QMFA - Quakertown Midget Football
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jen

Sellersville, PA

#43 Oct 18, 2012
been there wrote:
would love to be a fly on the wall when that family gathers around the table to play candy land or chutes & ladders. It's sad to think for some that football created who they are and not a loving family.
If your sitting around playing chutes and ladders with kids who are in middle school, your nuts! Stop treating them like babies and help them to grow up. Your also babying them by pouting about them only getting 10 plays.....#1 parents grow up #2 love your kids by teaching them life lessons #Stop lying to your kids
My Opinion

Perkasie, PA

#44 Oct 18, 2012
Bill wrote:
QMFA had $ 60,000 missing from there accounts last year. Nobody on that board is able to explain it, to the new board members. Several were told to turn a blind eye, because the Team who went to Disney neede it to ofset the costs related to travel. An investigator was going to look at this case, but the prior board refused. Any thoughts?
If this is true I think I would have the DA's office look into it. Could be a form of embezzelment.
QMFA parent

Newtown Square, PA

#45 Oct 18, 2012
just an expression of frustration, thats all shawn of perkasie. no names, no team mentioned. one questionable coach doesnt discredit the whole league. we have a few seasons left, didnt say we were jumping ship on the league, just saying the coach can make or break the experience and that goes for all youth sports. the previous comment could be dropped in any forum around the country about any MFA and some would agree and some would disagree.
Jim

Sellersville, PA

#46 Oct 19, 2012
QMFA Parent wrote:
It all depends on the character of the coach. Some are there for the kids, some are there to boost their own self esteem. My son has experienced both. This year we have the latter. Pop Warner has a minimum playing time rule of 10 plays per game which equals about 3 minutes total time on the field. This rule is to protect kids from clowns who wouldn't play the lesser skilled kids at all regardless of effort. A good coach will find ways to include these kids more. Our coach has his own kid on the 10 play squad because he believes he's teaching him a life lesson in perserverance. How about this lesson, "my dad loves winning games more than he loves me."
I believe that I know what coach you are referring to. I wont use names, but the coach that I believe you are referring to is one of the most honest and fair coaches that QMFA has ever had. Most people complain because all the coaches kids get all the play time....your complaining because the coaches kid gets as many plays as your kid??? Strange! These coaches give alot of themselves...and yes there are some who can make or break a season...but clearly this coach is not one of them. I wonder if he knows that you are speaking about him like this on this forum, perhaps I'll pass it on. And to say "my dad loves winning games more than he loves me"........wow, your the type of person that gives "parents of organized sports" a bad name. If this is the coach I am thinking of, you better believe he loves his kid.....enough to tell him the truth, unlike you.
QMFA parent

Newtown Square, PA

#47 Oct 19, 2012
my husband told me this would bring the football dads out in droves. I am sure this man loves his child, jim of perkasie. just seems a little over the top to me.
Bill

Newtown Square, PA

#48 Oct 20, 2012
QMFA parent wrote:
my husband told me this would bring the football dads out in droves. I am sure this man loves his child, jim of perkasie. just seems a little over the top to me.
Well, there you have it folks, a FOOTBALL MOMMY is upset her BABY didn't get playing time, imagine that. Better start saving up for those ballet shoes now.
Marie

Broomall, PA

#49 Oct 20, 2012
QMFA Parent wrote:
It all depends on the character of the coach. Some are there for the kids, some are there to boost their own self esteem. My son has experienced both. This year we have the latter. Pop Warner has a minimum playing time rule of 10 plays per game which equals about 3 minutes total time on the field. This rule is to protect kids from clowns who wouldn't play the lesser skilled kids at all regardless of effort. A good coach will find ways to include these kids more. Our coach has his own kid on the 10 play squad because he believes he's teaching him a life lesson in perserverance. How about this lesson, "my dad loves winning games more than he loves me."
Oh please, cut me a break....grow up! Who is the child here, you or your boy???? You should have known when joining a competative league that only the best players getting playing time. It wouldn't be fair, to the other kids on the team to put kids in there that cant carry their weight, so to speak. No one needs to here your complaints about good coaches, if you can do a better job, do it yourself. In the future try to be more positive and thank those who are volunteering their time to serve your kid!!!!!!!
FormerReadingTea cher

