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1 - 6 of 6 Comments Last updated Mar 10, 2014
Gail Hawthorne

Sayreville, NJ

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#1
Nov 26, 2010
 
This photo is the remains of the HP Beames Dairy Farm;the owner delivered milk to many Pompton Plains customers.

“Pequannock RealtorĀ® ”

Since: Jan 11

Pompton Plains

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#2
Jan 27, 2011
 
Gail,
My brother used to help milk the cows and I remember going with him and bringing home the fresh milk bottle with the cream on top. We used to ride horses up on the hill, this is now known as Keech Briar Rd.
Colleen
Margaret Grieshaber

Herndon, VA

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#3
Jul 6, 2011
 
With much interest, I saw the photos of my grandfather's (Hubert Pearson Beames [H.P.]) farm taken by Gail Hawthorne. My grandfather owned and operated the H. P. Beames Dairy located at 260 Sunset Road from approximately 1929, until his death in December 22, 1970, and at that time was the last dairy man in town. It was a small operation with about 30 Guernseys, Holsteins, and Jersey cows. Holsteins produce more milk, but for the delicious golden colored cream that floated to the top of my grandfather's long necked bottles, Guernseys and Jerseys were necessary. In the 1950's, my grandmother was still making butter with an old-fashioned butter churn. I gave it a try, but soon gave up because it's tedious churning butter.

The picture of the delapidated barn was not the milk barn, but a secondary barn used for extra cows and to store hay. This barn was behind the milking barn and it ran parallel to Sunset Road and by the 1950s, was used to store hay only. The milking barn, now gone, was built circa 1810, painted white, faced the north end of the house, and its door was close to Sunset Road where the cows were led out from in the mornings and called back to late afternoon/early evenings from where they were pastured across the road.

There was another picture Gail Hawthorne took of my grandfather's milk house (red building with white trim) which I can no longer find on the website, but it was where the milk was brought immediately after milking for processing (pastuerization) and bottling as well as sterilizing bottles and any other equipment used for milking.

My grandfather milked by hand only and hired local men to help him. One of those helpers was Cornelius Van Ness who walked every day to the farm from either 4th or 3rd Street in Pequannock (just off Jacksonville Road on the Pequannock side of the Boulevard). Milking requires strength, skill, tenacity, and patience as well as monitoring the cow's mood because at any time the animal could (and would) kick with painful results. Children weren't allowed in the area where the cows were milked, but my brothers, friends, and I could stand in front of the feeding troughs to watch. When he was old enough, my grandfather taught the oldest of my 2 brothers, Chuck Schober, how to milk.

When in Pompton Plains, I drive by the farm, and after many years of careful maintenance of the property, it's disappointing and sad to see its decline. The house was built pre-Civil War and was once called the Florida House after my step-grandmother, Ruby Hunt Beames, and her family moved in (approx. 1904) from Florida NY. I'll post pictures of a business card left at train stations to advertise room and board at Florida House, the house as it appeared circa 1904, a train ticket (look for Pompton Junction), and my grandfather in his milk truck about 1929.- Margaret Schober Grieshaber mesg427@hotmail.com
Marnie Poole

Burnaby, Canada

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#4
Nov 21, 2011
 
This is so interesting! Thanks to all who participated in this posting. I grew up with your grandfather's pasteurized milk, delivered to our door! Our mom was not well and could not digest homogenized milk. I remember, with great delight, the rich cream those Golden Guensey cows produced....It whipped up better than any cream I've experienced since then.
Thanks for rolling back the pages of time with both the pictures and the words!
Marnie
Gail Hawthorne

Wayne, NJ

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#5
Apr 27, 2012
 
Margaret Grieshaber wrote:
With much interest, I saw the photos of my grandfather's (Hubert Pearson Beames [H.P.]) farm taken by Gail Hawthorne. My grandfather owned and operated the H. P. Beames Dairy located at 260 Sunset Road from approximately 1929, until his death in December 22, 1970, and at that time was the last dairy man in town. It was a small operation with about 30 Guernseys, Holsteins, and Jersey cows. Holsteins produce more milk, but for the delicious golden colored cream that floated to the top of my grandfather's long necked bottles, Guernseys and Jerseys were necessary. In the 1950's, my grandmother was still making butter with an old-fashioned butter churn. I gave it a try, but soon gave up because it's tedious churning butter.
The picture of the delapidated barn was not the milk barn, but a secondary barn used for extra cows and to store hay. This barn was behind the milking barn and it ran parallel to Sunset Road and by the 1950s, was used to store hay only. The milking barn, now gone, was built circa 1810, painted white, faced the north end of the house, and its door was close to Sunset Road where the cows were led out from in the mornings and called back to late afternoon/early evenings from where they were pastured across the road.
There was another picture Gail Hawthorne took of my grandfather's milk house (red building with white trim) which I can no longer find on the website, but it was where the milk was brought immediately after milking for processing (pastuerization) and bottling as well as sterilizing bottles and any other equipment used for milking.
My grandfather milked by hand only and hired local men to help him. One of those helpers was Cornelius Van Ness who walked every day to the farm from either 4th or 3rd Street in Pequannock (just off Jacksonville Road on the Pequannock side of the Boulevard). Milking requires strength, skill, tenacity, and patience as well as monitoring the cow's mood because at any time the animal could (and would) kick with painful results. Children weren't allowed in the area where the cows were milked, but my brothers, friends, and I could stand in front of the feeding troughs to watch. When he was old enough, my grandfather taught the oldest of my 2 brothers, Chuck Schober, how to milk.
When in Pompton Plains, I drive by the farm, and after many years of careful maintenance of the property, it's disappointing and sad to see its decline. The house was built pre-Civil War and was once called the Florida House after my step-grandmother, Ruby Hunt Beames, and her family moved in (approx. 1904) from Florida NY. I'll post pictures of a business card left at train stations to advertise room and board at Florida House, the house as it appeared circa 1904, a train ticket (look for Pompton Junction), and my grandfather in his milk truck about 1929.- Margaret Schober Grieshaber mesg427@hotmail.com
Thank you Margaret for adding to the history.
Gail Hawthorne

Wayne, NJ

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#6
Mar 10, 2014
 
Marnie Poole wrote:
This is so interesting! Thanks to all who participated in this posting. I grew up with your grandfather's pasteurized milk, delivered to our door! Our mom was not well and could not digest homogenized milk. I remember, with great delight, the rich cream those Golden Guensey cows produced....It whipped up better than any cream I've experienced since then.
Thanks for rolling back the pages of time with both the pictures and the words!
Marnie
On behalf of one of the participants, thank you for appreciating the postings.

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