general public is being lulled into thinking the danger is from some registered sex offender when in fact the danger is from Dad, Uncle, Doctor, Coach, Reverend ... and the next door neighbor. Upwards of 40% of registerable sex offenses are committed by Juveniles ... most who are first time offenders in the system and who do not appear on the public registries.
The public is allowing itself to be duped emotionally, intellectually, and financially. Wake up to the real threat and don't be taken in by the political fear hype and rhetoric about the registry. Think about this, if 7% of registered sex offenders commit another sex crime ( a high number ) and more than 50% of sex crimes go unreported that would have to be applied to the much larger portion of first time offenders, halving the recidivism statistic to 3.5%. Use some critical thinking and the brains you were given and question what you are being fed by the media and other stakeholders. Sex offenders have become the new N word and big business in the USA.
How does the registry protect ANY child from someone not on the registry? How much money is spent on preventing the next 94 out of 100 sex crimes against a minor from perpetrators not on the registry. Registries are a costly fraud on 94 out of 100 minors who end up victims.
not hardly

San Bernardino, CA

#26 Dec 5, 2009
I have seen the pay scale for the officers-it is available to the public. Tom Fitzmaurice does not even make 200,000$ in yearly pay let alone what you are claiming. Go throw your propoganda out the window.
RPD wrote:
Tom Fitzmaurice of Redlands Police Department gets paid $360,000. How much do you make?
Truth About Sex Crimes

Albuquerque, NM

#27 Dec 6, 2009
wrong wrote:
As a victim of a sexual preditor, I will say you are wrong. I want a registry. I am an educated woman who has spoken with many people who have been victims of sexual crimes committed by sexual preditors. Many sexual preditors are older men, not juveniles. sexual preditors can not be cured. Sexual preditors keep committing sexual offenses going from one victim to another. Most sexual preditors are not caught though. But for those who are on a registry, I want to have the ability to know where they live so I don't live in the areas where they are. And if they are in my area I want to know where in vicinity to me they are, so if they approach me I can know to get away from them. Eyes are a good thing!<quoted text>
I'm sorry you where a victim. But you are not correct in your statements about facts. I will use one example of a study done by a state agency, keeping in mind this did not sway legislators in this state. The agency used the states own statistics of offenders. I would encourage you to read this report as it is typical of the findings in other states, the federal government, and professionals in law enforcement as well as sex offender management.

If you dispute these findings, please post or link verifiable facts. What is at stake are the new victims of these offenses. Ignoring the facts and the truth do a serious disservice to the public in general and potential victims in particular. It is an uncomfortable subject full of emotion. People don't want to admit what is going on and tend to fall into distorted thinking when they are not objective. Many official state sex offender registry sites have FAQ sections about sex offenders and sex crimes that reiterate these same concerns, most sex offenses are committed by family members, friends, and adults in trusted positions and known to the victim. The vast majority ( 92-94% depending on what state statistics you are looking at )of new offenses are charged against persons NOT in the system. State agencies generally are not motivated in their analyses to provide false information, their are concerned about how resources are expended. Legislators and elected officials unfortunately ignore facts in favor of votes.

State Of Ohio January 2006 Sex Offender Report
www.ocjs.state.oh.us/Research/Sex%20Offender%...

With a little research you will find many similar findings from other states such as New York. I hope you will, as a intelligent and educated person at least look at the facts with an open mind. I understand the trauma and effect this has had on you, but please don't let it cloud your judgement when it comes to other potential victims. More resources need to be expended where they will do the most good. Given the track record of registries,residential restrictions, public shunning, etc.; we need to focus solutions where these crimes are actually being committed and toward prevention where it counts the most: before the crime and with in our relationships. It does not mean not being watchful where appropriate concerning the small number of recidivists. By your own statement you are claiming most are not caught. Most studies indicate in those cases it is because these incidences go unreported because they involve family members,friends, close associates. Right or wrong many families do not want to subject the victim, offending family member, or social group to trial, ridicule and social stigma. There is no system in place for potential offenders to seek treatment. The public continues to not want to recognize the societal problem as a public health problem as a starting place.
Wrong

