More than 1,000 dead birds fall from sky in Ark

Jan 2, 2011 | Posted by: Inisa Love | Full story: news.yahoo.com

BEEBE, Ark. – Wildlife officials are trying to determine what caused more than 1,000 blackbirds to die and fall from the sky over an Arkansas town.

The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission said Saturday that it began receiving reports about the dead birds about 11:30 p.m. the previous night. The birds fell over a 1-mile area of Beebe, and an aerial survey indicated that no other dead birds were found outside of that area.

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“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

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#8941
Feb 14, 2013
 
Tooth4U wrote:
yah.... he is now a helicopter pilot in MEsa flying choppers of red color to 'save people' life flight. hahaha...
save people while once killing for money those wonderful song birds with poison everyone wishes to hear nesting in the spring and bringing their songs to your childrens ears.
If he quit the job of killing birds for money, that sounds like a good start. My brother used to have a bb gun. I don't want to know what he did with it as a child when I wasn't around. Now, as an adult, his heart melts when he sees a hummingbird. People change. Give your nephew the benefit of the doubt. Buy him lunch after a morning of birding in the spring. It will change his life. For every person we change, they too change another one.
WARRIOR

Alamogordo, NM

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#8942
Feb 14, 2013
 
I woke up this morning to discover that some idiots in this state want to protect the lesser praire chicken. This will cost jobs no doubt. What a bunch of idiots!

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

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#8943
Feb 14, 2013
 
Tooth4U wrote:
Oh man I jumped for the joy of eyesight and song..two days ago.. I saw a pair of Red Winged Blackbirds here on Cedar Key Florida.
there is hope.
I love red-winged Blackbirds. I anticipate beginning to see the first arrivals here in the north in another two weeks. I'm ready for them, though I've really been loving winter birds that migrated down here from the FAR NORTH this year! Common Redpolls and Pine Grosbeaks were the stars of the songbird show this winter for me. I'm hoping to find some Bohemian Waxwings before it's all said and done and they head north again.

I do look forward to May though. Peak migration for the colorful, singing neotropical migrants! Gotta love it!

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

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#8944
Feb 14, 2013
 
fifty1fifty wrote:
I'm afraid that really if you plant/grow the GMO corn again it might mutate and cause people that eat it to become more stupid from the bug killer grown into the GMO? I know more stupid is a hard concept in America at this point in time but if more people eat this mutant corn they will give up their guns to an "executive order asshole". Taco Bell uses GMO corn, I'm gonna miss them.):
What is this world coming to when one giant rules the world and makes all the decisions? You would think Obama owns Monsanto.
WARRIOR

Alamogordo, NM

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#8945
Feb 14, 2013
 
Raptor in Michigan wrote:
<quoted text>
What is this world coming to when one giant rules the world and makes all the decisions? You would think Obama owns Monsanto.
Obama thinks he owns US!
Churmudgeon

Horseshoe Bend, AR

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#8946
Feb 14, 2013
 
•Sample Page


Watch: Greeks Fight For Food:“I Never Imagined That I Would End Up Here”


Once a bastion of European success and center of tourism, the country of Greece has become the harbinger of things to come for the rest of the world’s developed nations.

Not long ago Greeks were enjoying high paid salaries, early retirements, excess cash, and seemingly never ending economic growth.

Today, just a short time after a financial collapse that rocked global financial markets, Europe’s darling has turned into a frightening example of what happens when governments and their people take on more debt than they can ever hope to repay.

The end result is a warning to the rest of us.


Hundreds of people jostled for free vegetables handed out by farmers in a symbolic protest earlier on Wednesday, trampling one man and prompting an outcry over the growing desperation created by economic crisis.

Images of people struggling to seize bags of tomatoes and leeks thrown from a truck dominated television, triggering a bout of soul-searching over the new depths of poverty in the debt-laden country.

“These images make me angry. Angry for a proud people who have no food to eat, who can’t afford to keep warm, who can’t make ends meet,” said Kostas Barkas, a lawmaker from the leftist Syriza party.

Other lawmakers from across the political spectrum decried the images “of people on the brink of despair” and the sense of “sadness for a proud people who have ended up like this“.

People have seen their living standards crumble as the country faces its sixth year of recession that has driven unemployment to record highs.



The free food handout in Athens began peacefully as hundreds of Greeks lined up in advance outside the agriculture ministry, where protesting farmers laid out tables piled high with produce, giving away 50 metric tonnes (55.11 tons) of produce in under two hours.

Tensions flared when the stalls ran out of produce and dozens of people – some carrying small children – rushed to a truck and shoved each other out of the way in the competition for what was left.

