Richard Mazzucchi - Positive Point: I...

Richard Mazzucchi - Positive Point: Is shelter and encouragement too much to ask?

There are 16 comments on the Red Bluff Daily News story from Jan 31, 2011, titled Richard Mazzucchi - Positive Point: Is shelter and encouragement too much to ask?. In it, Red Bluff Daily News reports that:

Richard Mazzucchi is a retired research engineer specializing in energy efficiency and renewable energy.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Red Bluff Daily News.

Red Bluff Libertarian

Wichita, KS

#1 Jan 31, 2011
What a great column, Rich. One important factor in siting a homeless facility, is it has to be near where the homeless people are. It's not like they will have transportation out of town.

I know you've taken ribbing about "why not place it on your property?", but that just wouldn't be feasible. For this are, it has to be near town, as that is where the other services are available.

thanks.

“Stupidity should be outlawed”

Since: Nov 09

Redding, CA

#2 Jan 31, 2011
Richard, I agree that homeless people need our help. However, I don't agree that the property owner's concerns should be painted with such an apathetic brush and dismissed off handedly in such a manner as you did. The people who own properties in proximity to the proposed shelter do have a legitimate concern about the value that may be lost because of this. It always seems so easy for you to color your own ideals with rainbows and gold stars, while stomping other's concerns in the mud. Bigots, haters, naysayers. Any one who does not agree seems to fall into one or all of these categories to you. People who work hard and sacrifice to own property should be heard and respected.It is always easy for you to deride and diminish anyone who has more than the homeless. You cannot honestly say that these types would not bring crime and filth to the area. There are alot of good people that really do need help and would be grateful. For them, I wish the best. Most though, are homeless because of repetitive bad choices and learn nothing no matter what they are given. It is this mentality that the property owners are afraid of. I can't say as I blame them. If there is a million dollar grant available,then why not build the shelter away from established homes?Get a property that they can grow food on and maybe some livestock. That would keep them busy and also be productive.
Red Bluff Libertarian

Wichita, KS

#3 Jan 31, 2011
Rsnake, you have good point. However, this part "If there is a million dollar grant available,then why not build the shelter away from established homes? Get a property that they can grow food on and maybe some livestock." leads to me to consider that this would make the shelter a long-term solution for its residents, and I gathered that the idea was for it to be short or intermediate term.

To me, the more money PATH has to spend to keep finding, vetting, surveying... locations, the less money they will have to be able to build a shelter that will have the least impact possible on it's neighbors. Again, IMHO, a shelter on the edge of a residential neighborhood, with adequate landscaping (restrict views and noise), outdoor gathering area, and that is accessible for the homeless, while still allowing them to be near employment opportunities, medical care, social services... would be preferable to something that is in an industrial or agricultural area.

It would be great if the shelter had space (and money!!!) available to offer counseling services, treatment for addiction, day care (which would help with finding/keeping employment).

as always, if wishes were horses :-)
Robert Red Bluff

Orland, CA

#4 Jan 31, 2011
Here is the sad reality. If natural gas were discovered on the same property and the homeowners objected to a fracking well the well would be drilled anyway. Even if the pollution from the well was harming kids health the well would be drilled anyway. A bus load of lawyers would see to it. committee meeting after committee meeting and protest signs and newspaper articles would all be powerless against the well. Yet, let a community try and build a homeless shelter in the neighborhood and a dozen homeowners can stop it dead cold in its tracks because of litter worry. It just doesn't seem right. Let the people build the dang shelter for the love of God!
Ron Paul

United States

#5 Jan 31, 2011
Whats wrong with churches , Philanthropists , and
the community coming together to help the homeless ?
The problem with government grants is We do not get to choose .We all become a little richer when we tithe , donate directly , or donate time .If I choose not to pay taxes men with guns will come and take my freedom away .Mr Mazzucchi I admire what you are doing, but you will find it easier to help the less fortunate without government support .Remember when you take the governments hand out it comes with strings attached .
Evelyn

Menlo Park, CA

#6 Jan 31, 2011
There are so many views to take into consideration and it is only appropriate to really listen to what people have to say before making one's own opionion on the matter. We are a caring community and for that we should be proud. The fact that we feel to need to help the homeless says alot about Red Bluff as it is a real need. The only thing we actually disagree on is the location. The fact the time is running out on the grant money should not influence a yes on the current location. There are 40 people per night that will benefit from the shelter but there are hundreds of neighbors in all directions that will permanently be negatively effected by the placement of the shelter, not 18 as previously mentioned. Put yourself in the shoes of the homeless but do the same for those who made good life choices, who have worked hard all their lives and purchased homes in a beautiful section of town.
craig

Loyalton, CA

#7 Jan 31, 2011
Evelyn wrote:
There are so many views to take into consideration and it is only appropriate to really listen to what people have to say before making one's own opionion on the matter. We are a caring community and for that we should be proud. The fact that we feel to need to help the homeless says alot about Red Bluff as it is a real need. The only thing we actually disagree on is the location. The fact the time is running out on the grant money should not influence a yes on the current location. There are 40 people per night that will benefit from the shelter but there are hundreds of neighbors in all directions that will permanently be negatively effected by the placement of the shelter, not 18 as previously mentioned. Put yourself in the shoes of the homeless but do the same for those who made good life choices, who have worked hard all their lives and purchased homes in a beautiful section of town.
So well put. We need to think of everyone concerned, as we make up our mind on this matter.

