School project critics emerge

School project critics emerge

There are 13 comments on the Baltimore Sun story from May 20, 2008, titled School project critics emerge. In it, Baltimore Sun reports that:

Some Baltimore County legislators and Towson residents are urging state officials tomorrow to reject a nearly $4 million proposal to help expand Loch Raven High School, calling it a "haphazard project" and ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Baltimore Sun.

Libglib

Abingdon, MD

#1 May 20, 2008
This area needs a NEW high school, not another expansion. Even after the Loch Raven project is done, one or more of these high schools will still be overcapacity, and that does not include the effects of BRAC on the White Marsh/Perry Hall/Middle River area.
sun reader

Westminster, MD

#2 May 20, 2008
more schools, more teachers, more staff, more money. where is it all going to come from. how about tax relief for the taxpayer? why is that never spoken about?
Fed up in Towson

Cockeysville, MD

#3 May 20, 2008
Score another point for Senator Brochin. He was right when he opposed the special session taxes and he's right in opposing the expansion of LHS. My votes on the issues tend to align with the Republican ticket but Jim Brochin will be getting my vote!
Start Building NOW

Baltimore, MD

#4 May 20, 2008
I am fed up with my tax dollars going to every where but where I live. I have three children in Loch Raven and we need this addition in the Towson/Loch Raven area. Towson high and Loch Raven are busting at the seams. A new school would be fine but we need to elevate the overcrowding in these two schools NOW!!!
Start Building NOW

Baltimore, MD

#5 May 20, 2008
Libglib wrote:
This area needs a NEW high school, not another expansion. Even after the Loch Raven project is done, one or more of these high schools will still be overcapacity, and that does not include the effects of BRAC on the White Marsh/Perry Hall/Middle River area.
BARC will not effect Baltimore County so stop using that as an argument. Most individuals moving into the area will choose Harford and Cecil Counties for the more affordable housing in those areas.

A High School on the East side of Baltimore County will not elevate the crowding in the Towson/Loch raven area.
New Orleans Lex

Labadieville, LA

#6 May 20, 2008
How big is the Rock Church across the street ? And isnt the larger issue here development and not the children ? I mean, this unamed county executive who proposed this whole thing is obviously at odds with those who want sticter zoning in the cromwell valley. Why would a 400 seet addition be allowed if general development was not. Baltimore County government / elected officials must come to Louisiana to learn how to be corrupt. Since they control more money then Baltimore City govt., they're dirtier. Maryland is one of the richest states in the country. She should not support career politicians, they're always pondscum.
Steve

Pasadena, MD

#7 May 20, 2008
So Loch Raven is one of the smallest high schools in the county at about 1100 students, and with its current boundaries its enrollment is projected to decrease over the coming years. Towson has 1500 students, and Perry Hall has 2300, both at about 200 students over capacity. Would it really make sense to acquire the land and build an entire new school to handle a 400 (present) to 600 (future) student overflow? Do we really want to spend that many more of everyone's tax dollars? It absolutely makes the most sense to expand the smallest existing school, thoughtfully and with lots of community input.
bryanintimonium

Stevenson, MD

#8 May 20, 2008
I think what everyone has missed is quoting a population growth study. What we are talking about is alleviating overcrowding - right now. Most college and university admissions offices will tell you that the class of 2010 (high school) will be the largest in American history and all research suggests that after 2-3 plateau years, the population will begin to decline. It makes no sense at all to build a brand new high school or really even to massively expand existing ones. Let's invest in the infrastructure of the current schools and bring them up to par with the rest of the area.
Hello All

San Jose, CA

#9 May 20, 2008
bryanintimonium wrote:
I think what everyone has missed is quoting a population growth study. What we are talking about is alleviating overcrowding - right now. Most college and university admissions offices will tell you that the class of 2010 (high school) will be the largest in American history and all research suggests that after 2-3 plateau years, the population will begin to decline. It makes no sense at all to build a brand new high school or really even to massively expand existing ones. Let's invest in the infrastructure of the current schools and bring them up to par with the rest of the area.
I disagree with your statement. Back when they were planning 695 in the early 1960's, they thought it would be able to handle the daily traffic with ease and that was based on area growth projections. Anyone who has driven the west side during rush hour knows what it needs to be doubled in size. The only way to tell is to see what happens in 2010 and beyond. The thinking that no action should be taken since the problem may not exist in 10 years is a cop out and does not help the curren situation. There is no way a teacher can effectively reach every student in classroom of 40 at the high school level.
J in Balto County

United States

#10 May 20, 2008
I've learned to never trust any "officials". I got involved in a project expanding a Balt Co. middle school to "alleviate" over crowding. It was not even a semester before they "rezoned" and brought kids from places that were not previously part of the zone, so even with a gorgeous new addition the school was immediately over crowded. My friends, stop the process now. You are better off with the over crowding because they do have a max. Plus give us tax payers a break. What is really needed but won't happen is to find ways to encourage people to live where there is already existing capacity.
Lou the Liberal

Baltimore, MD

#11 May 20, 2008
Hello All wrote:
<quoted text>
I disagree with your statement. Back when they were planning 695 in the early 1960's, they thought it would be able to handle the daily traffic with ease and that was based on area growth projections. Anyone who has driven the west side during rush hour knows what it needs to be doubled in size. The only way to tell is to see what happens in 2010 and beyond. The thinking that no action should be taken since the problem may not exist in 10 years is a cop out and does not help the curren situation. There is no way a teacher can effectively reach every student in classroom of 40 at the high school level.
Federal government population studies and projections exist. These should figure into any equation that expands schools. Funding should be thought out as to where the population will be in 5 to 10 years from now. It is easy to spend tax dollars if you have no accountability and are out of touch with the facts.
name not important

United States

#12 May 21, 2008
Lou the Liberal wrote:
<quoted text>Federal government population studies and projections exist. These should figure into any equation that expands schools. Funding should be thought out as to where the population will be in 5 to 10 years from now. It is easy to spend tax dollars if you have no accountability and are out of touch with the facts.
Lou, I agree that is how it should be. But how it is: the most rabid loudest minority will get their schools built if they have friends in the right places (meaning what legislators they have contributed to). In Balt co it has always been that Dulaney HS gets everything they want, and Hereford is not far behind. A few other schools get a scrap now and then, and then the rest can just scratch. It is all about influence. In this case Jim Smith has tried to be financially responsible. I predict this ends up with a new school. Probably with stuff that is not very necessary.
Libglib

Abingdon, MD

#13 May 24, 2008
Steve wrote:
Would it really make sense to acquire the land and build an entire new school to handle a 400 (present) to 600 (future) student overflow?
In a word, no. Perry Hall had that 600-student addition less than a decade ago, and it took all of two years to start getting the relocatables back. The Northeast and Central areas are projected to be overcrowded by more than 1,000 students within 10 years, and all Northeast schools except Overlea already have large additions.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Perry Hall Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Reputed 'Bloods' Gang Member Charged In Shooting (Mar '06) May 2 Zeke the Pinhead 453
News Hundreds show support for housing bill in Balti... Apr '16 Fitus T Bluster 1
Jolly Shows carnival returns to White Marsh Mal... Apr '16 montydad5000 1
News Abingdon Panera fundraiser for Sheriff's Office... Mar '16 PatFrance 1
News Man shot outside White Marsh restaurant Feb '16 Rain 2
News Table Talk - (Oct '07) Dec '15 The Truth 10
News Q&A with Baltimore County Councilman David Marks (Oct '15) Oct '15 Abigail 1
More from around the web

Personal Finance

Perry Hall Mortgages