One man was treated for injuries after being trampled when he fell to the ground in the commotion.

“I never imagined that I would end up here,” said Panagiota Petropoulos, 65, who struggles to get by on her 530-euro monthly pension while paying 300 euros in rent.



Make no mistake. We are Greece.
Churmudgeon

Horseshoe Bend, AR

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#8947
Feb 14, 2013
 



Reuters via Zero Hedge

Desperation, sadness, poverty, disbelief – these are the horrors that await the unprepared.

While European (and U.S.) officials would have us believe they’ve mitigated the crisis in Greece, the fact is that this experiment in centralized governance is, in its entirety, on the brink of collapse.

We’ve chronicled the desperate situation in Greece for the last few years.

Personal accounts from some of our readers express their fear and uncertainty as political and socioeconomic conditions have deteriorated.

Shortages of life savings medicines and food have led to widespread riots and looting. Food has become so expensive in Greece that it has become unattainable for many, prompting the Greek government to authorize grocery retailers to sell expired food at discounted prices.

On a national level, Greece’s manipulation of economic health numbers and their ability to repay loans has left them unable to meet their financial obligations and has led to talks of their exit from the Euro, a move that has the potential to destroy the European currency system altogether.

The debts have gotten so high that the country faced the possibility of a complete collapse of their power and gas infrastructure when local utility companies were unable to settle their agreements with regional suppliers – an effect caused by their customers’ inability to pay their monthly bills.

This is what it looks like when a system collapses. Sometimes it happens overnight in a waterfall event. In the case of Greece, a country that has the backing of the world’s two largest central banks, it’s been a slow but steady process of grinding down all aspects of life.

A similar grinding down should be apparent in other Western nations, namely the United States, where we’ve seen employment decline unabated over the last decade and tens of millions of people added to government funded social safety nets like food assistance and disability.

Make no mistake. We are Greece.

Now is the time to prepare for the desperate situation that will soon be in America. For millions it’s already here.
•Have reserve foods – or at the very least, learn how to grow your own food. Raise your own livestock and poultry – it’ll be the difference between survival and strife should prices rise to extreme levels.
•Have reserve money – real money like gold and silver that can be used as a medium of exchange. At the height of panic, gold was selling for nearly double its value on the Greek black market than it was anywhere else in the world.
•Learn key skills and services that you can provide when traditional jobs dry up. In Greece, thousands of people have moved to black market barter for goods and services to make ends meet. What option, other than depending on your own skills and labor, is there when there is no work to be had?
•Consider self defense as a priority. When the looting and rioting for essential goods start, you’re going to need to be able to protect yourself and your reserve stockpiles.
•If you have the means to do so, relocate out of major cities and into areas that will afford you the ability to produce your own food, trade your skills, and stay out of the way of the madness that comes with large population densities.

Every day we edge closer to disaster. Life in America as we have come to know it is in the midst of a massive paradigm shift.

It will no doubt be difficult. But despite the challenges, with the proper mindset and preparation, perhaps we can avoid being one of the many who will be depending on handouts when the worst comes to pass.
Churmudgeon

Horseshoe Bend, AR

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#8948
Feb 14, 2013
 
Unless I miss my guess Ill bet those folks in greece have no hesitation about killing some bird or anything else that has meat on it bones and eating it!
roy

Hartley, IA

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#8949
Feb 14, 2013
 
I saw them fly by
ping

Los Angeles, CA

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#8950
Feb 14, 2013
 
pong
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Bixby, OK

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#8951
Feb 14, 2013
 
Raptor in Michigan wrote:
<quoted text>
I use a different approach on the ignorant ones. I don't see them as the enemy and avoid them. I see them as the prospect and I invite them.
I invite them to come with me into the great outdoors, or just look out my kitchen window, and do some bird watching. I may not tell them exactly what we're doing, but while out there, we will always see something cool.
I will offer my binoculars and describe what they are seeing. What the bird is doing. How far it flew to get there. Where they spend the winter, or summer depending on the season it is. How important they are as far as insect eaters, forest planters or pollinators. What a beautiful song they have. How the male and female can look so different from each other. Any other interesting facts about that bird, etc. And why there are so few now compared to 50 years ago. Or in some cases, why there are so many.
The results of my efforts usually pay off. I know very few people who don't like songbirds. Once I start showing them the different ones at the feeders, they start noticing details on all the birds they see. And they most always have a desire to protect them rather than kill them.
One man I work with quit mowing his 20 acre parcel each week and now has acreage full of butterflies, bobolinks and meadowlarks!
Don't give up on the nephew. Just introduce him to the wonderful world of birds that surround him. It may work, maybe not. It's worth a try. Do it for the birds.
When I was a girl, many, many years ago, I would see bees and butterflies all the time but not now. Why do you think that is?
Guest

