Drug raids result in arrest of seven

Drug raids result in arrest of seven

There are 148 comments on the The Ukiah Daily Journal story from Oct 17, 2008, titled Drug raids result in arrest of seven. In it, The Ukiah Daily Journal reports that:

At locations in Ukiah, Boonville and Philo, Mendocino Major Crimes Task Force raids sent seven men and women to jail and put a 1-year-old and 3-year-old children into the hands of Child Protective Services this ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Ukiah Daily Journal.

First Prev
of 8
Next Last
Watcher

United States

#141 Nov 4, 2008
Watcher wrote:
a study released not more than a month ago states that pot smoking DOES NOT CAUSE CANCER<IN FACT STUDIES HAVE SHOWN A REDUCTION IN TUMORS IN MICE TREATED WITH CANNABIS!IF POT CAUSED CANCER YOU WOULD HAVE NO ONE TO ACCUSE OF LIES!WE'D ALL BE DEAD!!!
Cannabis smoke 'has more toxins
BBC 20071219

Cannabis is the most commonly used illegal drug

Inhaled cannabis smoke has more harmful toxins than tobacco, scientists have discovered. The Canadian government research found 20 times as much ammonia, a chemical linked to cancer, New Scientist said. The Health Canada team also found five times as much hydrogen cyanide and nitrogen oxides, which are linked to heart and lung damage respectively. But tobacco smoke contained more of a toxin linked to infertility. Experts said users must be aware of the risks.

About a quarter of the population in the UK smokes tobacco products, while a sixth of 15 to 34-year-olds have tried cannabis in the past year, making it the most commonly used drug. The confirmation of the presence of known carcinogens and other chemicals implicated is important information for public health

David Moir, lead researcher

Previous research has shown cannabis smoke is more harmful to lungs than tobacco as it is inhaled more deeply and held in the lungs for a longer period. However, it has also been acknowledged that the average tobacco user smokes more than a cannabis user.

Researchers from Health Canada, the government's health research department, used a smoking machine to analyse the composition of the inhaled smoke for nearly 20 harmful chemicals. They also looked at the sidestream smoke, given off from the burning tip of the product and responsible for 85% of the smoked inhaled through passive smoking.

Concentrations

In most cases, the comparison on sidestream smoke broadly mirrored that of inhaled smoke. However, in the case of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the toxin linked to infertility, the researchers found concentrations were actually higher in cigarette smoke. The study also showed little difference in the concentrations of a range of chemicals, including chromium, nickel, arsenic and selenium. Lead researcher David Moir said: "The consumption of marijuana through smoking remains a reality and among the young seems to be increasing.

"The confirmation of the presence of known carcinogens and other chemical is important information for public health." Dr Richard Russell, a specialist at the Windsor Chest Clinic, said: "The health impact of cannabis is often over-looked amid the legal debate.

"Evidence shows it is multiplied when it is cannabis compared to tobacco. "Tobacco from manufacturers has been enhanced and cleaned whereas cannabis is relatively unprocessed and therefore is a much dirtier product. "These findings do not surprise me. The toxins from cannabis smoke cause lung inflammation, lung damage and cancer."

Stephen Spiro, of the British Lung Foundation, added the findings were "a great worry".