San Bernardino, CA

#28 Dec 6, 2009
Actually, I have studied it in college too. I will read your link as soon as I can, but I am tied up for the rest of the week. I saved it on my computer. I would like to know what preventive measures you believe would be an effective solution. Thanks for the link.
Truth About Sex Crimes wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm sorry you where a victim. But you are not correct in your statements about facts. I will use one example of a study done by a state agency, keeping in mind this did not sway legislators in this state. The agency used the states own statistics of offenders. I would encourage you to read this report as it is typical of the findings in other states, the federal government, and professionals in law enforcement as well as sex offender management.
If you dispute these findings, please post or link verifiable facts. What is at stake are the new victims of these offenses. Ignoring the facts and the truth do a serious disservice to the public in general and potential victims in particular. It is an uncomfortable subject full of emotion. People don't want to admit what is going on and tend to fall into distorted thinking when they are not objective. Many official state sex offender registry sites have FAQ sections about sex offenders and sex crimes that reiterate these same concerns, most sex offenses are committed by family members, friends, and adults in trusted positions and known to the victim. The vast majority ( 92-94% depending on what state statistics you are looking at )of new offenses are charged against persons NOT in the system. State agencies generally are not motivated in their analyses to provide false information, their are concerned about how resources are expended. Legislators and elected officials unfortunately ignore facts in favor of votes.
State Of Ohio January 2006 Sex Offender Report
www.ocjs.state.oh.us/Research/Sex%20Offender%...
With a little research you will find many similar findings from other states such as New York. I hope you will, as a intelligent and educated person at least look at the facts with an open mind. I understand the trauma and effect this has had on you, but please don't let it cloud your judgement when it comes to other potential victims. More resources need to be expended where they will do the most good. Given the track record of registries,residential restrictions, public shunning, etc.; we need to focus solutions where these crimes are actually being committed and toward prevention where it counts the most: before the crime and with in our relationships. It does not mean not being watchful where appropriate concerning the small number of recidivists. By your own statement you are claiming most are not caught. Most studies indicate in those cases it is because these incidences go unreported because they involve family members,friends, close associates. Right or wrong many families do not want to subject the victim, offending family member, or social group to trial, ridicule and social stigma. There is no system in place for potential offenders to seek treatment. The public continues to not want to recognize the societal problem as a public health problem as a starting place.
Wendy

Portland, OR

#29 Dec 7, 2009
Not sure where Marina Del Rey comes from. It has put that since the first time I posted. I am from Upland but there is no field to put it in. Can I butt back in now?

I am not a saint at all and my past actions follow me as well...it is a fact of life and too many people do not consider that before they make bad choices.
Truth About Sex Crimes

Albuquerque, NM

#30 Dec 7, 2009
Education is one effective tool. There needs to be a more extensive mental health support system where potential offenders can self identify and seek help before they commit a crime. Key to this is that they will not be stigmatized for seeking help. Already in place are safe guards concerning reporting if a therapist believes someone is at risk or is being abused. There needs to be better education and open discussion in schools about the consequences of offending, legal education if you will, as well as encouragement to talk with someone if a young person perceives themselves as a potential offender. Some juvenile offenders are as young as 9 in the system currently. All of this starts with a better awareness of who is actually offending as a first step.

Here is the latest report from the USA Federal Department Of Justice on Juvenile Sex Crimes. I hope readers will take the time to read it. Numbers vary from state to state and this report is based on The National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS). In certain states some sex crimes do not fall into the categories in the NIBRS but with an adult ajudication in some states for a parrallel offense would place a person in a Tier I offender category for purposes of the sex offender registry. The likely hood is the percentage of sex offenses in this broader range is somewhat higher, 40% is probably a conservative number without factoring unreported crimes.