Bixby, OK

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#8952
Feb 14, 2013
 
Churmudgeon wrote:
Reuters via Zero Hedge
Desperation, sadness, poverty, disbelief – these are the horrors that await the unprepared.
While European (and U.S.) officials would have us believe they’ve mitigated the crisis in Greece, the fact is that this experiment in centralized governance is, in its entirety, on the brink of collapse.
We’ve chronicled the desperate situation in Greece for the last few years.
Personal accounts from some of our readers express their fear and uncertainty as political and socioeconomic conditions have deteriorated.
Shortages of life savings medicines and food have led to widespread riots and looting. Food has become so expensive in Greece that it has become unattainable for many, prompting the Greek government to authorize grocery retailers to sell expired food at discounted prices.
On a national level, Greece’s manipulation of economic health numbers and their ability to repay loans has left them unable to meet their financial obligations and has led to talks of their exit from the Euro, a move that has the potential to destroy the European currency system altogether.
The debts have gotten so high that the country faced the possibility of a complete collapse of their power and gas infrastructure when local utility companies were unable to settle their agreements with regional suppliers – an effect caused by their customers’ inability to pay their monthly bills.
This is what it looks like when a system collapses. Sometimes it happens overnight in a waterfall event. In the case of Greece, a country that has the backing of the world’s two largest central banks, it’s been a slow but steady process of grinding down all aspects of life.
A similar grinding down should be apparent in other Western nations, namely the United States, where we’ve seen employment decline unabated over the last decade and tens of millions of people added to government funded social safety nets like food assistance and disability.
Make no mistake. We are Greece.
Now is the time to prepare for the desperate situation that will soon be in America. For millions it’s already here.
•Have reserve foods – or at the very least, learn how to grow your own food. Raise your own livestock and poultry – it’ll be the difference between survival and strife should prices rise to extreme levels.
•Have reserve money – real money like gold and silver that can be used as a medium of exchange. At the height of panic, gold was selling for nearly double its value on the Greek black market than it was anywhere else in the world.
•Learn key skills and services that you can provide when traditional jobs dry up. In Greece, thousands of people have moved to black market barter for goods and services to make ends meet. What option, other than depending on your own skills and labor, is there when there is no work to be had?
•Consider self defense as a priority. When the looting and rioting for essential goods start, you’re going to need to be able to protect yourself and your reserve stockpiles.
•If you have the means to do so, relocate out of major cities and into areas that will afford you the ability to produce your own food, trade your skills, and stay out of the way of the madness that comes with large population densities.
Every day we edge closer to disaster. Life in America as we have come to know it is in the midst of a massive paradigm shift.
It will no doubt be difficult. But despite the challenges, with the proper mindset and preparation, perhaps we can avoid being one of the many who will be depending on handouts when the worst comes to pass.
Excellent advice.

Glen Beck predicted this would happen and the unrest that will spread to the US. He urged people to store food and prepare and people laughed at him.

I have heeded his advice and urge others to do the same. We can't depend on government to save us. Look at the Sandy victims.

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

Since: Dec 10

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#8953
Feb 14, 2013
 
WARRIOR wrote:
<quoted text>Well this is just as good a place as any I have ever been to retire. I wish we had some big lakes closer. It is a small city where you don't have all the rush and big city problems. We are close enough to El Paso and Las Cruces to do some big city shopping when we desire and we have the desert and the mountains right at our feet. We are also young enough to get out and explore a little right now. I also like the Hill Country. Texas does not have an income tax either.
New Mexico is nice enough, but as you have noted, too many illegals. The crime rate is higher than I'd like it to be in many areas of the southwest. That is the only thing that would have me a little apprehensive about a move in that direction.

I'm not into shopping, so I don't need stores. A couple trips to Walmart each year for necessities and I'd be set. I mostly shop online if I need something.

I do love to explore and New Mexico's vast undisturbed landscapes is perfect for that. Every time we drive through there, I stare off into the desert and wonder what species may be out there that have yet to be discovered. I'd love to be the one to discover that new one!

Lakes? We have lakes all over the place here. Some are so large you would think they are oceans. I don't fish, but the birding at the shores and nearby woodlots is spectacular, especially during migration, as birds tend to follow shorelines where they congregate in a few well-known hotspots. These spots are so famous, people from all over the world come to witness the spectacle, especially in May. I don't know if I could give that up very easily.

