Helicopter School Closing Costs Jacks...

Helicopter School Closing Costs Jacksonville Students

There are 11 comments on the First Coast News Jacksonville story from Feb 5, 2008, titled Helicopter School Closing Costs Jacksonville Students. In it, First Coast News Jacksonville reports that:

Talk Back: Post a comment on this article By Ryan Duffy First Coast News JACKSONVILLE, FL -- It has been Charity Haselip's dream to fly helicopters.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at First Coast News Jacksonville.

solution

Hillsborough, NJ

#1 Feb 6, 2008
Contact an attorney and try and put a lien or liens on one or more of the helicopters, which are the companies largest asset. Theres not much of a market for R22 pilots, Bell jetranger/longranger and Hughes300/500 are more common with municipalities, govt, and law enforcement, oil rig worker transport, etc. You would have to recertify in the bell or Hughes anyway. R22 is more of a 2 passenger toy for pseudo rich guys anyway. Good luck!
rdbjr

Toms River, NJ

#2 Feb 6, 2008
Learning to fly helicopters is enough work without worrying 1) if the mechanic's apprentice left off a critical bolt that you cannot check on pre-flight, 2) how to even come up with the lump sum that Silver State required before enrolling students, and 3) how many instructors you will be handed off to as each one hits the magic 1,000 hours to get a job flying turbines. Thankfully, as a student at a small but reliable helicopter school the maintenance is top notch with squawks addressed promptly, they offer a pay-as-you-go option in addition to getting educational loans, and although instructors everywhere are turning over when they reach their magical numbers in the logbooks there are many quality instructors around. I am sure that Silver State's Airola is laughing all the way to the bank even though he defrauded many students out of huge quantities of money. I hate to say this, but maybe the government needs to step in and write legislation forcing schools of any kind that request a lump sum payment to keep that money in escrow and only withdraw tuition as it is earned (with helicopters that is really easy to calculate as the rates are calculated on the aircraft time used and the instructor's time used, plus any supplies like charts, books, etc.).
Just Me

Jackson, SC

#3 Feb 6, 2008
rdbjr wrote:
Learning to fly helicopters is enough work without worrying 1) if the mechanic's apprentice left off a critical bolt that you cannot check on pre-flight, 2) how to even come up with the lump sum that Silver State required before enrolling students, and 3) how many instructors you will be handed off to as each one hits the magic 1,000 hours to get a job flying turbines. Thankfully, as a student at a small but reliable helicopter school the maintenance is top notch with squawks addressed promptly, they offer a pay-as-you-go option in addition to getting educational loans, and although instructors everywhere are turning over when they reach their magical numbers in the logbooks there are many quality instructors around. I am sure that Silver State's Airola is laughing all the way to the bank even though he defrauded many students out of huge quantities of money. I hate to say this, but maybe the government needs to step in and write legislation forcing schools of any kind that request a lump sum payment to keep that money in escrow and only withdraw tuition as it is earned (with helicopters that is really easy to calculate as the rates are calculated on the aircraft time used and the instructor's time used, plus any supplies like charts, books, etc.).
You are correct about that kind of money needs to be kept in escrow. But I don't think we need the government to "protect" us again. Think about how much you are putting out there and weight the risks if anything should occur. It's like putting your money in any business, do your research. Please don't ask the government to get involved. We've already seen how they handle their money.
haywoodya

Newnan, GA

#4 Feb 6, 2008
Seems to me this guy was only in it for the monies.... I 'd bet he probally has trained some foriegn students from the middle east that could pay the total tuition up front... Maybe the FBI needs to check this place out....
Ray

Jacksonville Beach, FL

#5 Feb 6, 2008
I can personally say that the apprentice done what he was told to do. He had no contact with that portion of the controls. The lead mechanic at the location never done his job and he was the guy that should have done it. He was just kind of lucky that he wasn't the one who put his name on the paper to sign off the helicopter. Also for the lawsuit deal, the only thing that the student can do is try to get an injunction on the bankruptcy because there is not going to be any return from the tuition since they filed Chapter 7. Good Luck
Silver State Tulsa OK

Durham, NC

#6 Feb 6, 2008
Tulsa also left high and dry. Hanging with $65,000 student loan.
they has to be an investigation as to where all this money went.
Jerry I hope to god you didn't just blow our money.
curious

Tucson, AZ

#7 Feb 6, 2008
why did Charity have to move to Jacksonville when there were at least three locations in Arizona?
Silver State DFW

Cleburne, TX

#8 Feb 6, 2008
The local schools in the DFW area have been having meetings to see how they can help those who are close to finish or just waiting for a check ride. Also informing how their program work as a pay as you go training program. One class member is gathering names to be part of a class action suite against Silver State in hopes of getting something back from them.
Judge Hangin

Raiford, FL

#9 Feb 6, 2008
I have posted this several times, but it should be posted again, and again. Read the NTSB report at http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/GenPDF.asp...

The mechanics were not aware of what they were doing. According to the report the work was sub-standard. The lead mechanic should be out of work. The FAA should take away his A & P license. The mechanic has little regard for human life, when he half did the work.

Sue them all - individually and collectively.
mblemmy

Saint Augustine, FL

#10 Feb 6, 2008
no one said there is a market for r-22 pilots. so if you were to do all your training in a bell 206 or h500 the cost would be 10 fold. the majority of the flight schools train in the r-22 the operating expense is low. once all tickets are earned than you get additional endorsements to fly the big money helicopters.
solution wrote:
Contact an attorney and try and put a lien or liens on one or more of the helicopters, which are the companies largest asset. Theres not much of a market for R22 pilots, Bell jetranger/longranger and Hughes300/500 are more common with municipalities, govt, and law enforcement, oil rig worker transport, etc. You would have to recertify in the bell or Hughes anyway. R22 is more of a 2 passenger toy for pseudo rich guys anyway. Good luck!
Maggots Mcghee

Macclenny, FL

#12 Dec 16, 2008
curious wrote:
why did Charity have to move to Jacksonville when there were at least three locations in Arizona?
why don't u mind your own god damn business?

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