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#8 Feb 1, 2011
Rsnake460 wrote:
Richard, I agree that homeless people need our help. However, I don't agree that the property owner's concerns should be painted with such an apathetic brush and dismissed off handedly in such a manner as you did. The people who own properties in proximity to the proposed shelter do have a legitimate concern about the value that may be lost because of this. It always seems so easy for you to color your own ideals with rainbows and gold stars, while stomping other's concerns in the mud. Bigots, haters, naysayers. Any one who does not agree seems to fall into one or all of these categories to you. People who work hard and sacrifice to own property should be heard and respected.It is always easy for you to deride and diminish anyone who has more than the homeless. You cannot honestly say that these types would not bring crime and filth to the area. There are alot of good people that really do need help and would be grateful. For them, I wish the best. Most though, are homeless because of repetitive bad choices and learn nothing no matter what they are given. It is this mentality that the property owners are afraid of. I can't say as I blame them. If there is a million dollar grant available,then why not build the shelter away from established homes?Get a property that they can grow food on and maybe some livestock. That would keep them busy and also be productive.
great post
Egor

Redding, CA

#9 Feb 1, 2011
Is getting a high school diploma and making the choice to stay away from drugs and alcohol too much to ask? It all comes down to choices. If one does the crime, one must do the time. Having a criminal record rarely gets someone a decent job in this world. Choices.
grablife

Redding, CA

#10 Feb 3, 2011
Here's an idea. Since everybody in American is going to be forced to buy health insurance, why not force everybody to also own a house?

Homeless problems solved.
JohnBoy

Redding, CA

#11 Feb 3, 2011
Robert Red Bluff wrote:
Here is the sad reality. If natural gas were discovered on the same property and the homeowners objected to a fracking well the well would be drilled anyway. Even if the pollution from the well was harming kids health the well would be drilled anyway. A bus load of lawyers would see to it. committee meeting after committee meeting and protest signs and newspaper articles would all be powerless against the well. Yet, let a community try and build a homeless shelter in the neighborhood and a dozen homeowners can stop it dead cold in its tracks because of litter worry. It just doesn't seem right. Let the people build the dang shelter for the love of God!
Let the people build their shelter on Robert's property. He talks the talk, let's see him walk the walk. If natural gas were discovered anywhere around here it would be crazy NOT to drill for it. What a kook. Go back to LA where you came from.
Robert Red Bluff

United States

#12 Feb 3, 2011
grablife wrote:
Here's an idea. Since everybody in American is going to be forced to buy health insurance, why not force everybody to also own a house?
Homeless problems solved.
The truth is the house payment would be less than the health insurance payment.
Robert Red Bluff

United States

#13 Feb 3, 2011
JohnBoy wrote:
<quoted text>
Let the people build their shelter on Robert's property. He talks the talk, let's see him walk the walk. If natural gas were discovered anywhere around here it would be crazy NOT to drill for it. What a kook. Go back to LA where you came from.
I would go back to LA if some jerk hadn't contaminated the land I use to live near by drilling for Oil. It's sad that many in the old neighborhoods have died of cancer and their children's IQ test dropped by a 40 points. Those poor kids were all shipped to Redding and now think they are doing a good thing by voting for Wally Herger every election.
There is a time when money isn't the most important thing. Maybe you're one of those pro-clearcut guys who heats his home with a burn-barrel. So I don't expect you to understand.
JB in RB

Chico, CA

#14 Feb 8, 2011
When I was young, my family had a cat that was always sitting on the porch when it was time for its dinner. It would eat and then go lay down. Whenever we discovered a gopher on the front lawn, we would stop feeding the cat. Amazingly, the cat would have the gopher sitting on the porch the next day. The moral of the story is if you want to eat, go out and earn your food. We don't need a "permanent" shelter because if people we actually trying to find work, they would only need a moderate helping hand which the local churches could easily provide if they weren't being depleted by the need to provide housing and food every day to those unwilling to work.
Robert Red Bluff

Chico, CA

#15 Feb 8, 2011
JB in RB wrote:
When I was young, my family had a cat that was always sitting on the porch when it was time for its dinner. It would eat and then go lay down. Whenever we discovered a gopher on the front lawn, we would stop feeding the cat. Amazingly, the cat would have the gopher sitting on the porch the next day. The moral of the story is if you want to eat, go out and earn your food. We don't need a "permanent" shelter because if people we actually trying to find work, they would only need a moderate helping hand which the local churches could easily provide if they weren't being depleted by the need to provide housing and food every day to those unwilling to work.
Only a church going conservative could say something like this when unemployment is over 20% in our area. When did Jesus call homeless people lazy and unwilling to work?

“Sustainable and Spiritual Soul”

Since: Nov 09

Los Molinos, CA

#16 Feb 15, 2011
I'm glad to report that after hearing from a packed house tonight that the Red Bluff City Council voted 3-2 to enact the zoning change requested by PATH to build a homeless shelter at the Brekinridge site.

Eleven people spoke in favor and 8 against. The meeting was respectful and a great demonstration of democracy in action. It is now incumbent upon PATH and their supporters to ensure that adverse consequencies raised by neighbors do not come to fruition.

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