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found it interesting

Elkhorn City, KY

#1 Mar 6, 2011
These new drug laws have been passed and are now in effect. What do you think ?http://www.kentucky.com/2011/ 01/19/1602619/kentucky-drug-la ws-would-change.html
found it interesting

Elkhorn City, KY

#2 Mar 6, 2011
found it interesting

Elkhorn City, KY

#3 Mar 6, 2011
That link doesn't work either,Anyway you can go to ky.com and look it up.Hopefully somebody who knows how will put a link to the page!lol i tried.
wondering

Pikeville, KY

#4 Mar 6, 2011
found it interesting wrote:
These new drug laws have been passed and are now in effect. What do you think ?http://www.kentucky.com/2011/ 01/19/1602619/kentucky-drug-la ws-would-change.html
What are you referring to? I couldn't find anything new except a redefinition of who is a certified drug and alcohol counselor.
wondering

Pikeville, KY

#5 Mar 6, 2011
I did a google search and found this. I guess this is what you are talking about?

http://www.kentucky.com/2011/02/16/1636753/ke...

I have to agree that locking people up for drug misuse isn't taking care of the problem.
awake

Harold, KY

#6 Mar 6, 2011
Proof that the courts are not there for justice it is all about the money (CFR Code of Federal Regulations)all the things i've been telling people are facts that you can find for yourself don't just take my word for it.

27 CFR 72.11 COMMERCIAL CRIMES: Any of the following types of crimes (FEDERAL OR STATE): Offenses against the revenue laws; burglary; counterfeiting; forgery; kidnapping; larceny; robbery; illegal sale or possession of deadly weapons; prostitution (including soliciting, procuring, pandering, white slaving, keeping house of ill fame, and like offenses); extortion; swindling and confidence games; and attempting to commit, conspiring to commit, or compounding any of the foregoing crimes. Addiction to narcotic drugs and use of marijuana will be treated as if such were commercial crime.
http://cfr.vlex.com/vid/72-11-meaning-terms-1...
nope

Whitesburg, KY

#7 Mar 6, 2011
wondering wrote:
I did a google search and found this. I guess this is what you are talking about?
http://www.kentucky.com/2011/02/16/1636753/ke...
I have to agree that locking people up for drug misuse isn't taking care of the problem.
but druggies arent going to change anyway. at least in prison they cant steal from people. just because a druggie is non violent dont mean he shouldnt be in prison.
awake

Harold, KY

#8 Mar 6, 2011
there are no more judges they are all Administrators over trust accounts. http://courts.ky.gov/aoc/

Administrative Procedures Act Kentucky
In Kentucky, Administrative Regulations are found in Title III, Chapter 13A and 13B of Kentucky Revised Statutes. As per KRS 13A.020, a permanent subcommittee of the legislative research commission called administrative regulation review subcommittee is created.
http://administrativelaw.uslegal.com/administ...

Federal Administrative Procedure Act
http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/courses/study_aids... not even your high priced attorney will tell you these things. we do not have court judges and haven't had them for years now.

“DECIMATOR OF KNIGHTS”

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#9 Mar 6, 2011
I read the Penal - related changes in those links and as always, I disagree with the mass incarceration of drug addicts that are non - offenders in any other criminal activity, only drug addicts convicted of possession or other drug - related offenses. Prison is not a viable 100% effectual deterrent in my opinion. For some, yes but not all. The only real way to combat and hopefully prevent repeat offenses is through awareness and education. Awareness / Education not only to the addict themselves but for society in general as well. Harsh treatment and the imprisoning of addicts does nothing to actually stop drug use and drug - related crimes, it must be addressed through forced sobriety if need be with stringent educational processes such as N.A. or other ways of learning how addiction works and one's ability to treat their problem. The other end of the stick is education, both of youth to hopefully prevent addiction as well as the addict
to understand their illness. Yes, I see addiction as an illness, the result of some other underlying issues in many cases and I personally do not feel just throwing them in prison, the over - crowding
of prisons with non - criminal, non - violent prisoners is any type of answer.
Money

Pikeville, KY

#10 Mar 6, 2011
If anyone ever gets serious about the drug problems. meth labs children blown up or exposed to all this. one drug. sodium penitential will take care of the problems. it also saves $ 50.000 a year for incarceration of each and ever one. THE LOVE OF MONEY WON'T LET THIS HAPPEN. ps. also we won't need to trade schools for more prisons.
tough

