Boy, 15, charged with pal's murder in...

Boy, 15, charged with pal's murder in botched robbery

There are 9 comments on the Boston Herald story from Apr 24, 2014, titled Boy, 15, charged with pal's murder in botched robbery. In it, Boston Herald reports that:

A 15-year-old from Lynn is being charged with the murder of his alleged partner in crime, after prosecutors say the victim in an armed robbery pulled his own gun and fatally shot one of the accomplices.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Boston Herald.

Justice

Boston, MA

#1 Apr 25, 2014
Lock him up and bury the key
Wishful Thinking

Beverly, MA

#2 Apr 26, 2014
Wish he could be locked up forever. Because he is 15, someone will fight for him to be treated as a juvenile. Because we all know that when a kid turns 21 he straightens right up and never returns to a dysfunctional life and no longer a threat to society, right?

Messed-up!

“HUNTING RIGHTS ADVOCATE”

Since: Oct 08

Boggy Creek

#3 Apr 26, 2014
Seems to me that charging him with murder when it was the victim who shot his partner is stretching the law beyond it's reach. Don't get me wrong, I'm not defending the little creep. His partner got what he deserved and this one should be locked up for an extended period. A charge of armed robbery and assault with the intent to kill sounds more reasonable. Prosecutors need to stop plea bargaining to lighten their case loads and start prosecuting punks like this to the fullest extent of the law instead of finding new and unwise ways of stretching the law. This squirrel isn't guilty of killing his partner but he is guilty of threatening the life of a citizen during the process of trying to rob him. In a sane world that should be enough to put him away for the next few decades.
Then what

Beverly, MA

#4 Apr 27, 2014
Squach wrote:
Seems to me that charging him with murder when it was the victim who shot his partner is stretching the law beyond it's reach. Don't get me wrong, I'm not defending the little creep. His partner got what he deserved and this one should be locked up for an extended period. A charge of armed robbery and assault with the intent to kill sounds more reasonable. Prosecutors need to stop plea bargaining to lighten their case loads and start prosecuting punks like this to the fullest extent of the law instead of finding new and unwise ways of stretching the law. This squirrel isn't guilty of killing his partner but he is guilty of threatening the life of a citizen during the process of trying to rob him. In a sane world that should be enough to put him away for the next few decades.
Good to know that you will have a job waiting for him and a place next door to you when he gets out.

“HUNTING RIGHTS ADVOCATE”

Since: Oct 08

Boggy Creek

#5 Apr 27, 2014
Then what wrote:
<quoted text>
Good to know that you will have a job waiting for him and a place next door to you when he gets out.
He'll either learn and stay out of trouble or he won't. No matter what he gets locked up for, sooner or later he will be released unless they execute him. If he abides by the law when he is released I don't care where he lives and works. If he chooses to continue a life of crime and violence I hope he ends up like his partner. Plain and simple.
Hiring Convicts

Beverly, MA

#6 Apr 28, 2014
Who hires convicts? Who hires convicted murderers? The point is once someone commits an offense like this, young or old, what kind of future is this person going to have? Even if it were possible to rehabilitate, who is going to hire him? If he is not employable, how is being destitute and homeless going to be better? And if he is not able to rehabilitate, why should we as a society endure the high risk of another victim? It would be nice to have a live and let live attitude, but when it comes to violent crimes, how can we be so "laid back" about releasing violent criminals? So far, the recidivism rate is pretty high. Why do we keep making these mistakes over and over again? Why do drug addicts get more time behind bars than rapists? Why does someone who wrote bad checks get any time at all when whole banking institutions do not get penalized hardly at all for their crooked dealings? The rule of law needs a serious make-over. Too many innocent folks are wrongly convicted, those that we know are violent actually have less than life sentences and non-violent offenders are locked up far longer than necessary.

