Eyes on the ball

Full story: Baltimore Sun

The lucky ones heard their numbers called early. Not only could those first-announced winners beam with pride about being one of the first 80 students who will attend the SEED School of Maryland, but they also ...
Comments
1 - 13 of 13 Comments Last updated May 19, 2008
OverTheTop

Butler, MD

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#1
May 18, 2008
 
Am I missing something? The article states this school " is designed to serve students who live in "under-resourced" communities" , then it highlights students from Randallstown, Lansdowe and Columbia. I thought Howard and Baltimore counties were in the upper eschelon of public school sysytems in this state. Seems like once again the truely needy just passed over.
funkateer

Baltimore, MD

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2
May 18, 2008
 
I thought the same thing. And the family from West Baltimore didn't get called -- that child probably has to go to one of those schools where teachers are attacked on a daily basis.
A City School Teacher

Baltimore, MD

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#3
May 18, 2008
 
It costs about $60,000 per student, to send a child to the SEED School this year. Next year it will cost $30,000. True, the state is paying the bulk of it, so students from all over MD can attend. As a teacher, I see students who are bright, but have difficult home lives. The students who would truely benefit the most, must have a teacher or social worker initiate an application. Their parents don't have a clue, or may care less. Chances are, if a parent was sitting with their child at the lottery, then they must give a darn about their child's education. It seems if SEED's heart was in the right place, it would only accept the best and brightest of the poor, or the most disadvantaged. To me, the whole social entrepreneurship phenomenon is a bit shady. Just how much do the schools'founders and principals make a year? This is what the Sun should include in a good piece of journalism, not just material that jerks tears and pulls heartstrings.
Baltimore City Resident

Baltimore, MD

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#4
May 18, 2008
 
How needy can the children be if their parents are with them? Half the problem in public schools is that the teachers cannot control what the children do between 3pm and 8am the following morning. That time period is left to the parents, many of whom are absent in poor households. But THESE parents showed-up WITH their kids, which suggests they care about their children, thus aren't the most needy.

I also wonder about phrases like "impressive college admissions record." It's not the admission to college that counts -- there are plenty of mediocre colleges out there that will admit students who belong in trade schools instead, and those students drop out or fail out of college. The phrase should be "100% college graduation rates" or perhaps "the highest reading, writing, and arithmetic skills of all boarding school students in the country."
Christopher

District Heights, MD

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5
May 18, 2008
 
funkateer wrote:
I thought the same thing. And the family from West Baltimore didn't get called -- that child probably has to go to one of those schools where teachers are attacked on a daily basis.
Teachers are NOT attacked on a daily basis at schools in West Baltimore. Stop the hysterics, and get the facts: maybe once every two weeks is a teacher 'attacked', usually while trying to break up an argument between students that they should really just butt out of and just make worse by trying to 'intervene'.
Former DC SEED Teacher

Baltimore, MD

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#6
May 18, 2008
 
I'm sorry to see the SEED school coming to Maryland. I taught at this school and it has the same staff turnover problems probably as some the "violent" West Baltimore schools mentioned.
The previous comments are right on point, a lot of my kids in DC (not all, but quite a bit) had families that cared about them. The school's motto is insulting to these kids - basically telling them and their families that their only chance is to get away from that "toxic" environment.
I think the best way for city kids to succeed is to somehow involve their parents a whole lot more, not a whole lot less.
Also, I have never seen such wasting of money and "mission drift" as I saw at the school in DC. I got there in its 9th year - the science labs were practically non-existent. This when the science department had been getting seven to twelve thousand dollars a year. Where was this money going?!?
Another previous comment mentioned the 97% college acceptance rate. That person is correct in wondering about how well these kids actually do. I don't have the exact figures but I think almost half do not graduate in four years, and I know that of the graduating class of twelve last year, six were not currently enrolled in college as of the fall. Now, I don't have the details because I did not teach these kids. But just the fact that only 12 kids out of a starting class of 50 or 60 graduated is telling in and of itself.
Hopefully some very detailed reporting from the Sun will force the SEED school in Maryland not to make the same mistakes that were made in DC.
Schlomo

Parkton, MD

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#7
May 18, 2008
 
Christopher wrote:
<quoted text>
Teachers are NOT attacked on a daily basis at schools in West Baltimore. Stop the hysterics, and get the facts: maybe once every two weeks is a teacher 'attacked', usually while trying to break up an argument between students that they should really just butt out of and just make worse by trying to 'intervene'.
Your eyes must be very wide apart.
Stu

Washington, DC

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#8
May 18, 2008
 
So Baltimore City handed over a multi-million dollar prop for chump change and most of the kids that will attend are from outside the city? What a shame, this should be for students in need...
louis

Hudson, MA

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#9
May 19, 2008
 
There has to be more opportunities for young men like Maurice and for young women. We as a society must give them a chance to succeed. If SEED will get it done then we must support that Foundation and make as many copies available as there are young people that want to grow.

