Why does it take 6 months or longer to arrest a drug dealer?

Posted in the Pikeville Forum

First Prev
of 2
Next Last
Citizen

Pikeville, KY

#1 Oct 26, 2011
I've read many stories locally about busting drug dealers and most of them mention that the person/people arrested were under surveillance for months. Why don't they make an arrest when they witness the first deal?

“DECIMATOR OF KNIGHTS”

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#2 Oct 26, 2011
More than likely an arrest generated from one single
incident would be rather flimsy and easily defeated in court I assume. With months of surveillance the police can establish a pattern / lifestyle of selling
drugs and have multiple incidents on record.
Citizen

Pikeville, KY

#3 Oct 26, 2011
THE LEGEND HIMSELF wrote:
More than likely an arrest generated from one single
incident would be rather flimsy and easily defeated in court I assume. With months of surveillance the police can establish a pattern / lifestyle of selling
drugs and have multiple incidents on record.
I'm sure that has a lot to do with it. But it makes no sense. If they can catch someone on video selling a pill, then that should be an open and shut case. The legal system is pathetic. It shows too much favoritism towards the law-breakers.

“DECIMATOR OF KNIGHTS”

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#4 Oct 26, 2011
Citizen wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm sure that has a lot to do with it. But it makes no sense. If they can catch someone on video selling a pill, then that should be an open and shut case. The legal system is pathetic. It shows too much favoritism towards the law-breakers.
I agree with you, the Courts victimize victims further and perpetrate injustices in the name of Justice itself, it's a joke.
wymt news

Pikeville, KY

#5 Oct 26, 2011
Citizen wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm sure that has a lot to do with it. But it makes no sense. If they can catch someone on video selling a pill, then that should be an open and shut case. The legal system is pathetic. It shows too much favoritism towards the law-breakers.
From WYMT.com :

October 26, 2011

MANCHESTER – Two former Manchester City Police officers were among those arrested on drug trafficking charges during a roundup conducted Tuesday, October 25.

By early afternoon 10 of the 15 suspects were in custody.

The arrests followed a six-month undercover investigation by Operation UNITE and the Manchester Police Department.

Most of the suspects were wanted for illegally diverting prescription medications – primarily Hydrocodone, Oxycodone and Xanax – and lived within a centralized area of Manchester near the Clay County Courthouse.

“They were mostly from the same small community along Bridge Street, River Street and Baker Street,” said Police Chief Chris Fultz, adding a majority of the others lived within or near the city limits.

Law enforcement officers from UNITE, the Manchester Police Department, Clay County Sheriff’s Office, Kentucky State Police and U.S. Marshal Service began searching for suspects shortly after 8 a.m.

“Units came down Baker and Bridge streets to River Street,” Fultz said.“We went door-to-door checking every apartment and looking for these suspects and others for whom we had warrants.”

In addition to the drug-related cases, officers arrested six individuals on other warrants.

Among those arrested were former city police Officer Randall Dodson, 47, of Manchester Heights, and former Sgt. Scotty D. Sandlin, 37, of Wayne Street. Both Manchester men were charged with first-degree trafficking in a controlled substance.

“They were friends of mine,” Fultz said.“It’s sad how life has turned for them.”

“If you’re willing to deal drugs we’re not putting up with it,” Fultz continued.“Your social status doesn’t matter. If you’re willing to deal drugs we’re coming after you.”

Others arrested Tuesday were:

• Randall “Randy” Burns, 46, of River Street, Manchester, second-degree trafficking in a controlled substance.

• Kenneth Fields, 48, of River Street, Manchester, second-degree trafficking in a controlled substance.

• Sherry Hall, 42, of Baker Street, Manchester, second-degree trafficking in a controlled substance.

• Shannon McQueen, 29, Highway 687, Manchester, second-degree trafficking in a controlled substance.

• Brenda Smith, 36, of T Street, Manchester, third-degree trafficking in a controlled substance.

• Terry Smith, 34, of Mill Pond, second-degree trafficking in a controlled substance and third-degree trafficking in a controlled substance.

• Jerry Travillion, 44, of Caudill Gap, Manchester, trafficking in marijuana.

• Eric Walker, 24, of Pennington Hill, first-degree trafficking in a controlled substance.

“Hopefully this investigation will send a message to Manchester that illegal drug activity will be aggressively investigated,” said Paul Hays, deputy law enforcement director for UNITE.

