"Fair Tax" would replace state income...

"Fair Tax" would replace state income and business taxes

There are 233 comments on the WZZM Grand Rapids story from Oct 31, 2007, titled "Fair Tax" would replace state income and business taxes. In it, WZZM Grand Rapids reports that:

Wyoming - Instead of a service tax, a sales tax, an income tax and a business tax, a West Michigan lawmaker ways the state should just have a "Fair Tax". "We need to totally reform our tax structure," says ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at WZZM Grand Rapids.

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John

Allendale, MI

#1 Oct 31, 2007
Alan Greenspan correctly told Congress a few years ago that "Businesses really pay no taxes. People pay taxes."

What I like about the Fair Tax idea is that it gets all of our taxes that we pay out into the open where we can see them instead of hiding 2/3 of them in the prices of everything we pay.

Let's get rid of this old archaic tax ystem that picks winners and losers!
Ron

United States

#2 Oct 31, 2007
Taxes that we make businesses pay/collect are just added to the price of what we buy like all the other materials and services they pay for to make a product. The higher these added tax costs are the decreased likelihood of selling our products to other people outside of Michigan! I say adopting the MI FairTax will create more jobs here by making our products more competitive.

It is progressive by giving back a households tax cost every month on spending up to the poverty level which protects low income, Seniors and others on fixed incomes. We need to be better than other states not 'just as good'.

No more individual tax reporting, can you imagine that! Personnally I'd rather pay taxes and have a job than be poor and unemployed! Go MI FairTax!
www.mifairtax.org
Ian

Saline, MI

#3 Oct 31, 2007
THEY'RE KILLING GOLDEN-EGG-LAYING GEESE IN MICHIGAN

Michigan has - under liberal, central-planning leadership that seeks to pick "winners and losers," - pressed for bigger and bigger programs, costing more and more tax dollars.

Business - the Golden Goose that provides jobs - has been choked, and is wobbling to get out from under the choke hold by crossing the state line.

Michigan consumers have been paying business's taxes in HIGHER PRICES, a neatly hidden tax that the politicians figured could go on forever.

When Michigan re-elected Gov. Jennifer Granholm, after the first miserable four years, instead of a person who understood about how Golden Geese propagate, what did they expect? And to add insult to injury, they gave the Michigan House away to poltical types that feel oh so comfortable taking from the producers to build a captive constituency.

There is a long-term solution for Michigan voters: It's called scrapping the Michigan Income Tax, and enacting the Michigan FairTax ( http://michiganfairtax.org ). Under the FairTax, Michiganders, visitors - even illegals - will pay for government the way Michigan working families are paid, when something is sold.

Under a Michigan FairTax, no more politicians' hands in our family paychecks; no more politicians' hands in our business checkbooks. No more income tax code to harass families with audits, interest, penalties, even confiscation of personal property.

Under a Michigan FairTax consumption tax, Michigan families pay for government in the process of meeting their family's needs. And every Michigan resident family will receive an advance monthly reimbursement on taxes expected to be paid on poverty-level spending based on family size. Thus, it is a progressive tax system, yet voluntary because it will apply only on new retail purchases (not used) and on services.

The Michigan FairTax is a revenue-neutral proposal that will put Michigan workers in charge with information on the cost of Michigan government on every retail receipt! And, the politicians will no longer be able to pit poor against rich, individual/family against business.

“Insert witty comment <here>”

Since: Aug 07

Wyoming, MI

#4 Oct 31, 2007
I love the idea of a fair tax. The issue is, however, what is to stop the businesses in Michigan from keeping their prices the same after the tax is implemented and taking a higher profit? Nothing.

What will the businesses in Michigan do with the extra income they bring in? Will they pass it along to the people that work for them? No, they will pass it along in the form of dividends to the stockholders.

So what would the end result be? More Michigan workers get screwed over in the deal. Sure the businesses see a short-term windfall, but if people in Michigan see huge inflation in prices from this tax, then they won't be buying goods like they used to.

They paint a rosy picture on the mifairtax.org site, and if all the things they propose were put in place, then it could actually be a benefit, but business, like government, is loathe to give up what they see as "free money."

The government wouldn't agree to the monthly or annual "prebate" and the businesses would not pass their cost savings to the consumer, nor would they pass the extra profit on to the workers.

Make it work- and make it work the way it is presented on the site, and I am for it. I am also a realist, and must approach the implementation of such an idea with great skepticism.
Brandi

United States

#5 Oct 31, 2007
Why do we need to up the taxes, What we really need are jobs not higher taxes!!!
Suzette

AOL

#6 Nov 1, 2007
I believe this would be a great plan, I think it would bring businesses back to Michigan, thus putting more people to work and lighting the strain on the welfare system. And those that are here illegally or work for cash under the table would not be exempt from paying taxes, therefore bringing alot more income in for the state.
Brett Kennedy

Traverse City, MI

#7 Nov 1, 2007
I would have the same questions and concerns like Saif commented. Hell I consider myself a democrat and I love this idea from the sounds of it. Of course I'd like to see what nay-sayers have to say about it.

But I mean seriously, get rid of all these complicated taxes, put it in ONE state tax, and could possibly generate more revenue than the taxes are right now.

My only concern is yeah we'd have more money in our paychecks - but does it all really balance out at the end of the year? Because person A may spend more than person B and person A may have a lower income than person B - does this mean that the middle class is getting yet screwed again? Does it all really add up and equal out? Will companies that we work for offer bigger salaries for us to afford 1 high tax? Would services be included in this tax?