“HUNTING RIGHTS ADVOCATE”

Since: Oct 08

Boggy Creek

#7 Apr 28, 2014
Hiring Convicts wrote:
Who hires convicts? Who hires convicted murderers? The point is once someone commits an offense like this, young or old, what kind of future is this person going to have? Even if it were possible to rehabilitate, who is going to hire him? If he is not employable, how is being destitute and homeless going to be better? And if he is not able to rehabilitate, why should we as a society endure the high risk of another victim? It would be nice to have a live and let live attitude, but when it comes to violent crimes, how can we be so "laid back" about releasing violent criminals? So far, the recidivism rate is pretty high. Why do we keep making these mistakes over and over again? Why do drug addicts get more time behind bars than rapists? Why does someone who wrote bad checks get any time at all when whole banking institutions do not get penalized hardly at all for their crooked dealings? The rule of law needs a serious make-over. Too many innocent folks are wrongly convicted, those that we know are violent actually have less than life sentences and non-violent offenders are locked up far longer than necessary.
Point taken. Our society does have an issue with rehabilitation. If someone commits a crime, no matter how serious, there needs to be a very clear point at which their debt to society is paid in full. I have hired convicts in the past and would do so again based on my assessment of the individual but I'm an exception to the rule. When an individual has paid their debt in full as imposed by a court of law that should be the end of it unless that individual commits another crime. The idea that an individual is branded for life by a conviction is self-defeating. If the judge means life he'll hand down a sentence of life. When an individual has paid in full and done everything mandated by the court all of the rights and freedoms of an American citizen should be restored to them, 100%. Denying this removes a great deal of the incentive to "go straight". While I believe in harsher sentences, especially for repeat offenders, I also believe that we must as a society consider the debt paid in full when those harsh sentences are fully served. There's no easy answer but I agree that if an individual comes out of prison with the intent of becoming a useful member of society.........our society has the deck stacked against him.
Trigger

Saint Paul, MN

#8 May 1, 2014
Squach wrote:
<quoted text>Point taken. Our society does have an issue with rehabilitation. If someone commits a crime, no matter how serious, there needs to be a very clear point at which their debt to society is paid in full. I have hired convicts in the past and would do so again based on my assessment of the individual but I'm an exception to the rule. When an individual has paid their debt in full as imposed by a court of law that should be the end of it unless that individual commits another crime. The idea that an individual is branded for life by a conviction is self-defeating. If the judge means life he'll hand down a sentence of life. When an individual has paid in full and done everything mandated by the court all of the rights and freedoms of an American citizen should be restored to them, 100%. Denying this removes a great deal of the incentive to "go straight". While I believe in harsher sentences, especially for repeat offenders, I also believe that we must as a society consider the debt paid in full when those harsh sentences are fully served. There's no easy answer but I agree that if an individual comes out of prison with the intent of becoming a useful member of society.........our society has the deck stacked against him.
They can always start their own company with no background check.
Lon Spector

Bay Shore, NY

#9 May 2, 2014
umh,I don't know how I'll be recieved on this thred
but I'd like to tell you a few things about myself:
My father was a federal agent, so we moved very
frequently.
Among the places I lived was Springfield Mass. It
was 1967/68. We lived in two sections of the city.
Now this was very long ago, so forgive me if I get
names wrong. My father worked at Westover
Airforce base.
The first part of Springfield was more clean and
modern. The grammer school I attended was first
rate. My neighborhood was O.K. I had trouble with
a little girl who hated me and gave away her brother's
cat to my family. She told her brother that I had stolen
the cat. The brother naturally hated me and wanted to
fight me. I didn't get it. All I wanted to do was to attend
school (Which I hated) and be left alone. So When 3pm
came I rushed home as quickly as I could.
That was the "Impossible Dream" year of 1967, The
Red Sox were in the series for the first time since 1946.
Michael Car was my neighbour. This was years before
he hit it big on radio. He didn't like me much.
We then moved to another section of Springfield. It was
a much poorer rundown section near the railroad
tracks. It was very industrial, not far from the
Springfield Auromy.
The first day I moved there I was warned about a family
of neighborhood toughs named the Lason family.
All the young kids were frightened of them. The adults
didn't notice them. They would walk the streets in
leather jackets-even the girls. To make a long story
short they made my life a misery. I dreaded running into
them,
But it wasn't only on the outside I was attacked. I
was attacked inside my house as well.
One night I shut off the light and two closet doors
swung wildly back and fourth, poundings rappings
scratchings etc... I was even slapped in the head and
my hair was pulled. That night I slept with the covers
over my head, and a plam print appeard over the
covers and worked it's way up. I didn't go to sleep
without covers for many years after that. Door knobs
turned. shadow people entered the room etc..
When we left that I house I was the happiest person
alive. The ghosts didn't follow.

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