Why are so many people in Kentucky on WELFARE?

Posted in the Prestonsburg Forum

First Prev
of 5
Next Last
Carrigan

Homosassa, FL

#1 Sep 4, 2011
I am completely amazed at the number of people in this state that are receiving welfare! And the number of people who claim to be "disabled". Why? Is it drug abuse? Lack of education? Children being born out of wedlock/teenage pregnancies? All of the above? I am so tired of supporting people who will not support themselves...and supporting the children they should have NEVER had! Medicaid pays for over 80% of the births in Kentucky! If you cannot afford to pay for even the birth of a child DO NOT HAVE ONE!! Why is that so difficult for some people to understand? Do they honestly not care about giving their child a good life?
tozi

Richmond, KY

#2 Sep 4, 2011
the problem is *Coal Mining*

Coal sucked the life out of this place. Years ago it prevented people from learning and growing. It prevent the youth from getting an educaqtion so that they could grow up to do bigger and better things; it prevented other industries from being able to come here and give the people options and opportunities. So now, no one knows how to do anythinbg but mine coal. So, if you can't find a job in the mines or you simply cannot do the work in a mine and you can't live somewhere else becuase you haven't an education then you are stuck right here, and you have no other option but to ask the governemnt for money because you have no other means of supporting yourself.

Get rid of coal and allow other businesses to move here and things will change. Not completely...but slowly it will get better.
Carrigan wrote:
I am completely amazed at the number of people in this state that are receiving welfare! And the number of people who claim to be "disabled". Why? Is it drug abuse? Lack of education? Children being born out of wedlock/teenage pregnancies? All of the above? I am so tired of supporting people who will not support themselves...and supporting the children they should have NEVER had! Medicaid pays for over 80% of the births in Kentucky! If you cannot afford to pay for even the birth of a child DO NOT HAVE ONE!! Why is that so difficult for some people to understand? Do they honestly not care about giving their child a good life?
Charlie

Mount Sterling, KY

#3 Sep 5, 2011
I disagree with tozi. When a child never sees a dad and mom work for anything, get food stamps, HUD and medical card, even get the phone bill paid in some instances, what kind of incentive do they give the child to work? There should be a cut-off limit as to how long they receive this help. Six months should be long enough to figure out if they love their drugs more than their kids. I know a lot of people will holler about what's going to happen to the children. Use all that "welfare' money to turn some of these huge abandoned buildings in to a place of refuge till their parents get cleaned up and have a place for their children. The kids would be much better off.
Rick

San Jose, CA

#4 Sep 5, 2011
i don't think it's the coal mines, people have a choice, and it's not the mines or the state, it's the people who choose to do nothing! i've lived here all my life, and i am 51, i never worked in a mines, i got my bachelors, and have a job in the technology field, like i said it's the people!
Wondering

Jacksonville, FL

#5 Sep 5, 2011
I concur with Rick.
zito

Georgetown, KY

#6 Sep 5, 2011
tozi wrote:
the problem is *Coal Mining*
Coal sucked the life out of this place. Years ago it prevented people from learning and growing. It prevent the youth from getting an educaqtion so that they could grow up to do bigger and better things; it prevented other industries from being able to come here and give the people options and opportunities. So now, no one knows how to do anythinbg but mine coal. So, if you can't find a job in the mines or you simply cannot do the work in a mine and you can't live somewhere else becuase you haven't an education then you are stuck right here, and you have no other option but to ask the governemnt for money because you have no other means of supporting yourself.
Get rid of coal and allow other businesses to move here and things will change. Not completely...but slowly it will get better.
<quoted text>
what kind of work are people able to do? another question, are people willing to work? it will be very difficult to break the old welfare habits of people as it has become a way of life around here for many.
tozi

United States

#7 Sep 5, 2011
So what will these people do for money to be able to take care of their children? If there aren't any jobs and no welfare then what?

I think you see the problem starting somewhere in the middle. The coal mining lead to the welfare, welfare lead to the drugs, the drugs lead to what is out there now. Check your history books. It wasn't coal mining to drugs to welfare it was coal mining to welfare to drugs.

People need jobs first before you take away their only source of income. You can't and shouldn't be cruel to people by taking away all means of income. That sort of thing will come back to haunt you later. People will become so desperate that they will rob you for money. Is that what you would prefer?

Once the jobs are there then the parents will be able to work.

And are you suggesting that women should never be stay at home moms? After all you said that a child should see a woman work in order to learn ethics.