“We intend to take back our community from the drug dealers,” Hays continued.“We need community leaders and citizens to stand with us.”

Chief Fultz praised the teamwork that went into both the investigation and roundup.“It shows what cooperation between agencies can accomplish.”

Police are continuing to search for the remaining five suspects.

For more information about Operation UNITE visit their website at www.operationunite.org .

“DECIMATOR OF KNIGHTS”

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#6 Oct 26, 2011
There was a recent story her ein letcher Co. I found of interest. It may be somewhat OFFTOPIC so bear with me:

It was a recent story in the Mountain Eagle paper and I'm trying to find it to link it here but this is a recap...A young man was recently arrested somewhere, I think around Somerset or London maybe, using a Whitesburg police officers badge in a scam. He and 2 other people were dressing up in full tactical gear like police use in drug raids and " busting " local drug dealers for their drugs. These 3 guys ranged in age from like 17 - 21 or something and this is one of the more crazy stories I'd read lately.

Then there is a recent story about a UNITE drug counselor being busted herself for involvement in a huge Prescription Drug package pick up bust too.

http://www.themountaineagle.com/news/2011-10-...
Citizen

Pikeville, KY

#7 Oct 26, 2011
There's probably more people connected to the drug problem than we'd like to know about. It's a serious problem that needs to be met with swift and serious consequences. It should'nt take a 6 month investigation to prove guilt in this matter.

“DECIMATOR OF KNIGHTS”

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#8 Oct 26, 2011
Citizen wrote:
There's probably more people connected to the drug problem than we'd like to know about. It's a serious problem that needs to be met with swift and serious consequences. It should'nt take a 6 month investigation to prove guilt in this matter.
But that's just it, our public officials are even benefiting from the
illegal drug trade at some level or another, bet on it. If they are
not directly involved somehow then they're skimming funds from programs / grants or something, somewhere.
WYMT news

Pikeville, KY

#9 Oct 26, 2011
We all want drug dealers removed from our community, but there might be more of this happening if law enforcement weren't very careful:
http://www.drugwarrant.com/articles/drug-war-...
for sure

Pikeville, KY

#10 Oct 26, 2011
THE LEGEND HIMSELF wrote:
<quoted text>
But that's just it, our public officials are even benefiting from the
illegal drug trade at some level or another, bet on it. If they are
not directly involved somehow then they're skimming funds from programs / grants or something, somewhere.
Well, all the lawyers here are getting benefits from all the drug activity.

“DECIMATOR OF KNIGHTS”

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#11 Oct 26, 2011
for sure wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, all the lawyers here are getting benefits from all the drug activity.
Yes they are, without a doubt. The whole system is benefiting from dope and dope dealing and they're not going to bite the hand that feeds. Sure, they'll make some piddly little arrests of meaningless
nobodies selling a pill or some crap but the REAL dealers, the ones that supply entire geographical locations, will not be messed with.

CMN

Since: Mar 11

Location hidden

#12 Oct 27, 2011
All the above reasons make a good case for the legalization, or at least the decriminalization of drugs. The number of addicts may not diminish (I think many would) but the crime rates would drop significantly. The majority of crimes committed in this country are drug related. By taking the criminality out of drug use, no one would be able to make big bucks or have the incentive to go into the drug business. The ONLY thing Ron Paul is right about.
still wondering

Pikeville, KY

#13 Oct 27, 2011
CMN wrote:
All the above reasons make a good case for the legalization, or at least the decriminalization of drugs. The number of addicts may not diminish (I think many would) but the crime rates would drop significantly. The majority of crimes committed in this country are drug related. By taking the criminality out of drug use, no one would be able to make big bucks or have the incentive to go into the drug business. The ONLY thing Ron Paul is right about.
I never thought that I would support that idea; but I am beginning to think that there are positives to that thought. It could be made the same as alchohol; that is, if you are driving or in public intoxicated then you can be arrested. We cannot protect people from themselves. If they want to drink or use other drugs they are going to do so whether it is legal or not.
Citizen

Pikeville, KY

#14 Oct 27, 2011
I agree that money is the driving force behind it. The maker of oxycontin (Purdue Pharma) is raking in the cash. As long as the profits keep coming in, they could probably care less of the misuse of their drug.
runtz

Bowling Green, KY

#15 Oct 27, 2011
THE LEGEND HIMSELF wrote:
<quoted text>But that's just it, our public officials are even benefiting from the
illegal drug trade at some level or another, bet on it. If they are
not directly involved somehow then they're skimming funds from programs / grants or something, somewhere.
How do you figure? Any proof whatsoever?
runtz