I love the warbler migration! Just a few short weeks and most warblers have moved on to places farther north to breed. When they come back in August, they look totally different. It's so much fun seeing so many different colorful birds moving through the area. Many are singing during spring migration and can be identified by song alone. Some aren't so colorful, but it's fun and challenging to learn them all anyway. My photography has taken birding to a whole new level. It's a lifelong hobby, and business venture, that gets more fun all the time.

I own a small parcel of land in Texas, less than one mile from the NM border. It's in the middle of nowhere, but cheap enough to not worry about losing my a** on it. There are no property taxes either. The two parcels I sold last year had taxes that amounted to less than $50 per year per parcel.

I have traveled and camped extensively in AZ and TX. I do want to explore a little of what NM has to offer too.

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

Since: Dec 10

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#8954
Feb 14, 2013
 
WARRIOR wrote:
I woke up this morning to discover that some idiots in this state want to protect the lesser praire chicken. This will cost jobs no doubt. What a bunch of idiots!
That sounds very one-sided to me. Instead of jumping on the "idiots" for doing something so stupid, please become informed of the whole situation before making a decision either way. Have you ever seen a Lesser Prairie Chicken? I didn't think so. If you know nothing about it and never even seen one, how can you make an informed decision?(BTW, Most people don't care about protecting something they have never seen or don't even know exists.) Go find a LPC and watch it for awhile. Then tell me you don't want to protect it. I think you'd find there could be middle ground.

Jobs? What does protecting a bird from extinction have to do with people losing jobs?
Maybe the protection itself could create jobs?

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

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#8955
Feb 14, 2013
 
WARRIOR wrote:
<quoted text>Obama thinks he owns US!
Newsflash: He does!

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

Since: Dec 10

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#8956
Feb 14, 2013
 
Churmudgeon wrote:
Unless I miss my guess Ill bet those folks in greece have no hesitation about killing some bird or anything else that has meat on it bones and eating it!
Doesn't sound like it if they're fighting over the rations from the farm truck.

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

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#8957
Feb 14, 2013
 
Guest wrote:
<quoted text> When I was a girl, many, many years ago, I would see bees and butterflies all the time but not now. Why do you think that is?
Failing eyesight?

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

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#8958
Feb 14, 2013
 
Guest wrote:
<quoted text> When I was a girl, many, many years ago, I would see bees and butterflies all the time but not now. Why do you think that is?
In all seriousness...
There could be two things at play here.
1. You aren't actively out looking for these things. They are still around and you just don't see them.
OR
2. They indeed are disappearing. Many population declines are caused by man either dirctly or indirectly. These are a few of the the main causes of declining wildlife:
1. habitat destruction
2. non-native species
3. pesticides/chemicals

Both bees and caterpillars (future butterflies) are hit hard by pesticides.

Maybe genetically altered seeds have an effect?

Maybe Africanized bees have some negative imapct on honey bees?

Weeds (wildflowers) are mowed down before the butterflies emerge from their Chrysalis?

A combination of all of the above?

It's hard to say, but good question.

http://www.buzzaboutbees.net/missing-bees.htm...

If it's any consolation, on my recent trip to Arkansas, the field at the campground I stayed at was LOADED with Common Buckeyes, many of which were mating. It was a sight to see...really!

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

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#8959
Feb 14, 2013
 
Guest wrote:
<quoted text> When I was a girl, many, many years ago, I would see bees and butterflies all the time but not now. Why do you think that is?
On another note, I know a woman, now in her nineties, that was a bird watcher her whole life. She told me that when she was a young lady, there were so many more birds than there are now. The two examples she used were Indigo Buntings and Blackburnian Warblers.

She would spend the summers in Michigan's Upper Peninsula back then. Indigo Buntings were so abundant that on any given day, one could look outside at the food thrown on the ground and there was an easy 50 or 60 buntings hopping around picking up scraps. Now you are lucky to see 3 or 4 buntings at the same time.

During spring migration when the warblers were passing through this area, one could easily find 15 Blackburnian Warblers in one tree on a good day of birding. Now we are VERY LUCKY if we see 15 during the whole month of May when they pass through this area.

“Conserve Wildlife Habitat”

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#8960
Feb 14, 2013
 

Judged:

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Guest wrote:
<quoted text>Excellent advice.
Glen Beck predicted this would happen and the unrest that will spread to the US. He urged people to store food and prepare and people laughed at him.
I have heeded his advice and urge others to do the same. We can't depend on government to save us. Look at the Sandy victims.
I agree. That is good advice. Not only for now but for all times. I believe in always being prepared for anything! That's why I've taken steps to have my vehicle in good working order and have enough extra money and gas to get down to Churms place when the need arises. LOL.

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