Look at crimes involving Hispanics re...

Look at crimes involving Hispanics reveals complex picture

There are 5290 comments on the Wilkes Barre, PA Times Leader story from Jun 4, 2006, titled Look at crimes involving Hispanics reveals complex picture. In it, Wilkes Barre, PA Times Leader reports that:

HAZLETON - A review of arrest records in the city over the last six years shows that the number of arrests of Hispanics seems in line with the city's booming Hispanic population over the same period.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Wilkes Barre, PA Times Leader.

what?

Scranton, PA

#5517 Jul 24, 2013
Fight the power

“ARSENAL, UTAH”

Since: Mar 11

Location hidden

#5518 Jul 25, 2013
flush plymourh wrote:
It is so nice to see that the area has not changed... You are still a bunch of close minded racist idiots who think going on vacation is whoooo to Tunkhannock. Get over yourselves you still have people in that town that say they are Irish or Polish and you are five generations past.. get over yourselves... read a book one that is not written by Dr. SUESS. BUT seriously making fun of a guy who said he was Puerto Rican get over it you racist fool... I am thankful i left the area when i did... so you can swallow yourselves in lard and eat haluski. Hispanic is an ethnic background not a race so get it right as well.. You pick on the Mexicans but they work... not like the welfare trash i remember of Plymouth... WOW you think you were rhe Hampton's your not even Dallas.
I agree 100%. The racist hate mongers in that area along with their bobble head sock puppets just plain hate latinos. They highlight every little item about latinos but ignore all the crimes and misdeed of the blacks, whites and yellows.
These trash talking haters think they are better than everyone else and that latinos are just plain scum. I see the hard working latinos and compare them to many blacks and whites and they do a lot better job than the other two groups.

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g

Scranton, PA

#5519 Jul 25, 2013
F**k all these rascist fools

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Gaping Snatch

Hazleton, PA

#5520 Jul 25, 2013
F*** me with a jack hammer!
Beach828

Brownsburg, IN

#5521 Jul 31, 2013
I am going to guess the salad mix was produced in California and processed by illegals/mexicans!

LINCOLN, Neb.(AP)— A food inspector says most — if not all — the prepackaged salad mix that sickened hundreds of people in Iowa and Nebraska wasn't grown in either state.

Iowa Food and Consumer Safety Bureau chief Steven Mandernach said Wednesday that at least 80 percent of the vegetables were grown and processed outside both states' jurisdictions. Mandernach says officials haven't confirmed the origins of 20 percent and may never know because victims can't always remember what they ate.

Officials have said the salad was infected with a rare parasite that causes a lengthy gastrointestinal illness. Outbreaks have been reported in 15 states, although it's not clear whether they're connected.

Mandernach says state law prohibits his office from releasing the information unless there's an immediate threat. Officials believe the threat has passed.

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Uh Oh

Mullica Hill, NJ

#5522 Aug 6, 2013
flush plymourh wrote:
It is so nice to see that the area has not changed... You are still a bunch of close minded racist idiots who think going on vacation is whoooo to Tunkhannock. Get over yourselves you still have people in that town that say they are Irish or Polish and you are five generations past.. get over yourselves... read a book one that is not written by Dr. SUESS. BUT seriously making fun of a guy who said he was Puerto Rican get over it you racist fool... I am thankful i left the area when i did... so you can swallow yourselves in lard and eat haluski. Hispanic is an ethnic background not a race so get it right as well.. You pick on the Mexicans but they work... not like the welfare trash i remember of Plymouth... WOW you think you were rhe Hampton's your not even Dallas.
Mexican drug cartels reportedly dispatching agents deep inside US
Published April 01, 2013
CHICAGO – Mexican drug cartels whose operatives once rarely ventured beyond the U.S. border are dispatching some of their most trusted agents to live and work deep inside the United States -- an emboldened presence that experts believe is meant to tighten their grip on the world's most lucrative narcotics market and maximize profits.
If left unchecked, authorities say, the cartels' move into the American interior could render the syndicates harder than ever to dislodge and pave the way for them to expand into other criminal enterprises such as prostitution, kidnapping-and-extortion rackets and money laundering.
Cartel activity in the U.S. is certainly not new. Starting in the 1990s, the ruthless syndicates became the nation's No. 1 supplier of illegal drugs, using unaffiliated middlemen to smuggle cocaine, marijuana and heroin beyond the border or even to grow pot here.
But a wide-ranging Associated Press review of federal court cases and government drug-enforcement data, plus interviews with many top law enforcement officials, indicate the groups have begun deploying agents from their inner circles to the U.S. Cartel operatives are suspected of running drug-distribution networks in at least nine non-border states, often in middle-class suburbs in the Midwest, South and Northeast.
"It's probably the most serious threat the United States has faced from organized crime," said Jack Riley, head of the Drug Enforcement Administration's Chicago office.
Years ago, Mexico faced the same problem -- of then-nascent cartels expanding their power -- "and didn't nip the problem in the bud," said Jack Killorin, head of an anti-trafficking program in Atlanta for the Office of National Drug Control Policy. "And see where they are now."
Riley sounds a similar alarm: "People think,`The border's 1,700 miles away. This isn't our problem.' Well, it is. These days, we operate as if Chicago is on the border."
Border states from Texas to California have long grappled with a cartel presence. But cases involving cartel members have now emerged in the suburbs of Chicago and Atlanta, as well as Columbus, Ohio, Louisville, Ky., and rural North Carolina. Suspects have also surfaced in Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota and Pennsylvania.
Mexican drug cartels "are taking over our neighborhoods," Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane warned a legislative committee in February. State Police Commissioner Frank Noonan disputed her claim, saying cartels are primarily drug suppliers, not the ones trafficking drugs on the ground.
Read it.