Bowling Green, KY

#16 Oct 27, 2011
CMN wrote:
All the above reasons make a good case for the legalization, or at least the decriminalization of drugs. The number of addicts may not diminish (I think many would) but the crime rates would drop significantly. The majority of crimes committed in this country are drug related. By taking the criminality out of drug use, no one would be able to make big bucks or have the incentive to go into the drug business. The ONLY thing Ron Paul is right about.
Drug related yes, most people that commit crimes are on drugs. Why would you want it decriminalized????? More drugs=more crimes.
Sam Hall

Winchester, KY

#17 Oct 27, 2011
Patrick has first hand knowledge in this area, he was busted for selling and spent time. It's all in the Jenkins forums with him being accused of ratting out others. Even describes how he was involved with an elderly woman that worked in the Judges office and how he used her to pass the drug tests by Parole Officers.
Sam Hall

Winchester, KY

#18 Oct 27, 2011
runtz wrote:
<quoted text>
Drug related yes, most people that commit crimes are on drugs. Why would you want it decriminalized????? More drugs=more crimes.
They were suggesting the crimes committed are to obtain more drugs. By making it easier for them to obtain they wouldn't need to commit these crimes but I have to disagree too. Blown out of their heads they would commit other kinds of crimes instead of just theft and robbery. These people won't or cant work in their condition so would still have to steal or rob just to buy them over the counter. Nothing short of incarceration seems to help, and then only forces them to be clean while on the inside. They pick right back up where they left off before being locked up. Our legal system might not be perfect but it is better then nothing.
Berry Girl

Hoboken, NJ

#19 Oct 27, 2011
Citizen wrote:
I've read many stories locally about busting drug dealers and most of them mention that the person/people arrested were under surveillance for months. Why don't they make an arrest when they witness the first deal?
From what my lawyer sister tells me: "Time is needed to prove a conspiracy; an intentional continuation of illegal activity by one or more individuals. This also will preclude the accused from being able to plea bargin, meaning if one incident of taped dug sell is used to obtain a felony conviction then the lawyer for the accused could plea the charges down to a misdemeanor resulting in nothing more then a slap on the wrist and a walk for the accused (fine, probation with some community service). However, with lengthy recorded surveillance, prosecutors can prove deliberate conspiracy and bag the accused for a felony. No matter how low the defendents lawyer plea bargins, a conspiracy charge remains a felony. Hope this helps, honey.
runtz

Bowling Green, KY

#20 Oct 27, 2011
Sam Hall wrote:
<quoted text>They were suggesting the crimes committed are to obtain more drugs. By making it easier for them to obtain they wouldn't need to commit these crimes but I have to disagree too. Blown out of their heads they would commit other kinds of crimes instead of just theft and robbery. These people won't or cant work in their condition so would still have to steal or rob just to buy them over the counter. Nothing short of incarceration seems to help, and then only forces them to be clean while on the inside. They pick right back up where they left off before being locked up. Our legal system might not be perfect but it is better then nothing.
I concur

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 2
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Pikeville Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Word Association (Aug '11) 48 min MUSICK-NESS 5,324
Add a word, Drop a word (May '10) 51 min MUSICK-NESS 21,903
Bible study rules for public schools proposed (Feb '10) 57 min spaceship 131,447
What's mitch McConnell done for coal, when ther... 1 hr haha 17,533
Josh Huffman new Pikecille Commussioner 1 hr tax payer 35
Smile (Apr '14) 2 hr Bunny Rabbitt 215
Don Blankenship 3 hr wonderky 51
women sleeping with married men 13 hr lab coat 36
FBI Comes To Pike Wed enter user name 93
Pikeville Dating
Find my Match

Pikeville People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Pikeville News, Events & Info

Click for news, events and info in Pikeville

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]

NFL Latest News

Updated 11:56 am PST

Bleacher Report11:56AM
Why Is Bengals' Pass Rush Struggling so Much?
NBC Sports12:05 PM
Rookie Hill gives Bengals much-needed boost - NBC Sports
NFL 5:08 AM
Jeremy Hill 'deserves' touches as Bernard eases back
Bleacher Report 9:02 AM
Does Cam Need Protection or Weapons More in 2015 Draft?
Bleacher Report10:02 AM
Grading Carolina's Positional Units Heading into Bye Week