I really don't think your plan will be very effective. Six months is not long enough to make the transition. And most jobs in Prestonsburg don't pay enough to take a person off the system.

Make all the abandon buildings a huge refuge huh? And what is the difference between that and welfare. None. It's the same.

We, could maybe use some of the abandoned buildings to create drug rehabs. Because getting off drugs isn't as easy as just saying don't do it anymore. That is part of it but after that then there has to be a complete mental overhaul.

Then using the abandon buildings as housing to get people out of the hollers would be a good idea too. These hollars are part of the problem too. When a person is stuck in a hollar with no means of transportation it has a way of discouraging people from working.

I guess in short the problem is really very complex. No easy answers here.
Charlie wrote:
I disagree with tozi. When a child never sees a dad and mom work for anything, get food stamps, HUD and medical card, even get the phone bill paid in some instances, what kind of incentive do they give the child to work? There should be a cut-off limit as to how long they receive this help. Six months should be long enough to figure out if they love their drugs more than their kids. I know a lot of people will holler about what's going to happen to the children. Use all that "welfare' money to turn some of these huge abandoned buildings in to a place of refuge till their parents get cleaned up and have a place for their children. The kids would be much better off.
tozi

United States

#8 Sep 5, 2011
Yep.

The people that choose to do nothing are those that have everything. And if you have lived here all your life I wonder just how objective you can possibly be.

Lots of people have bachelors degrees these days and no job to use them.

Don't know what your point is really.
Rick wrote:
i don't think it's the coal mines, people have a choice, and it's not the mines or the state, it's the people who choose to do nothing! i've lived here all my life, and i am 51, i never worked in a mines, i got my bachelors, and have a job in the technology field, like i said it's the people!
tozi

United States

#9 Sep 5, 2011
Here is a story from NPR. I thought it was important because it's a different opinion that says a kid doesn't learn from just the parents children also learn from their community. If both the parents and the community fail the kids then there isn't much hope in turning things around. There has to be job creation or else everyone loses.

Youth Joblessness Creates Ripple Effect
by Sonari Glinton
Not having a summer or after-school job affects more than just a kid's wallet. It also has real consequences for his or her personal and economic development.

While the overall unemployment rate is stuck at 9.1 percent, the unemployment rate for 16- to 19-year-olds has been going up since February. Currently 25.4 percent of teenagers who want jobs can't find them.

Kyle Hughes, 17, works in the cramped quarters of Dairy Queen in downtown Brighton, Mich. He puffs up with pride when he shows how a real expert makes a Blizzard. Besides knowing how to perfectly dip a cone, Kyle says he's learned some real lessons, like working with others, dealing with rude customers and managing his own money.

Heather Burrone, 19, says one thing she's learned at the Dairy Queen is that she doesn't want to make a career out of working there.

"I remember when I first started working here someone made me cry," she says. "It toughened me up a little bit. It got me a little bit used to criticism. It does make you a little bit tougher and understand how some people don't try to be mean to you, but they are."

It may seem trivial the lessons these teenagers are learning, but they form the foundation for a lifetime of work, says Dave Brewer, who studies the transition from adolescence to adulthood at Cornell University. He says teens who have jobs in high school are much more likely to have them when they're adults and that's not all.

"They go to college and complete college at greater rates, and so it's a very powerful indicator of career development and success after high school," Brewer says.

Getting and keeping a job also has a more immediate impact.

"[Students with jobs] tend to drop out at a lower rate. They also are more engaged in school because they understand why they're in school," Brewer says. "They're thinking about their careers and what they need to learn, the skills they need to obtain, the credentials they need to work toward when they go to college."

At the Prospect Park skate park in Ypsilanti, Mich., Ras Wright, 18, says he's been looking for work since the winter. He says he's applied for at least 15 jobs, including at Burger King and a couple restaurants.

"I get hassled by my mom," he says. "I'm trying, but it's just they don't call back."
Rutgers University economist Bill Rodgers says unless teens keep busy doing something useful, it's really hard for them to stay out of trouble.

"If these kids are idle for several summers, they potentially can get pulled toward illegal behavior," he says. "Once they get connected to the criminal justice system, the road becomes much more choppy."

Rodgers says not only will teens pay a price the longer they're delayed getting their first job, but so will society.
[Students with jobs] tend to drop out at a lower rate. They also are more engaged in school because they understand why they're in school.

