Paris Towne Center
Curious

Paris, TX

#1 Jun 28, 2012
What shops are they building behind Burger King?
Prosecutor

Paris, TX

#2 Jun 29, 2012
Objection, your Honor! Asked and answered ad infinitum.

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#3 Jun 29, 2012
Prosecutor wrote:
Objection, your Honor! Asked and answered ad infinitum.
Asked and answered is a rookie lawyer objection. The correct term is objection, repetitive. Judges hate it when lawyers say asked and answered.
Prosecutor

Paris, TX

#4 Jun 29, 2012
Nobody Gets It wrote:
<quoted text>
Asked and answered is a rookie lawyer objection. The correct term is objection, repetitive. Judges hate it when lawyers say asked and answered.
Objection, your Honor. Assumes facts not in evidence.

From trial.laws.com : One of the objections which an attorney might make to a question raised by his or her opposing attorney within a trial is the objection of “asked and answered.” This objection would normally be raised after the opposing attorney asks a question which has already been answered in some capacity. Hence, the objection is called the “asked and answered” objection because the question being objected to has already been asked and answered.
House

Paris, TX

#5 Jun 29, 2012
Prosecutor wrote:
<quoted text>
Objection, your Honor. Assumes facts not in evidence.
From trial.laws.com : One of the objections which an attorney might make to a question raised by his or her opposing attorney within a trial is the objection of “asked and answered.” This objection would normally be raised after the opposing attorney asks a question which has already been answered in some capacity. Hence, the objection is called the “asked and answered” objection because the question being objected to has already been asked and answered.
What did you say?
I need a GED for this sh.it

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#6 Jun 29, 2012
Prosecutor wrote:
<quoted text>
Objection, your Honor. Assumes facts not in evidence.
From trial.laws.com : One of the objections which an attorney might make to a question raised by his or her opposing attorney within a trial is the objection of “asked and answered.” This objection would normally be raised after the opposing attorney asks a question which has already been answered in some capacity. Hence, the objection is called the “asked and answered” objection because the question being objected to has already been asked and answered.
I know what the objection is. I'm just saying that if you say "asked and answered," a judge is goign to look at you funny because it's old phrasing. Repetitive is the appropriate objection for that.
Prosecutor

Paris, TX

#7 Jun 29, 2012
House wrote:
<quoted text>
What did you say?
I need a GED for this sh.it
No, you need a fourth grade education.
Prosecutor

Paris, TX

#8 Jun 29, 2012
Nobody Gets It wrote:
<quoted text>
I know what the objection is. I'm just saying that if you say "asked and answered," a judge is goign to look at you funny because it's old phrasing. Repetitive is the appropriate objection for that.
You don't see many trials, do you? I happen to see a lot of them, and there aren't many where that objection doesn't come up.
The expert opinions

Paris, TX

#9 Jun 29, 2012
1) http://www.lawwebtv.com/videos/objections/obj... (an overview of the asked and answered objection ...odd, but he doesn't say anywhere that it's not worded properly).

2) "If you can't come up with a "tag" for the objection ( e.g., relevancy, asked and answered), then give your reasoning."

http://www.armycourtmartialdefense.info/2009/...

3) "Asked and answered
Def: The same question has already been asked and answered of this witness."
* This list of objections curiously does not include one with the label "repetitive."

http://www.docstoc.com/docs/25489495/Prof-Dav...

4)Asked and answered is actually one objection, not two, so that word group should always be "together" within commas if it fits. So if the atty says "Objection. Asked and answered," that's one objection. He is describing the objection.

http://www.readback.org/questions/8291/How-to... (This is a court reporter's website -- odd, but they don't mention that the judge looks funny everytime that one comes up.

And one more -- there are dozens more if you google it, but I'll stop with 5. I've looked at a bunch of them, and didn't find a single website that said "asked and answered" would get you laughed out of court.

5) In trial courts in the United States notice of an objection and the
grounds are usually given simultaneously. For example, counsel may say, still sitting,
"Objection: asked and answered", or, "Objection: hearsay".

http://www.ducharmefox.com/ContentFiles/Conte...
cash

Blossom, TX

#10 Jun 29, 2012
are we holding court at paris towne center
Eunice

Paris, TX

#11 Jun 29, 2012
cash wrote:
are we holding court at paris towne center
Maybe that's what's being built.

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