Since: Oct 08

Newark, NJ

#142 Nov 4, 2008
Subject: Marijuana Safer than Tobacco - Medical Post, Sept./94
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Date: Sun, 25 Jun 1995 17:15:10 GMT
Marijuana Less Harmful to Lungs
than Cigarettes
by Louise Gagnon
Medical Post, Sept. 6 1994
L'ESTEREL, Quebec -- Heavy marijuana smokers show less evidence
of lung injury than heavy tobacco smokers, and it may be
cannabinoids that are protecting them from developing a condition
like emphysema.
That's according to the principal investigator of a study done at
the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA).
Speaking at the third annual meeting of the International
Cannabis Research Society here, Dr. Donald Tashkin, a
pulmonologist and UCLA professor of medicine, concluded heavy
marijuana use did not cause the same degree of lung injury as
tobacco smoke.
"My own feeling is that marijuana smokers probably will not
develop emphysema as a consequence of smoking marijuana," he
said, but cautioned that does not rule out the development of
other conditions like respiratory carcinoma.
"It may be that the THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) in
marijuana could have different effects on inflammatory cells,
which may mediate injury in the lung."
His study, which aimed to measure the pulmonary effects of
habitual marijuana use, followed nine tobacco smokers, 10
marijuana smokers, 10 nonsmokers and four smokers of both
marijuana and tobacco. He gave both quantitative and qualitative
explanations for his finding.
Marijuana users in the study smoked three or four joints daily
for 15 years on average, while tobacco smokers in the study
smoked 25 cigarettes daily over a period of 20 years, indicating
a marked difference in exposure to smoke.
"There is a seven-fold difference in the amount of smoke to which
marijuana and tobacco smokers are exposed," he said.
"It's the quantitative difference in smoke exposure that might
explain the difference in the degree of lung injury as assessed
by these physiologic indices."

continued below.....

Since: Oct 08

Newark, NJ

#143 Nov 4, 2008
continued from above....

Moreover, the phagocytes gathered from the lungs of marijuana
smokers do not have the same properties as those gathered from
the lungs of tobacco smokers.
"We have previously shown that the macrophages that are harvested
from the rinse-out of the lungs of marijuana smokers seem not to
be activated," he said. "They do not release toxic oxygen
species, either under basal conditions or under stimulated
conditions nearly to the extent that tobacco macrophages do. If
anything, basal secretion of superoxide seems to be reduced in
the marijuana smokers."
Dr. Tashkin measured the clearance of the molecule diethylene
triamine penta-acetate (DTPA) from the lung, believed to be a
more sensitive indicator of lung injury than measuring the lung's
diffusing capacity.
If DTPA clearance is accelerated, then it implies an increase in
the leakiness of the alveolar epithelial membrane, which implies
injury to the membrane, he said.
Dr. Tashkin noted DTPA clearance is accelerated in tobacco smoke-
related lung injury.
Initially, the chronic effects of marijuana smoke were measured
in comparison to those of tobacco smoke: DTPA clearance was
measured at about 12 hours after the last marijuana or tobacco
cigarette smoked.
To determine the acute effects of marijuana and tobacco smoking,
Dr. Tashkin restudied these smokers a week or two later, giving
them a single joint of marijuana or a single tobacco cigarette or
both, and then measuring DTPA clearance 15 minutes subsequently.
"What we found was the clearance of DTPA was abnormally rapid
from the lung in the tobacco smokers," he said. "It was about
twice the rate of non-smokers. In the marijuana smokers, there
was a tendency toward a much less rapid rate of clearance. There
was no acute effect in either tobacco or marijuana, and there was
no added effect of marijuana or tobacco."
As with the lungs to tobacco smokers, when the lungs of marijuana
smokers are "washed out", a marked increase in the number of
alveolar macrophages is witnessed.
But whereas tobacco smoke has a concomitant effect of activating
the macrophages, leading to the subsequent release of certain
toxic substances, marijuana smoke fails to activate the
macrophages, Dr. Tashkin said. He noted this difference could be
attributed to differential regulation of cytokins.
"It may be that the macrophages from marijuana smokers release
certain suppressive cytokins, like transforming growth factor-
beta, which is known to suppress the inflammatory activity of
nearly all of the site populations," he said. "That's our
hypothesis, which we are currently exploring."

Since: Oct 08

Newark, NJ

#144 Nov 4, 2008
what the hay...what I posted above this disappeared....