Whitesburg, KY

#11 Mar 6, 2011
THE LEGEND HIMSELF wrote:
I read the Penal - related changes in those links and as always, I disagree with the mass incarceration of drug addicts that are non - offenders in any other criminal activity, only drug addicts convicted of possession or other drug - related offenses. Prison is not a viable 100% effectual deterrent in my opinion. For some, yes but not all. The only real way to combat and hopefully prevent repeat offenses is through awareness and education. Awareness / Education not only to the addict themselves but for society in general as well. Harsh treatment and the imprisoning of addicts does nothing to actually stop drug use and drug - related crimes, it must be addressed through forced sobriety if need be with stringent educational processes such as N.A. or other ways of learning how addiction works and one's ability to treat their problem. The other end of the stick is education, both of youth to hopefully prevent addiction as well as the addict
to understand their illness. Yes, I see addiction as an illness, the result of some other underlying issues in many cases and I personally do not feel just throwing them in prison, the over - crowding
of prisons with non - criminal, non - violent prisoners is any type of answer.
This is tough. Many people arrested and convicted of drug possession offenses are committing other crimes such as burglary, forgery, theft, etc. I dont agree with locking up every drug offender. however some it helps. some it doesnt. some cant be helped and I hate to say that. Also if someone doesnt give up their druggie friends then its never gong to work. I also dont think suboxone and methadone is the answer. I believe drug court is helpful. But ever notice when someone is about ready to get indicted they run straight to rehab? Its like they are going through the motions. But drug sentencing isnt always fair either. its a tough situation in my view.

“DECIMATOR OF KNIGHTS”

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#12 Mar 6, 2011
tough wrote:
<quoted text>
This is tough. Many people arrested and convicted of drug possession offenses are committing other crimes such as burglary, forgery, theft, etc. I dont agree with locking up every drug offender. however some it helps. some it doesnt. some cant be helped and I hate to say that. Also if someone doesnt give up their druggie friends then its never gong to work. I also dont think suboxone and methadone is the answer. I believe drug court is helpful. But ever notice when someone is about ready to get indicted they run straight to rehab? Its like they are going through the motions. But drug sentencing isnt always fair either. its a tough situation in my view.
It is tough, true but let me clarify that I said drug offenders only needed alternative means than imprisonment in many cases. That said, if the addict is
engaged in other criminal acts, crimes, etc then their asses need
to be incarcerated. I draw the line at drug ONLY offenders, not criminals carrying out criminal offenses. I went through the gambit
with Methadone and Suboxone after developing my opiate addictions
with Oxycontin and while I think they can be advantageous with a
certain approach ( via short term, low dose means combined with drug / addiction education and awareness programs in unison ) they are NOT cures and / or miracle drugs as most users try supporting.
found it interesting

Elkhorn City, KY

#13 Mar 6, 2011
THE LEGEND HIMSELF wrote:
<quoted text>It is tough, true but let me clarify that I said drug offenders only needed alternative means than imprisonment in many cases. That said, if the addict is
engaged in other criminal acts, crimes, etc then their asses need
to be incarcerated. I draw the line at drug ONLY offenders, not criminals carrying out criminal offenses. I went through the gambit
with Methadone and Suboxone after developing my opiate addictions
with Oxycontin and while I think they can be advantageous with a
certain approach ( via short term, low dose means combined with drug / addiction education and awareness programs in unison ) they are NOT cures and / or miracle drugs as most users try supporting.
http://www.kentucky.com/2011/0 3/03/1656570/beshear-signs-cor rections-bill.html#storylink=m isearch
found it interesting

Elkhorn City, KY

#14 Mar 6, 2011
ig changes to Kentucky drug laws advance in legislature
By John Cheves jcheves@herald-leader.com
Posted: 12:00am on Feb 16, 2011; Modified: 11:20am on Feb 16, 2011

FRANKFORT The House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday night approved the most sweeping changes to Kentucky's penal code in a generation in an effort to reduce prison and jail crowding.

The committee voted unanimously to send House Bill 463 to the full House, where a floor vote is expected Thursday.

The result of much negotiation and compromise, the bill would steer many drug addicts into treatment and community supervision rather than prison. It drew praise from prosecutors, defense lawyers, judges and local leaders. The Kentucky Chamber of Commerce endorsed it, warning that the state's incarceration costs are draining resources that could better be spent on education.