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Uh Oh

Mullica Hill, NJ

#5523 Aug 6, 2013
flush plymourh wrote:
It is so nice to see that the area has not changed... You are still a bunch of close minded racist idiots who think going on vacation is whoooo to Tunkhannock. Get over yourselves you still have people in that town that say they are Irish or Polish and you are five generations past.. get over yourselves... read a book one that is not written by Dr. SUESS. BUT seriously making fun of a guy who said he was Puerto Rican get over it you racist fool... I am thankful i left the area when i did... so you can swallow yourselves in lard and eat haluski. Hispanic is an ethnic background not a race so get it right as well.. You pick on the Mexicans but they work... not like the welfare trash i remember of Plymouth... WOW you think you were rhe Hampton's your not even Dallas.
Puerto Rico, Drug Corridor to the Mainland United States
By Phil Keating
Published August 09, 2012
San Juan, Puerto Rico – On the western coast of Puerto Rico, it’s wheels up for yet another night of high-tech hunting. Hunting, for cocaine smugglers.
“This boat looks interesting,” says officer Creighton Skeen, as he sits onboard a specially designed US Customs and Border Protection airplane. He and his partner typically sit alone, dimly lit in green, staring at and analyzing their wide-screens, which show the boats below.
On these routine missions, officer Skeen uses infra-red cameras, radar and one-the-ground intelligence to alert CBP 4 engine fast boats on the water when and where to interdict. This night, they’re focused on the 60 mile stretch between Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.
"Before, we didn't' see as many mother ships coming to Puerto Rico,” says Skeen.“Now, they're becoming ordinary."
And almost as ordinary, enormous busts like the one this week along the coast of Ponce. So much cocaine, it took a production line of people to haul heavy bag after heavy bag from the police cargo van to the table. Some of the cocaine bricks were labeled with a sticker showing a drawing of a threatening tiger, to discern which drug dealing organization supplied the coke, and who is to be paid the $20,000 for the kilo. By the time it arrives in the states, that kilo sells for $25,000.
This bust in total,“approximately 1000 kilos,” says Pedro Jasner, Agent in Charge for the Drug Enforcement Administration,“with a street value of 80-million dollars."
The US Commonwealth is booming as a trans-shipment point for the South American drug cartels. Because once the drugs get here, they’re much more easily smuggled into the US mainland as “domestic cargo,” with far fewer inspections.
But the eyes of US law enforcement are watching. CBP officers also operate in the bowels of the San Juan Post Office Processing Center, where the x-ray and cut open suspect parcels headed from the US Virgin Islands to the US, and vice versa. These mail inspections reveal the multi-billion dollar drug trade there, as well. In one box destined for South Carolina, three tightly-wrapped “burritos,” a package, within a package, within a package. Masked with laundry detergent, the chemical test confirms the inner package’s white powder is indeed cocaine. Another package, once cut open, immediately engulfs the room in a distinctive aroma.
“Most of the time it’s marijuana, cocaine and weapons,” says CBP Supervisor Carlos Morell.
But the bulk of the explosion in smuggling is coming in via boat, like the 1000 kilos captured off Ponce. Most of the drugs, agents say, are destined for the US East Coast, mainly entering the states through the Miami and New York City regions.
“We need more resources and this is the proof,” says Hector Pesquera, Puerto Rico Police Superintendent.
"We're not just saying it, we're showing it. 80% of this, 800 kilos, would have been going to the northeast corridor."