Moreover, the phagocytes gathered from the lungs of marijuana
smokers do not have the same properties as those gathered from
the lungs of tobacco smokers.
"We have previously shown that the macrophages that are harvested
from the rinse-out of the lungs of marijuana smokers seem not to
be activated," he said. "They do not release toxic oxygen
species, either under basal conditions or under stimulated
conditions nearly to the extent that tobacco macrophages do. If
anything, basal secretion of superoxide seems to be reduced in
the marijuana smokers."
Dr. Tashkin measured the clearance of the molecule diethylene
triamine penta-acetate (DTPA) from the lung, believed to be a
more sensitive indicator of lung injury than measuring the lung's
diffusing capacity.
If DTPA clearance is accelerated, then it implies an increase in
the leakiness of the alveolar epithelial membrane, which implies
injury to the membrane, he said.
Dr. Tashkin noted DTPA clearance is accelerated in tobacco smoke-
related lung injury.
Initially, the chronic effects of marijuana smoke were measured
in comparison to those of tobacco smoke: DTPA clearance was
measured at about 12 hours after the last marijuana or tobacco
cigarette smoked.
To determine the acute effects of marijuana and tobacco smoking,
Dr. Tashkin restudied these smokers a week or two later, giving
them a single joint of marijuana or a single tobacco cigarette or
both, and then measuring DTPA clearance 15 minutes subsequently.
"What we found was the clearance of DTPA was abnormally rapid
from the lung in the tobacco smokers," he said. "It was about
twice the rate of non-smokers. In the marijuana smokers, there
was a tendency toward a much less rapid rate of clearance. There
was no acute effect in either tobacco or marijuana, and there was
no added effect of marijuana or tobacco."
As with the lungs to tobacco smokers, when the lungs of marijuana
smokers are "washed out", a marked increase in the number of
alveolar macrophages is witnessed.
But whereas tobacco smoke has a concomitant effect of activating
the macrophages, leading to the subsequent release of certain
toxic substances, marijuana smoke fails to activate the
macrophages, Dr. Tashkin said. He noted this difference could be
attributed to differential regulation of cytokins.
"It may be that the macrophages from marijuana smokers release
certain suppressive cytokins, like transforming growth factor-
beta, which is known to suppress the inflammatory activity of
nearly all of the site populations," he said. "That's our
hypothesis, which we are currently exploring."

Since: Oct 08

Newark, NJ

#145 Nov 4, 2008
Here's the first part again. You read this first and the above second...not sure why it did what it did...
Newsgroups: alt.hemp
From: Christopher Clay <[email protected]>
Subject: Marijuana Safer than Tobacco - Medical Post, Sept./94
Message-ID: <[email protected]>
Date: Sun, 25 Jun 1995 17:15:10 GMT

Marijuana Less Harmful to Lungs
than Cigarettes
by Louise Gagnon
Medical Post, Sept. 6 1994

L'ESTEREL, Quebec -- Heavy marijuana smokers show less evidence
of lung injury than heavy tobacco smokers, and it may be
cannabinoids that are protecting them from developing a condition
like emphysema.

That's according to the principal investigator of a study done at
the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA).

Speaking at the third annual meeting of the International
Cannabis Research Society here, Dr. Donald Tashkin, a
pulmonologist and UCLA professor of medicine, concluded heavy
marijuana use did not cause the same degree of lung injury as
tobacco smoke.

"My own feeling is that marijuana smokers probably will not
develop emphysema as a consequence of smoking marijuana," he
said, but cautioned that does not rule out the development of
other conditions like respiratory carcinoma.

"It may be that the THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) in
marijuana could have different effects on inflammatory cells,
which may mediate injury in the lung."

His study, which aimed to measure the pulmonary effects of
habitual marijuana use, followed nine tobacco smokers, 10
marijuana smokers, 10 nonsmokers and four smokers of both
marijuana and tobacco. He gave both quantitative and qualitative
explanations for his finding.

