Health Insurers Limit Advanced Scans

Health Insurers Limit Advanced Scans

There are 2 comments on the Baltimore Sun story from Mar 24, 2008, titled Health Insurers Limit Advanced Scans. In it, Baltimore Sun reports that:

Insurance companies are taking a harder look at advanced medical scans like CT scans, citing spiraling costs and safety concerns.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Baltimore Sun.

Andrew Whitman

Alexandria, VA

#1 Mar 24, 2008
Linda Johnson's article shines a light on insurer company efforts to restrict patient access to life-saving medical imaging technologies. Patients should be skeptical of insurers' decisions to pre-authorize some screening as a means of reducing costs, especially if they view fewer medical images as a "success,” without concern for improved patient care.
Medical imaging is integral to many diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines, and it is short-sighted to ignore the data that demonstrates the value of medical imaging to health outcomes and savings. The American Cancer Society's endorsement of virtual colonoscopies as part colon cancer screen guidelines serves as a prime example.
Appropriateness criteria and accreditation are important for ensuring the most suitable and safe use of imaging for patients. While cost is also a necessary consideration in healthcare delivery, imaging continues to prove its worth through documented cost savings and improved patient outcomes. We recently saw this with Medicare’s decision to cover heart scans. When the data is fully evaluated, the value of this integral technology cannot be denied.
Andrew Whitman

Alexandria, VA

#2 Mar 24, 2008
Linda Johnson's article shines a light on insurer company efforts to restrict patient access to life-saving medical imaging technologies. Patients should be skeptical of insurers' decisions to pre-authorize some screening as a means of reducing costs, especially if they view fewer medical images as a "success,” without concern for improved patient care.



Medical imaging is integral to many diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines, and it is short-sighted to ignore the data that demonstrates the value of medical imaging to health outcomes and savings. The American Cancer Society's endorsement of virtual colonoscopies as part colon cancer screen guidelines serves as a prime example.



Appropriateness criteria and accreditation are important for ensuring the most suitable and safe use of imaging for patients. While cost is also a necessary consideration in healthcare delivery, imaging continues to prove its worth through documented cost savings and improved patient outcomes. We recently saw this with Medicare’s decision to cover heart scans. When the data is fully evaluated, the value of this integral technology cannot be denied.

Andrew Whitman
Executive Director
Medical Imaging & Technology Alliance (MITA)

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Plainsboro Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Church vs. state: More than a battle of Christm... (Nov '16) 2 hr samt 5
News Princeton researcher explores Southern Ocean pa... (Oct '13) Aug 9 Madison 6
News Changes in the air at two radio stations (Aug '06) Jul 27 Lewis H 1,036
Looking for birth mom May '17 Angela 2
Hit and Run Wednesday Night May '17 sbnewsman1 1
Princeton North Music Thread Mar '17 Musikologist 3
Did you know NJ adoptees can request their orig... (Jan '17) Jan '17 joanNYadoptees 1

Plainsboro Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Plainsboro Mortgages