I personally think the tax should be divided up and have a sales tax and a food tax. We had a sales, food, and county tax when I lived in Raleigh - but on the flip side because the food tax was so low (2%) the prices were OUTRAGEOUS. For example, a 1 gallon tub of ice cream you can get at meijer for what 2-3 dollars, you will be paying 6 dollars in Raleigh. Although cost of living is a little bit different.

So I have mixed feelings about this tax - but mostly in favor of considering it.
daniel

United States

#8 Nov 1, 2007
The Fair Tax is desperately needed, not only at the State level, but the Federal level also.

Paying a "one time" tax on everything new you purchase, while eliminating income taxes totally, would make our economy really boom.

Let's make Michigan a national leader, and implement the Fair Tax as soon as possible.
Gary

Colorado Springs, CO

#9 Nov 1, 2007
They need to do some thing about bring more jobs here. For were thinking of boxing up and moving out of this job less state. GO FAIRTAX
eric

Zeeland, MI

#10 Nov 1, 2007
daniel wrote:
The Fair Tax is desperately needed, not only at the State level, but the Federal level also.
Paying a "one time" tax on everything new you purchase, while eliminating income taxes totally, would make our economy really boom.
Let's make Michigan a national leader, and implement the Fair Tax as soon as possible.
I totally agree with this create a national fair tax just as being proposed here, and lets et it implemented here. No more tax dodging.If you spend any money in the country the tax would be collected. No more money wasted on the IRS either.

Since: Oct 07

Big Rapids, MI

#11 Nov 1, 2007
Saif wrote:
I love the idea of a fair tax. The issue is, however, what is to stop the businesses in Michigan from keeping their prices the same after the tax is implemented and taking a higher profit? Nothing.
What will the businesses in Michigan do with the extra income they bring in? Will they pass it along to the people that work for them? No, they will pass it along in the form of dividends to the stockholders.
So what would the end result be? More Michigan workers get screwed over in the deal. Sure the businesses see a short-term windfall, but if people in Michigan see huge inflation in prices from this tax, then they won't be buying goods like they used to.
They paint a rosy picture on the mifairtax.org site, and if all the things they propose were put in place, then it could actually be a benefit, but business, like government, is loathe to give up what they see as "free money."
The government wouldn't agree to the monthly or annual "prebate" and the businesses would not pass their cost savings to the consumer, nor would they pass the extra profit on to the workers.
Make it work- and make it work the way it is presented on the site, and I am for it. I am also a realist, and must approach the implementation of such an idea with great skepticism.
Leave it to a democrap (no mis-spelling) to see that businesses shouldn't be allowed to make a fair profit. Maybe besides this new tax, we could have you setting all the prices that businesses could charge. I'd love to see that. Why don't you give us an example of what a fair price/profit for various items should be.
David Kasprzyk

Boynton Beach, FL

#12 Nov 1, 2007
How is this a "fair" tax? Those who can afford to pay it the least would pay the most of their income. 9.5% of poverty income is too much. A "fair tax" treats all income levels more equally in terms of percentage of disposable income.
Lloyd

Oscoda, MI

#13 Nov 1, 2007
My job went to Mexico, at age 61 I can't find a job.My county & City raised my taxes. The cost of heat & lights has gone up. There are families all around me who lost their home. I bet if someone checked Belding has the most forclosers of any city. Fair tax is the only way to go. Thanks
Dan Blanton

United States

#14 Nov 1, 2007
The Fair Tax will help make Michigan more competitve leading to more jobs in our state. Drug dealing and other sources of illegal income would be required to pay this tax. These taxes are not selective in their discrimiation as the service taxes enacted by the legislature are.
R Darlison

Baldwinsville, NY

#15 Nov 1, 2007
I don't understand how this could be called a "fair" tax at all. It would just help the rich get richer. If you have a low income you have to spend all of it just to live. If you have a high income you only spend a small portion to live. Any money the wealthy earn and save or invest would go un-taxed. As would that they spend on lavish vacations in other states or countries. If they want to buy some expensive clothes or anything alse for that matter they would need only go shopping out of state. They would get a HUGE benefit from this type of tax while the poor and lower middle class foot the bill.

It would also be unfair to those living in the middle of the state. Those of us lucky enough to live near the border can just do our shopping accross the border.

This would be a very bad idea!

The only truly fair taxes are income taxes. The more you earn the more you pay. We would be much better off if we just stick with a simple income tax and eliminate all the "loop-holes". It would make more sense to raise income tax and eliminate sales tax.
jim walters

AOL

#16 Nov 1, 2007
we need the fair tax to bring michigan jobs and to get our econemy back on track.
now

United States

#17 Nov 1, 2007
it's about time...hay Wayne Kuipers...gonna support this one
yah jerk
Jen

Big Rapids, MI

#18 Nov 1, 2007
This tax needs to be studied carefully. The implications of its effect on the cost utilites and services could be greater than anticipated. Heat and electric have already gone up and are forecasted to rise again. How will a 3.5 cent tax increase affect the true price of those necessities?
Michigan Citizen

Ionia, MI

#19 Nov 1, 2007
This is a worthwhile pursuit for our troubled state. The "Fair Tax" system was designed by some of our country's brightest economic minds from a number of universities. Let's offer our state some relief from oppressive and ineffective tax structures. With success, we can move it to the national level. No country employing Fair Tax has ever moved back to a system like ours.
Michigan Citizen

Ionia, MI

#20 Nov 1, 2007
RE:R Darlingson - Please study the desogn of the Fair Tax. The poverty level and dependents are accommodated with "prebates", paid so they can live tax-free to a certain level of income. In addition, you would have just given them a 30% raise (if enacted at the national level). The Fair Tax is not a hair-brained political scheme but rather an expertly designed system that is used to great success in other countries.

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