The bill is based on recommendations by the Task Force on the Penal Code and Controlled Substances Act, which met throughout last year to address the state's exploding inmate population and the role played by drug crimes. Kentucky is being advised by the Pew Center on the States, which has helped organize similar reform legislation in Texas, South Carolina, Arizona and elsewhere.

One-fourth of Kentucky's nearly 21,000 prison inmates are serving time for drug offenses. The state is spending $460 million this year on its Corrections Department.

Among many changes, the bill would maintain existing penalties for people caught selling the largest amounts of drugs while reducing penalties for people caught selling lesser amounts. It would reduce penalties for drug possession often to misdemeanors and allow courts to send minor offenders to addiction treatment and place them on an appropriate level of community supervision.

Simply locking up everyone convicted for drug offenses hasn't worked, House Judiciary Chairman John Tilley, D-Hopkinsville, told his colleagues. Since 2000, Kentucky's prison rate has grown by 45 percent, compared to 13 percent for the national average, with no reduction in the number of repeat offenders.

Kentucky needs to rethink who needs to be behind bars and who can be handled differently, said Tilley, the bill's sponsor.

Other changes include the development of "graduated sanctions" to use when possible to punish criminals who violate the terms of their probation or parole, rather than returning them to prison or jail for minor violations such as missing an appointment.

Also, any state legislator who filed a bill to establish a new crime or strengthen the penalty for an existing crime would have to identify a source of funding and list the cost in terms of housing or monitoring criminals.

Legislative aides estimate the bill would save Kentucky about $42 million a year, although much of that would be reinvested in addiction treatment and community supervision.

A $147 million net savings over 10 years is possible, Tilley said.

One possible complication arose minutes before the vote Tuesday when Rep. Brent Yonts, D-Greenville, added an amendment to address jail inmates taken to local hospitals for medical treatment.

Yonts said he wants to stop "prisoner dumping," in which jails temporarily release a destitute inmate to the hospital for treatment and then put him back behind bars, leaving the hospital with the bills. His amendment would require jails to provide guards at the hospital to watch inmates getting treatment, and it would hold the jails responsible for reimbursing the hospitals at Medicaid rates.

Some local government leaders cited cost as they objected to the proposal, which was supported at Tuesday's hearing by the Kentucky Hospital Association.

The Kentucky Supreme Court is preparing to issue a decision that will address Yonts' concerns, Tilley said.

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Read more: http://www.kentucky.com/2011/02/16/1636753/ke...
found it interesting

Elkhorn City, KY

#15 Mar 6, 2011
found it interesting wrote:
<quottext> http://www.ksignscorrectionsbill.ht ml#storylink=misearch
ig changes to Kentucky drug laws advance in legislature

FRANKFORT The House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday night approved the most sweeping changes to Kentucky's penal code in a generation in an effort to reduce prison and jail crowding.
The committee voted unanimously to send House Bill 463 to the full
The result of much negotiation and compromise, the bill would steer many drug addicts into treatment and community supervision rather than prison. It drew praise from prosecutors, defense lawyers, judges and local leaders. The Kentucky Chamber of Commerce endorsed it, warning that the state's incarceration costs are draining resources that could better be spent on education.
The bill is based on recommendations by the Task Force on the Penal Code and Controlled Substances Act, which met throughout last year to address the state's exploding inmate population and the role played by drug crimes. Kentucky is being advised by the Pew Center on the States, which has helped organize similar reform legislation in Texas, South Carolina, Arizona and elsewhere.
One-fourth of Kentucky's nearly 21,000 prison inmates are serving time for drug offenses. The state is spending $460 million this year on its Corrections Department.
Among many changes, the bill would maintain existing penalties for people caught selling the largest amounts of drugs while reducing penalties for people caught selling lesser amounts. It would reduce penalties for drug possession often to misdemeanors and allow courts to send minor offenders to addiction treatment and place them on an appropriate level of community supervision.
Simply locking up everyone convicted for drug offenses hasn't worked, House Judiciary Chairman John Tilley, D-Hopkinsville, told his colleagues. Since 2000, Kentucky's prison rate has grown by 45 percent, compared to 13 percent for the national average, with no reduction in the number of repeat offenders.
Kentucky needs to rethink who needs to be behind bars and who can be handled differently, said Tilley, the bill's sponsor.
Other changes include the development of "graduated sanctions" to use when possible to punish criminals who violate the terms of their probation or parole, rather than returning them to prison or jail for minor violations such as missing an appointment.
Also, any state legislator who filed a bill to establish a new crime or strengthen the penalty for an existing crime would have to identify a source of funding and list the cost in terms of housing or monitoring criminals.
Legislative aides estimate the bill would save Kentucky about $42 million a year, although much of that would be reinvested in addiction treatment and community supervision.
A $147 million net savings over 10 years is possible, Tilley said.
One possible complication arose minutes before the vote Tuesday when Rep. Brent Yonts, D-Greenville, added an amendment to address jail inmates taken to local hospitals for medical treatment.
Yonts said he wants to stop "prisoner dumping," in which jails temporarily release a destitute inmate to the hospital for treatment and then put him back behind bars, leaving the hospital with the bills. His amendment would require jails to provide guards at the hospital to watch inmates getting treatment, and it would hold the jails responsible for reimbursing the hospitals at Medicaid rates.
Some local government leaders cited cost as they objected to the proposal, which was supported at Tuesday's hearing by the Kentucky Hospital Association.
The Kentucky Supreme Court is preparing to issue a decision that will address Yonts' concerns, Tilley said.