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carlos

United States

#5524 Aug 6, 2013
My my my, again today another white scumbag arrested for child pornography/assault charges. So somebody tell me, is this the way of white american life? What the [email protected]#! Is it that you lowlifes find so attractive about a child's behind? Is this something that is passed down thru the generations of white american lifestyle? You a-holes should be rounded up and put in an abandoned burning ship and let it be sunk in the middle of the ocean.

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Uh Oh

Mullica Hill, NJ

#5525 Aug 7, 2013
Nuevo Laredo’s Bloody May

The central highway that runs from Mexico to the United States crosses through the town of Nuevo Laredo, and the vast majority of road cargo between the two countries passes through there. That makes it a very desirable piece of turf for cartels. The Sinaloa cartel and the offshoot Zeta gang are engaged in a running struggle for control of Nuevo Laredo, and on a May weekend in 2012, things got really ugly. First, drivers spotted nine people hanging from a bridge, and then police found 14 headless men in a van. They later found the heads in 14 individual coolers. Just days later,

police found 49 mutilated bodies dumped by the side of a highway

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Uh Oh

Mullica Hill, NJ

#5526 Aug 7, 2013
Teen made $50,000 smuggling drugs across •Danny Santos, 21, says he made $50,000 in four years as a drug mule
•Santos smuggled drugs across U.S. border from Juarez, Mexico
•He was arrested once, as a juvenile, but said charges were dropped
•Santos now works two part-time jobs as trains as a boxer
Next Article in Crime »
EL PASO, Texas (CNN)-- Sitting in high school, math and history lessons never captured Danny Santos' imagination. The drug-fueled streets of the Texas-Mexico border provided his education, and he was an excellent student.
Danny Santos, 21, works two part-time jobs and still doesn't make as much as he did as a drug mule.
1 of 3 Santos says he became one of the thousands of American and Mexican teenagers recruited into the dangerous world of drug smuggling.
"I didn't care. I had no conscience," Santos said at a boxing gym in El Paso, Texas. "You're young, and you're naïve, and you think it's easy."
US. Customs and Border Protection officials in El Paso and San Diego report that in recent months, they've seen a rise in the number of juvenile drug smugglers getting busted at border checkpoints.
They're often called mules. These teenagers are usually hired only to smuggle drug loads across the border. Drug cartels "just need someone who can legitimately cross the border," said Bill Molaski, the El Paso Port Director for U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
As an American, Santos could freely cross the El Paso-Juarez border and not raise suspicion. At age 15, Santos says, he met "a guy" at a party who introduced him to drug kingpins in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.
"You start off as a driver," Santos said. "People feel like they can trust you, then you move up to something bigger."
Two weeks later, he got a $4,000 job offer to drive his first load of marijuana across a bridge into El Paso. It was the beginning of a four-year smuggling career.
In all, Santos says, he earned $50,000 making about 20 mule runs, driving right through heavily guarded border checkpoints.
Santos, who is now 21, says he was arrested once but spent only a few days in jail. He said charges were dropped. Because he was younger than 18 when he was arrested, and juvenile cases are sealed, CNN could not confirm his story through court records.
Young smugglers don't fit a stereotype. Several sources said that both American and Mexican teens are lured into the work. Teenage boys and girls alike are involved. Many smugglers come from middle-class families.
"There's a lot of money in the trade, a lot of inducement for a lot of young people to get involved," El Paso County Attorney Jose Rodriguez said. His office is responsible for prosecuting juvenile smugglers.
Federal and state authorities say drug cartels recruit young smugglers from schools. Depending on the size of the drug load that's being smuggled, a kid can be paid a couple hundred dollars up to $5,000.
Mexican officials say cartels have placed classified advertisements in Mexican newspapers with cryptic messages offering young people a job with good salary and benefits. A phone number is included in the ad.
The officials say a cartel member sets up a meeting to determine whether the kid is up to the job.
But Rodriguez offers a chilling reason why teenagers should avoid the lure of easy money.
"We had a kid here who lost a load and had some of his toes chopped off," Rodriguez said.
Santos says he got out of the smuggling business two years ago. Santos is working two part-time jobs, and he says it takes him two months to earn the money that he used to make in one day of drug smuggling. He spent almost all the money he made smuggling. But he has no regrets.