Newtown Square, PA

#50 Feb 1, 2015
UnwelcomeReality wrote:
Michigan Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness, Health and Sports Position Statement:The Prevention of injuries in Amateur Football--
Age and Maturation: Children under six years old should not play competitive football. Tackle football should not be played by children under 10 years of age. Youth teams should be matched by skill level and size.
It is often advised that very young children should not play football. The National Youth Sports Safety Foundation recommends that children under six not play the sport. Collision sports like ice hockey and tackle football should not be allowed until age 10.
Not one to "let it slide", I offer more (updated) information for parents who are considering allowing their under 12 year old children to participate in the sport of football.
By Alan Neuhauser Jan. 28, 2015 | 6:30 p.m.
Former NFL players who played tackle football before age 12 appear “significantly” more likely to suffer memory loss and mental health issues than those who begin playing later, according to a new study published in the run up to the Super Bowl.
Researchers from Boston University tested the memory, mental flexibility and verbal intelligence of 42 former pro football players. Half began tackle play when they were younger than 12 years ld, the other half when they were 12 or older.
Those who started earlier, the study found,“performed significantly worse on all test measures, even after researchers took into account the total number of years of football played and the age of the players at the time of the tests.” On some tests, the two groups differed by as much as 20 percent.
“We were struck by how robust the findings were,” says study co-author Robert Stern, professor of neurology, neurosurgery and anatomy and neurobiology at the Boston University School of Medicine.“I expected there to be something. But I was struck by how strong and consistent the findings were.”
The NFL, which helped pay for the players’ travel for the study, did not return a request for comment. The NFL Players Association, which also helped fund participants’ travel, declined to comment until it reviewed the study, which was released late Wednesday in the journal Neurology just days ahead of the league's premier event Sunday.
FormerReadingTea cher

Newtown Square, PA

#51 Feb 1, 2015
It remains unclear whether the players’ apparent impairments are a result of physical brain damage, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a degenerative brain disease found in former football players that has roiled the NFL and other professional sports leagues.
Brain researchers suspect CTE is a long-term consequence of repeated blows to the head. Everyone who has been diagnosed with the disease has suffered some amount of head trauma, but a causal link has yet to be established.
Boston University professor Robert Stern testifies June 25 before the Senate Special Committee on Aging during a hearing on brain injuries. Yet, says Stern,“If we’re seeing changes in cognition, it has to be coming from something. So the question is, what parts of the brain, what types of difficulties, what changes might actually be causing this? There’s many more steps to get to that point.”
Based on the results of the study – which he emphasized was limited in scope – and research he and others have performed,“before age 12 would be a good time to take tackling out.”
Nearly 5 million children play tackle football each year, making it the nation’s fourth most-popular youth sport behind basketball, soccer and baseball in 2012, according to prior studies and the Sports & Fitness Industry Association. About 70 percent of the nation’s young football players are younger than 14 years.At some of the sport’s youngest levels, ages 9 to 12, tackle football players can take an average 240 head blows a season, sometimes as many as 585, previous studies have found.
And while the hits might seem innocuous, with pint-sized players swaddled in seemingly oversize helmets and double-wide shoulder pads, the force they deliver on the field is hardly child’s play: Each hit can parallel the magnitude of those dished out at the high school and college level.
“The overall goal of the study was to see whether there’s some type of relationship between exposure to repetitive head impacts during a critical period of brain development in childhood and later-life cognitive functioning,” says Stern, who oversees clinical research for the Boston University’s Alzheimer’s Disease and CTE Center.
Bumper

Warminster, PA

#52 Feb 12, 2015
QMFA Alumni Dad wrote:
<quoted text>Well said. Been there don't miss it. My son took back seat to coaches kids but now in school ball he excels and the coaches kids well some don't even go out for the team.
Nice thread.... Bump
FormerReadingTea cher

Newtown Square, PA

#53 Feb 12, 2015
Bumper wrote:
<quoted text>
Nice thread.... Bump
Here Is the First Lawsuit Over Concussions in Pop Warner Football
—By Edwin Rios| Tue Feb. 10, 2015 6:25 AM EST

In the past year, both the NFL and the NCAA have settled multimillion-dollar lawsuits over concussions and football-related trauma, and complaints have even trickled down to the high school level. Next up in the legal crosshairs? Youth football.

On Thursday, Debra Pyka, the mother of Joseph Chernach, a 25-year-old Wisconsin man who committed suicide in 2012, filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Pop Warner, claiming that cognitive damage from his three years in organized youth football was responsible for his death. The lawsuit claims Chernach suffered from postconcussion syndrome and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative brain disease most often associated with former NFL players, as a result of "numerous" concussions he sustained starting when he was 11.

Chernach did not play football beyond high school; BuzzFeed reported in December that in a university examination of the brains of 19 people who played youth and high school football, Chernach was one of four people to test positive for CTE.

The fatal combination altered Chernach's "cognition, behavior, and mood" in the years leading up to his death, according to the lawsuit:

http://www.motherjones.com/mixed-media/2015/0...

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