Read more: http://www.kentucky.com/2011/02/16/1636753/ke...
tough

Richmond, KY

#16 Mar 6, 2011
THE LEGEND HIMSELF wrote:
<quoted text>It is tough, true but let me clarify that I said drug offenders only needed alternative means than imprisonment in many cases. That said, if the addict is
engaged in other criminal acts, crimes, etc then their asses need
to be incarcerated. I draw the line at drug ONLY offenders, not criminals carrying out criminal offenses. I went through the gambit
with Methadone and Suboxone after developing my opiate addictions
with Oxycontin and while I think they can be advantageous with a
certain approach ( via short term, low dose means combined with drug / addiction education and awareness programs in unison ) they are NOT cures and / or miracle drugs as most users try supporting.
Yea its hard to determine who is only a user and who is committing other crimes. We both know someone may get caught for possession but has committed other crimes and never been charged with. but first time drug offenders rarely get prison time. mostly drug court or probation. so i dont know if this new bill will change anything. do you know much about success on probation or drug court? i know a few its worked for and others it has not. I always listen to recovering addicts and how they managed to break the addiction cycle.
Average Joe

United States

#17 Mar 6, 2011
I could be wrong, but the way I understand this is that an offender arrested while under the influence of drugs will get treatment and possible probation, while the average Joe coming home from, say a New Year's party, gets arrested for DUI but still suffers the usual consequences.
OR
A person under the influence of drugs shoplifting from a business is offered treatment, when the average Joe(non-drug user)shoplifting the same item will likely face jail time, fine or both.
Now don't get me wrong, I don't condone any of these crimes, nor have I ever committed any of these, but I would think that Average Joe could smell something rotten here.
There are so many of these examples that I could come up with, but hopefully you get the idea.
Please correct me if I'm wrong, it won't be the first time.
awake

Harold, KY

#18 Mar 6, 2011
the government is out of control here is the only chance we have to stop it and return the power to we the people. click on history tab to find out how this happened and restored America tab to see what we are doing to stop it.
http://www.republicoftheunitedstates.org/
check it out and let me know what you think.
now

Monticello, AR

#19 Jun 10, 2011
Well will the law afect new cases or old and say you were indicted in 2007 and never been to trial untill 2012 would new law be used or old law funny.

PADUCAH A controversial new plan goes into effect Wednesday that promises to save the state hundreds of millions of dollars.

Under the new rules, people arrested on a number of misdemeanors, including minor drug charges, will no longer see the inside of a jail while they await trial. It also reduces jail time for people convicted of a number of non-violent felonies.

Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear said the new law will save the state $422 million over the next 10 years. But local law enforcement said it may cause more problems in the long run.

As an example, if someone gets caught with a small amount of marijuana, instead of sitting in jail waiting for a court appearance, all at taxpayer expense, if police think the suspect is not a danger to himself or herself, or others, he or she will get a citation, just like a traffic ticket.

The changes will help take care of the overcrowding issue at jails but it's the long-term effects law enforcement are concerned about.