WASHINGTON, Dec. 1 ( 2009)/PRNewswire-USNewswire/-- The Department of Justice's Office of Justice Programs (OJP) today announced the release of a bulletin reporting on youth who commit sexual offenses against minors. The latest in the Crimes Against Children Series from OJP's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the bulletin draws on data from the FBI's National Incident-Based Reporting System to describe the characteristics of the juvenile sex offender population coming to the attention of law enforcement. Key findings include: juveniles account for more than one-third (36%) of those known to police to have committed sex offenses against minors; and juveniles who commit sex offenses against other children are more likely than adult sex offenders to offend in groups, at schools, and to have more male and younger victims.

TITLE: "Juveniles Who Commit Sex Offenses Against Minors"

A copy of the report is available at: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/ojjdp/227763.pd...

Here is a recent story from Boston about the registry and juvenile offenders. http://www.myfoxboston.com/dpp/news/undercove...

Human nature being what it is, probably more sex crimes against minors by unknown persons are reported to police than those crimes committed by family members and other assailents well known to the minor victims. Under reporting of sex crimes has long been an extrapolated conclusion of law enforcement and researchers, especially if they are a family member such as a sibling or bread winner.
Wrong wrote:
Actually, I have studied it in college too. I will read your link as soon as I can, but I am tied up for the rest of the week. I saved it on my computer. I would like to know what preventive measures you believe would be an effective solution. Thanks for the link. <quoted text>
Keith Richard Radford Jr

Glendale, CA

#31 Dec 7, 2009
Any act is debatable; astoundingly this has been allowed to go on this long. The disgust come from prejudice not even being able to discuss the issue by ones own internal wiring like a maze of mixed nerve ending unable to function, the mind shuts down unable to have empathy for the situation like any rational issue. We don’t even have laws that make since or definitions that work within those laws. We still want people to say they are mentally ill for having sex. Sex is nor will ever be the end of life in fact its necessary for our continued existence. The paradigm is better heard through the conflict of religions where people acutely kill one another over sex, but the message is the same. We have painted opinion with blood for far too long when the money is spent on punishment to the delight of the enforcers while the enforcers are exempt from their own laws which have no definition anymore. We still want people to say they are mentally ill for having sex, or not, when the inclination is to bow to authority sex often times becomes rape. I once had a woman ask if I was propositioning her by throwing pennies at her when I just wanted her to go away. Till we see its something like headaches/backaches too someone who has never had one, and once we have we start thinking allot about what really matters in life and how so many can spend OUR lives fighting amongst THEMSELVES over things that really don’t amount to a hill of frijoles. It is just a permanent under class designed by those who have been in the business of un~just/unconstitutional laws/inequity for the wrong reasons too long. 20-873 Associate Psychologist (Sex Offender Assessment and Treatment)-$58,406-$71,732 20-871 Licensed Psychologist (Sex Offender Assessment and Treatment)-$64,912-$79,342 Psychologist Counseling Salary $91,196 = US National Average Salary per worker who wants access to every home in America? Soon enough the greed will lead to more corruption while homes still get place on tv for sell and who is to judge on information to get the next house?

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 2
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Redlands Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News UCLA FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK: Neuheisel says Prince w... (Sep '10) 11 min MidPhartz 32,924
Review: Highland Meadows Apartments (Apr '11) Fri MELODY 1,027
Verdemont Heights Towne Center in San Bernardino (Nov '11) Apr 27 Wanda 15
News State to close Chino youth authority facility (Aug '09) Apr 26 Holscad 35
Wendy Ewell is located at 6782 Ventura Ct. San ... Apr 25 WENDY EWELL 1
Metrolink Inland Empire-Orange County Line Apr 25 METROLINK IEOC LINE 3
Tired of Foreigners Apr 22 URmisinformed 1

Redlands Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Redlands Mortgages