- Dave Brewer, Cornell University

It may seem trivial the lessons these teenagers are learning, but they form the foundation for a lifetime of work, says Dave Brewer, who studies the transition from adolescence to adulthood at Cornell University
Carrigan

Homosassa, FL

#10 Sep 6, 2011
Maybe the jobs won't come because there are not enough people who will work. Or enough who can pass a drug test. Or since the "disability" rate is so high employers won't risk moving there because someone will get "hurt" while at work. Or because the people lack education. These are the problems that were mentioned by companies that were asked if they would consider moving their businesses to Kentucky. My husband does feasibility studies and was employed by a company that wants to open another operating center. We spent weeks up there and I could not believe what I saw. I'm not saying we didn't meet any educated, hard working people....we did...just not enough. And most of the local politicians were not helpful at all. I had the misfortune to go to a grocery store the day food stamps must have been distributed and I was amazed at what I saw! So many children whose parents could obviously not afford to raise them, yet they had them anyways! Kentucky is a beautiful state, but if the people don't change I'm afraid it's going to just die. Employers have to have people to employ...people willing to work. Welfare prevents people from wanting to work.
Someone that anit nasty

United States

#11 Sep 6, 2011
They can get a medical card and we the working class pay for them to be drug addicts. The law in congress should weed out alot. Hope support workers do their job and make them drug test if they suspect abuse. But then u get the story of I am prescribed this medication and then they should have to pay for levels testing. I think the generation of children r growing up by themselves Mostly don't have one good role model to them and like said before never seen anyone have to work and probably never will themselves. Definetely a complicated problem but needs all of our communities to pull together in effort to fix. Unfortuneatly most have the mindset it is none of my business but it affects all of us tax paying citizens and even the big USA
Charlie

Corbin, KY

#12 Sep 6, 2011
Tozi - Did God not say "earn your bread by the sweat of your brow?" The only sweat some of the "welfare people" have ever done is if their check "they worked so hard for' is a day or two late. Use the money the county spends for Tahoes, unnecessay trips, etc. to get this started. I'm sure a lot of state money pours into Floyd Co. each month. If the people are going to get welfare anyway make them do something to earn it. Let them pick up garbage, mow lawns for the elderly, do repair work for the elderly, sweep the streets, shovel the sidewalks, etc. As to when they could get their kids back I would say after they pass 6 drug tests. I love kids and hate to see them mistreated but we are doing them more harm by letting them stay with drunken, doped up parents. I'd be willing to spend 2 days a week caring for them and I am sure more Christian people would do the same.
hottdam

United States

#13 Sep 6, 2011
Charlie wrote:
I disagree with tozi. When a child never sees a dad and mom work for anything, get food stamps, HUD and medical card, even get the phone bill paid in some instances, what kind of incentive do they give the child to work? There should be a cut-off limit as to how long they receive this help. Six months should be long enough to figure out if they love their drugs more than their kids. I know a lot of people will holler about what's going to happen to the children. Use all that "welfare' money to turn some of these huge abandoned buildings in to a place of refuge till their parents get cleaned up and have a place for their children. The kids would be much better off.
I agree!!
hottdam

United States

#14 Sep 6, 2011
tozi wrote:
<quoted text>So what will these people do for money to be able to take care of their children? If there aren't any jobs and no welfare then what?

I think you see the problem starting somewhere in the middle. The coal mining lead to the welfare, welfare lead to the drugs, the drugs lead to what is out there now. Check your history books. It wasn't coal mining to drugs to welfare it was coal mining to welfare to drugs.

People need jobs first before you take away their only source of income. You can't and shouldn't be cruel to people by taking away all means of income. That sort of thing will come back to haunt you later. People will become so desperate that they will rob you for money. Is that what you would prefer?

Once the jobs are there then the parents will be able to work.

And are you suggesting that women should never be stay at home moms? After all you said that a child should see a woman work in order to learn ethics.

I really don't think your plan will be very effective. Six months is not long enough to make the transition. And most jobs in Prestonsburg don't pay enough to take a person off the system.

Make all the abandon buildings a huge refuge huh? And what is the difference between that and welfare. None. It's the same.

We, could maybe use some of the abandoned buildings to create drug rehabs. Because getting off drugs isn't as easy as just saying don't do it anymore. That is part of it but after that then there has to be a complete mental overhaul.

Then using the abandon buildings as housing to get people out of the hollers would be a good idea too. These hollars are part of the problem too. When a person is stuck in a hollar with no means of transportation it has a way of discouraging people from working.