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Uh Oh

Mullica Hill, NJ

#5527 Aug 7, 2013
You People who defend the Illegals sound like a five year olds. First, there are more Americans killed in the US by illegals than are killed in both wars. An American family on a day trip to Mexico within the past month had their three (3) year old daughter abducted right from under their feet by one of the Mexican Drug Cartels. The 3 year old was found later sitting in an infant seat in the backseat of a car trying to cross the border into the
U. S.. She appeared to be asleep in the infant seat, but in fact she had been murdered by the Cartel and her body was stuffed with cocaine that the Cartel was trying to smuggle into the U. S. in this little girl's body. They made her into a suitcase and the American News Corporations reported NONE OF THIS TO AMERICANS

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carlos

United States

#5528 Aug 7, 2013
My my my, two more squalid white scunbags arrested, one for child pornography, and the other for raping a 12 year old girl, you sick assholic buckets of s h I t!

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Jack

Belle Vernon, PA

#5529 Aug 8, 2013
FOXFOXFOX wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree 100%. The racist hate mongers in that area along with their bobble head sock puppets just plain hate latinos. They highlight every little item about latinos but ignore all the crimes and misdeed of the blacks, whites and yellows.
These trash talking haters think they are better than everyone else and that latinos are just plain scum. I see the hard working latinos and compare them to many blacks and whites and they do a lot better job than the other two groups.
Atta boy Col. Klink. I see Mommy let you have your computer time back.

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Sheeeeesh

Mullica Hill, NJ

#5530 Aug 8, 2013
carlos wrote:
My my my, two more squalid white scunbags arrested, one for child pornography, and the other for raping a 12 year old girl, you sick assholic buckets of s h I t!
Just watched a video of some cartel members beheading 2 others with a chainsaw and a knife....wow....first coups all over Latin America...then Colombian neckties...now this.....guess that's the next new cultural diversity tradition we will experience here soon

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wow

Mullica Hill, NJ

#5531 Aug 8, 2013
Beach828 wrote:
I am going to guess the salad mix was produced in California and processed by illegals/mexicans!
LINCOLN, Neb.(AP)— A food inspector says most — if not all — the prepackaged salad mix that sickened hundreds of people in Iowa and Nebraska wasn't grown in either state.
Iowa Food and Consumer Safety Bureau chief Steven Mandernach said Wednesday that at least 80 percent of the vegetables were grown and processed outside both states' jurisdictions. Mandernach says officials haven't confirmed the origins of 20 percent and may never know because victims can't always remember what they ate.
Officials have said the salad was infected with a rare parasite that causes a lengthy gastrointestinal illness. Outbreaks have been reported in 15 states, although it's not clear whether they're connected.
Mandernach says state law prohibits his office from releasing the information unless there's an immediate threat. Officials believe the threat has passed.
Taylor Farms of Mexico, the company that makes a salad mix identified as the source of a parasite outbreak, is a supplier of a major restaurant chain in the United States.

The division of a California-based produce supplier was identified by the Food and Drug Administration as the source of parasite-tainted products that sickened hundreds of people in Nebraska and Iowa. It is not clear if the company was also responsible for a cyclospora outbreak that left more than 400 people from 16 US states ill.

It is not believed the tainted salad was sold to customers in stores, but has been linked to restaurants.

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“A Dog's Life is Good”

Since: Feb 11

Mon Valley, Pa.

#5533 Aug 9, 2013
wow wrote:
<quoted text>
Taylor Farms of Mexico, the company that makes a salad mix identified as the source of a parasite outbreak, is a supplier of a major restaurant chain in the United States.
The division of a California-based produce supplier was identified by the Food and Drug Administration as the source of parasite-tainted products that sickened hundreds of people in Nebraska and Iowa. It is not clear if the company was also responsible for a cyclospora outbreak that left more than 400 people from 16 US states ill.
It is not believed the tainted salad was sold to customers in stores, but has been linked to restaurants.
I believe any one with half a brain has knowledge of the toilet training of the mexican farm worker.

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hummmm

Woodstown, NJ

#5534 Aug 10, 2013
Common sense seems to have been lost in this country...

If I had people come to my door who did nothing but suck all my money and resources from me and brought nothing but drugs, guns and violence...they would not get into my house

But politicians and corporations profit from them, therefore...we are screwed.

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uh oh

Woodstown, NJ

#5535 Aug 10, 2013
An Italian judge ordered 49 alleged gang members to stand trial for purportedly using dogs to smuggle cocaine from Latin America to Europe before killing them.

A veterinarian in Mexico apparently forced the dogs, usually large breeds like Great Danes, Labradors and Mastiffs, to swallow large packets of drugs before being flown to Italy, where the dogs were then killed and dismembered to retrieve the cocaine.

The drug packages were shielded in black vinyl tape so they would not be detectable by airport X-rays. Authorities said at least 48 dogs were killed to retrieve the drugs.

Niceeeeeee.........