Thanks for taking the time to write about the hopes an dreams of our young men and women.
louis

Hudson, MA

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#10
May 19, 2008
 
Maybe you should ask the SUN to report on the cost of imprisioning young men and women in the city jails. Maybe you would be more comfortable with seeing the number of dead young men and women esculate. Hey, Maybe there is a chance that the cost of courts are so much less than the cost of education that you are willing to commit your taxes to that type of endeavor for the next seven. I am not sure what you would see as progress but any possibality for our young men and women to have a better opportuntiy in life should be embraced and suppported by every one of us even YOU.

years
A City School Teacher wrote:
It costs about $60,000 per student, to send a child to the SEED School this year. Next year it will cost $30,000. True, the state is paying the bulk of it, so students from all over MD can attend. As a teacher, I see students who are bright, but have difficult home lives. The students who would truely benefit the most, must have a teacher or social worker initiate an application. Their parents don't have a clue, or may care less. Chances are, if a parent was sitting with their child at the lottery, then they must give a darn about their child's education. It seems if SEED's heart was in the right place, it would only accept the best and brightest of the poor, or the most disadvantaged. To me, the whole social entrepreneurship phenomenon is a bit shady. Just how much do the schools'founders and principals make a year? This is what the Sun should include in a good piece of journalism, not just material that jerks tears and pulls heartstrings.
Obama for President

District Heights, MD

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#11
May 19, 2008
 
Why is it that something positive a group of people are trying to do must be criticized? Let's open our minds, eyes, and hearts to help out ANY child who wants to put education first.
Former DC SEED Teacher

Baltimore, MD

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#12
May 19, 2008
 
I think it's important to pay attention though, rather than call it positive without actually knowing what's going on for the students. Who knows, maybe this school will do great things, and one way to make sure this happens is for the public to be asking questions. This goes for any school.
Obama for President wrote:
Why is it that something positive a group of people are trying to do must be criticized? Let's open our minds, eyes, and hearts to help out ANY child who wants to put education first.
A City School Teacher

Baltimore, MD

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#13
May 19, 2008
 
louis wrote:
Maybe you should ask the SUN to report on the cost of imprisioning young men and women in the city jails. Maybe you would be more comfortable with seeing the number of dead young men and women esculate. Hey, Maybe there is a chance that the cost of courts are so much less than the cost of education that you are willing to commit your taxes to that type of endeavor for the next seven. I am not sure what you would see as progress but any possibality for our young men and women to have a better opportuntiy in life should be embraced and suppported by every one of us even YOU.
years<quoted text>
The whole MD SEED school project cost some 30 million dollars. I can think of many more worthwhile ways our money can be spent to help these children. At one time, I contemplated teaching at the SEED School, so I did my research. I was not comfortable with my findings. There was an audit of the DC Seed School which indicated a mismanaged budget, and around 20 suspensions and expulsions apiece (in the DC school). Charter schools can be a godsend, or a vehicle for opportunists to exploit the suffering of others in the name of Social Entrepreneurship. Why is the SEED School's website a .com and not a .org? I do support giving children a better opportunity in life. That is why I live here, teach here and pay taxes here. Last time I checked, Newton MA is one of the safest, most affluent suburbs around. I even know a few people from Newton. Baltimore City is always hiring new teachers. Why don't YOU come embrace and support some young people here? We would love to have you!

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Other Recent Randallstown Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
IDT Energy Is this legit or scam? (Jun '13) Aug 18 cool 95
Baltimore Stands with Israel Aug 15 I can read 76
Milford Mill students get a boost before they g... Jul '14 Vanessa 1
2 in Custody After Teen Stabbed Near Randallsto... May '14 carlos 1
MD Who do you support for Governor in Maryland in ... (Oct '10) Apr '14 fyi 185
Student Sent To Hospital From Pepper Spray Used... Apr '14 jose 1
Review: Right About IT Publications (Nov '13) Nov '13 Nanette Hopkins 1

Search the Randallstown Forum:
•••
•••
•••

Randallstown Jobs

•••
Enter and win $5000
•••

Randallstown People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

•••

Randallstown News, Events & Info

Click for news, events and info in Randallstown
•••

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]
•••