I guess in short the problem is really very complex. No easy answers here.
Wrong!
hottdam

United States

#15 Sep 6, 2011
I am a 4th generation coal miner, I'm 22..

I'm not on drugs, I'm not on welfare..

Mining had nothing to do with it...

Laziness and an easy way out.
Children see children do,
I've worked for everything I have and so did my grandpa..

Monkey see monkey do..
hottdam

United States

#16 Sep 6, 2011
Carrigan wrote:
Maybe the jobs won't come because there are not enough people who will work. Or enough who can pass a drug test. Or since the "disability" rate is so high employers won't risk moving there because someone will get "hurt" while at work. Or because the people lack education. These are the problems that were mentioned by companies that were asked if they would consider moving their businesses to Kentucky. My husband does feasibility studies and was employed by a company that wants to open another operating center. We spent weeks up there and I could not believe what I saw. I'm not saying we didn't meet any educated, hard working people....we did...just not enough. And most of the local politicians were not helpful at all. I had the misfortune to go to a grocery store the day food stamps must have been distributed and I was amazed at what I saw! So many children whose parents could obviously not afford to raise them, yet they had them anyways! Kentucky is a beautiful state, but if the people don't change I'm afraid it's going to just die. Employers have to have people to employ...people willing to work. Welfare prevents people from wanting to work.
Couldn't say it better my self .. Eric c conn needs to be put out of business and be forced to pay back to state every dime he has scammed.
Charlie

Corbin, KY

#17 Sep 6, 2011
Hottdam - You sound like a person who has been well taught by someone with decent work ethics. Both my husband and I worked till retirement age, both my children and son-in-law works, all my brothers and sisters work, their children work- all because our parents worked and made us work when we were growing up. We were taught by God fearing parents who wanted the best for their children. None of us are rich but we aren't in debt up to our eyeballs either. Thanks Dad and Mom.
imdtf

United States

#18 Sep 6, 2011
Charlie wrote:
Hottdam - You sound like a person who has been well taught by someone with decent work ethics. Both my husband and I worked till retirement age, both my children and son-in-law works, all my brothers and sisters work, their children work- all because our parents worked and made us work when we were growing up. We were taught by God fearing parents who wanted the best for their children. None of us are rich but we aren't in debt up to our eyeballs either. Thanks Dad and Mom.
Exactly.. I'm not rich, I support myself and and I don't have to worry if my check is going to come this month.

Its all about how children are raised.

There is a totally different feeling when you can work and earn the house or vehicle you have, you will respect it and take better care of it, other than having it pretty much gave to me.
funny

Williamson, WV

#19 Sep 6, 2011
why work when u can get it for free off the tax payer...as long as unemployment is extended all the time and food stamps r given out free grazers wont work...i look at it this way...the mexicans sure dont have a problem finding work...
Thinker

Bowling Green, KY

#20 Sep 6, 2011
This area is an island of wealth in a sea of poverty. It has been like this since my life-time. There are not enough opportunities given so that people can live a decent life. People have been leaving this area for years in trying to find a better life. In fact, ones on welfare do prosper more than trying to work at jobs that offer no opportunity for advancement and pays less than welfare. I will say that this area is at its lowest morale than I have ever witnessed. No wonder people are on drugs. They are depressed and sinking deeper into poverty and have no life. The population number has also dwindled to the lowest, but this was predicted to happen back in the 60's.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 5
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Prestonsburg Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Add a word drop a word (Aug '11) 1 hr Analog man 4,813
The Alphabet Game. (Nov '12) 1 hr Analog man 2,430
Change a letter game (Aug '11) 1 hr Analog man 2,753
Two Words (Nov '13) 1 hr Analog man 1,876
Sabrina Howard at walmart 2 hr bebe 8
Jessica 4 hr Jessica 2
Needing an orthopedic surgeon for knee surgery 6 hr Family 6
PHS basketball 12 hr FXM 130
Prestonsburg Dating
Find my Match
More from around the web

Prestonsburg People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]

NFL Latest News

Updated 3:15 am PST

NBC Sports 3:15AM
Marvin Lewis on Andy Dalton: We don't have time to waste on QB competition
NBC Sports 6:32 AM
Panthers G.M. on Cam Newton: "We want him here. I want him here"
NBC Sports 3:31 PM
Report: Sal Sunseri to leave Florida State for position with Oakland Raiders
ESPN 8:07 AM
Spygate, 'culture of cheating' vexes ex-GM
Yahoo! Sports10:47 AM
Former Panthers GM wonders if Patriots cheated in their Super Bowl