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uh oh

Woodstown, NJ

#5536 Aug 10, 2013
By Daniel Arkin, Staff Writer, NBC News
A self-described debt collector for Mexican drug cartels says he has slayed more than 30 people across the United States, according to investigators.
If Jose Martinez, 51, is found guilty of scores of homicides on both coasts, he would earn a place among the most lethal serial murderers in American history.
Investigators have confirmed that Martinez is responsible for a 2006 double-homicide in Marion County, Fla., a March homicide in Lawrence County, Ala., and at least 10 other killings in California, according to sheriff’s officials.
Martinez, a U.S. citizen, told investigators that he committed those murders and more than a dozen others as an enforcer for multiple Mexican drug lords, according to Lawrence County Sheriff’s Capt. Tim McWhorter.
Advertise | AdChoices“He basically told us,‘I’m the guy that pays you a visit when you don’t pay the cartel,” McWhorter said.“He had a reputation in the drug world as the guy who would get the job done. If he was assigned to get money, he’d get money. If he was assigned to kill, he’d kill.”
A trail of bloodshed
The alleged killer's startling admissions to officials in Alabama—where investigators from all relevant states converged in early June to interview the suspect—came nearly four months after detectives in Florida found key evidence linking Martinez to a 7-year-old cold case, according to Marion County, Fla., Det. T.J. Watts.
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Beach828

Brownsburg, IN

#5537 Oct 19, 2013
NEW YORK (AP)— Detectives solved the decades-old mystery of "Baby Hope," a little girl whose body was discovered inside a picnic cooler beside a Manhattan highway in 1991, and arrested a relative of the child Saturday after he admitted he sexually assaulted and smothered her, police said.

Conrado Juarez, 52, was arrested on a murder charge and was awaiting arraignment. Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said Juarez claimed he killed the girl at his sister's apartment and that she helped him dispose of the body.
The girl's name, age and circumstances of her death were unknown for more than two decades. But earlier this week, police announced that a new tip and a DNA test had allowed them to finally identify the baby's mother, a dramatic turnaround in one of the city's more notorious cold cases.

On Saturday, they also revealed the girl's name: Anjelica Castillo, age 4.

The child's naked, malnourished corpse was discovered on July 23, 1991, beside the Henry Hudson Parkway by construction workers who smelled something rotten. Detectives thought she might have been suffocated but had few other clues as to what happened.

The case became an obsession for some investigators who nicknamed the girl "Baby Hope." Hundreds of people attended a funeral for the unknown girl in 1993. Her body was exhumed for DNA testing in 2007, and then again in 2011.

In July, detectives tried another round of publicity on the 22nd anniversary of the discovery. They canvassed the neighborhood where her body was found, hung fliers, circulated sketches of the girl and a photograph of the cooler and announced a $12,000 reward for information leading to an arrest.

Former detective Jerry Giorgio, who had the case from 1991 until his retirement over the summer, said he remained confident the case could be solved. Assistant Chief Joseph Reznick, who also worked the case, said they never gave up.

"I think reflecting back on what we named this little girl, Baby Hope, I think it's the most accurate name we could have come up with," Reznick said.

Giorgio left the NYPD and went to the Manhattan district attorney's cold case squad, from which he retired this year. "I missed the tipster call by a couple of weeks, damn it," he said.

The tipster, who saw the recent news stories on the case, led police to Anjelica's sister, who told detectives she thought her sister had been killed. Police matched DNA from Anjelica to their mother. The mother, who was not identified, didn't have custody of Anjelica at the time of the girl's death — she had been living with relatives on the father's side, including Balvina Juarez-Ramirez, police said.

Juarez-Ramirez is the sister of Juarez. Police closed in on the suspect and waited for him Friday outside a Manhattan restaurant where he worked as a dishwasher. He told them he noticed Anjelica while visiting the family apartment and killed her, police said.

"When she went motionless, he summoned his sister from another room," Kelly said.

Then, the sister got the blue cooler — which still contained full cans of Coke. They took a livery cab from Queens to Manhattan where they dumped the cooler, then separated.

Her parents never reported her missing, though they had contact with the suspect. Juarez had never been considered a suspect before. Police refused to say whether he had previous arrests or had been accused in other sexual assaults.

Kelly called the arrest a superb case of detective work, and said he was proud of his officers.

"For me, it makes you proud to be a member of this organization — they were unrelenting," he said.

The detectives assigned to the case were instrumental in organizing a burial in a Bronx cemetery for the girl in 1993. Hundreds attended the funeral; Reznick gave the eulogy. The girl was dressed in a white frock and buried in a white coffin.

The detectives paid for the girl's headstone that reads: "Because we care."

On the tomb sit two little angels.

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