Some local inmates are only accused of things like shoplifting, traffic violations and drug offenses but they're already serving time because they can't afford to post bail. But under a new Kentucky law, the suspects won't see a courtroom or the inside of a jail until after they're convicted.

"It's unbelievable the scope of what this new law has done and we're scrambling trying to get all our people trained," said Sheriff Jon Hayden.

Hayden and his team have worked for months to try to wrap their heads around the new law that mandates citations instead of handcuffs.

"If a person is selling Lortab and it's under a certain number of Lortabs, it's a misdemeanor," Hayden said. "It's no longer a felony and if it's a non-violent offense and you have no reason to believe the person will not appear in court, you have to cite them."

That allows the accused to go about their business until they're convicted.

"Undoubtedly, there is going to be more criminals on the streets than there ever was before, no question, and I don't think anybody can argue that," Hayden said.

But it will also save the state an estimated $400 million over the next 10 years and reduce overcrowding in our jails.

"If you're trying to accomplish reduction in overcrowding, saving money and reducing the prison population, it will accomplish those goals," said judge Chris Hollowell. "Now, if you're trying to lower recidivism rates, lower the crime rate, lower the rate of addiction, those questions are all open to debate. I think it has the potential to do that but we won't know. That's something that will have to be fleshed out as we go."

Hayden agreed, adding it's a new law that everyone will have to work at until it becomes second nature.

"It's some very complicated changes," Hayden said.

It's important to note that this new law doesn't change the possibility of jail time after conviction. Laws on domestic violence, child abuse or any sexual offenses have not changed.

Governor Beshear released a statement Tuesday on the new law. It reads, in part, "This aggressive effort modernizes our drug laws while reinvesting the savings in prison costs into drug treatment programs."

For more information on law, click here,
friend

Monticello, AR

#20 Jun 10, 2011
PADUCAH A controversial new plan goes into effect Wednesday that promises to save the state hundreds of millions of dollars.

Under the new rules, people arrested on a number of misdemeanors, including minor drug charges, will no longer see the inside of a jail while they await trial. It also reduces jail time for people convicted of a number of non-violent felonies.

Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear said the new law will save the state $422 million over the next 10 years. But local law enforcement said it may cause more problems in the long run.

As an example, if someone gets caught with a small amount of marijuana, instead of sitting in jail waiting for a court appearance, all at taxpayer expense, if police think the suspect is not a danger to himself or herself, or others, he or she will get a citation, just like a traffic ticket.

The changes will help take care of the overcrowding issue at jails but it's the long-term effects law enforcement are concerned about.

Some local inmates are only accused of things like shoplifting, traffic violations and drug offenses but they're already serving time because they can't afford to post bail. But under a new Kentucky law, the suspects won't see a courtroom or the inside of a jail until after they're convicted.

"It's unbelievable the scope of what this new law has done and we're scrambling trying to get all our people trained," said Sheriff Jon Hayden.

Hayden and his team have worked for months to try to wrap their heads around the new law that mandates citations instead of handcuffs.

"If a person is selling Lortab and it's under a certain number of Lortabs, it's a misdemeanor," Hayden said. "It's no longer a felony and if it's a non-violent offense and you have no reason to believe the person will not appear in court, you have to cite them."

That allows the accused to go about their business until they're convicted.

"Undoubtedly, there is going to be more criminals on the streets than there ever was before, no question, and I don't think anybody can argue that," Hayden said.

But it will also save the state an estimated $400 million over the next 10 years and reduce overcrowding in our jails.

"If you're trying to accomplish reduction in overcrowding, saving money and reducing the prison population, it will accomplish those goals," said judge Chris Hollowell. "Now, if you're trying to lower recidivism rates, lower the crime rate, lower the rate of addiction, those questions are all open to debate. I think it has the potential to do that but we won't know. That's something that will have to be fleshed out as we go."

Hayden agreed, adding it's a new law that everyone will have to work at until it becomes second nature.

"It's some very complicated changes," Hayden said.

It's important to note that this new law doesn't change the possibility of jail time after conviction. Laws on domestic violence, child abuse or any sexual offenses have not changed.

Governor Beshear released a statement Tuesday on the new law. It reads, in part, "This aggressive effort modernizes our drug laws while reinvesting the savings in prison costs into drug treatment programs."

For more information on law, click here,

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