Marijuana users in the study smoked three or four joints daily
for 15 years on average, while tobacco smokers in the study
smoked 25 cigarettes daily over a period of 20 years, indicating
a marked difference in exposure to smoke.

"There is a seven-fold difference in the amount of smoke to which
marijuana and tobacco smokers are exposed," he said.

"It's the quantitative difference in smoke exposure that might
explain the difference in the degree of lung injury as assessed
by these physiologic indices."

Since: Oct 08

Newark, NJ

#146 Nov 4, 2008
Moreover, the phagocytes gathered from the lungs of marijuana
smokers do not have the same properties as those gathered from
the lungs of tobacco smokers.

"We have previously shown that the macrophages that are harvested
from the rinse-out of the lungs of marijuana smokers seem not to
be activated," he said. "They do not release toxic oxygen
species, either under basal conditions or under stimulated
conditions nearly to the extent that tobacco macrophages do. If
anything, basal secretion of superoxide seems to be reduced in
the marijuana smokers."

Dr. Tashkin measured the clearance of the molecule diethylene
triamine penta-acetate (DTPA) from the lung, believed to be a
more sensitive indicator of lung injury than measuring the lung's
diffusing capacity.

If DTPA clearance is accelerated, then it implies an increase in
the leakiness of the alveolar epithelial membrane, which implies
injury to the membrane, he said.

Dr. Tashkin noted DTPA clearance is accelerated in tobacco smoke-
related lung injury.

Initially, the chronic effects of marijuana smoke were measured
in comparison to those of tobacco smoke: DTPA clearance was
measured at about 12 hours after the last marijuana or tobacco
cigarette smoked.

To determine the acute effects of marijuana and tobacco smoking,
Dr. Tashkin restudied these smokers a week or two later, giving
them a single joint of marijuana or a single tobacco cigarette or
both, and then measuring DTPA clearance 15 minutes subsequently.



"What we found was the clearance of DTPA was abnormally rapid
from the lung in the tobacco smokers," he said. "It was about
twice the rate of non-smokers. In the marijuana smokers, there
was a tendency toward a much less rapid rate of clearance. There
was no acute effect in either tobacco or marijuana, and there was
no added effect of marijuana or tobacco."

As with the lungs to tobacco smokers, when the lungs of marijuana
smokers are "washed out", a marked increase in the number of
alveolar macrophages is witnessed.

But whereas tobacco smoke has a concomitant effect of activating
the macrophages, leading to the subsequent release of certain
toxic substances, marijuana smoke fails to activate the
macrophages, Dr. Tashkin said. He noted this difference could be
attributed to differential regulation of cytokins.

"It may be that the macrophages from marijuana smokers release
certain suppressive cytokins, like transforming growth factor-
beta, which is known to suppress the inflammatory activity of
nearly all of the site populations," he said. "That's our
hypothesis, which we are currently exploring."

I seemed to have made a mess of this entire posting. It should be understood that for every government sponsored anti cannabis post that watcher from piercy or forestville or where ever he's from posts I can post a study done by a independent non biased group. Most done by universities. It takes some searching but only because the government has made trying to complete studies and experiments a almost impossible task or those they don't agree with. this makes it extremely easy for watcher though.
Watcher

Hayward, CA

#147 Nov 4, 2008
Thank you minister!
Watcher

Hayward, CA

#148 Nov 4, 2008
It's a sad state of affairs when scientific facts become obscured by politics!

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 8
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Philo Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Austerity, Isolation are New Standards 7 hr Rump Itchy 1
Stop All International Travel; Austerity Next Wed trumplette with rash 1
Deportation to Panama On Hold Wed the fear tator 4
Trump to Buy England & Euro Wed Stoo Bedassoh 1
It's Bye Bye Bernie Tue Carl Lafong 2
Invade Europe? Tue Picasshol 2
Trump to Fight Euro? Jun 27 Yuknuf Council Burp 1

Philo Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Philo Mortgages