infamous hero
Friedrich Nietzsc

Paris, TX

#1 Feb 13, 2013
Christopher Dorner will now be in the ranks of the infamous. But in my opinion he is a hero in the cause he stood for. Even if his abstract idea of what his fight was about is unknown. After all what make a man stand up for what he believes in?
In every photo I saw of him in the news it is obvious that first and for most, the man was a solider. Little details have been revealed on what the object of his discontent with the LAPD was but never the less why would you simply marginalize an obviously talented warrior like this to obscurity.
Human beings in general are not in the habit of going off for the fun of it. There is always a manifestation of a perceived wrong that festers in the psyche. Obviously this man was committed to his career as a solider and warrior. Maybe little to overzealous, that all has of yet remains to be seen. But even this if directed properly could be an asset if the powers that be new how to employ this energy.
So he fought his last stand. This is not an anomaly as behavior is concerned. History is full of stories of last stands. Some are heroic and other are deemed villainous. Depends on whos writing the history books.
Mans morels are largely and abstraction that are developed through out time. So your judgment is largely a reflection of what you eternalize as you come up in the society around you.
Now a specific perception of mine that I have developed over the years is the rate at which law enforcement has armed themselves to the equality of the military. And now with all the talk of gun control the civilian population is slowly being neutered.
I mean think about it. The mentality of law enforcement is similar to that of criminals. Except they are on the opposite side of the fence. This of course, validates any and all actions by law enforcement committed in the name of the LAW! Including actions not taken. People who are labeled criminals for the smallest of crimes are relegated to that of bottom feeders of society in the minds of most including the justice system. For the justice system never forgives. You will always as a criminal will carry that scarlet letter.
Yes Mr. Dorner will be vilified for his action in keeping with the perception that the law is the last word. But I say kudos to a man that stood up for what he believes in. and his particular story will probably never be known to the citizenry in an effort to give NO credence to his actions.
hayseed

Clarksville, TX

#2 Feb 13, 2013
Friedrich Nietzsc wrote:
Christopher Dorner will now be in the ranks of the infamous. But in my opinion he is a hero in the cause he stood for. Even if his abstract idea of what his fight was about is unknown. After all what make a man stand up for what he believes in?
In every photo I saw of him in the news it is obvious that first and for most, the man was a solider. Little details have been revealed on what the object of his discontent with the LAPD was but never the less why would you simply marginalize an obviously talented warrior like this to obscurity.
Human beings in general are not in the habit of going off for the fun of it. There is always a manifestation of a perceived wrong that festers in the psyche. Obviously this man was committed to his career as a solider and warrior. Maybe little to overzealous, that all has of yet remains to be seen. But even this if directed properly could be an asset if the powers that be new how to employ this energy.
So he fought his last stand. This is not an anomaly as behavior is concerned. History is full of stories of last stands. Some are heroic and other are deemed villainous. Depends on whos writing the history books.
Mans morels are largely and abstraction that are developed through out time. So your judgment is largely a reflection of what you eternalize as you come up in the society around you.
Now a specific perception of mine that I have developed over the years is the rate at which law enforcement has armed themselves to the equality of the military. And now with all the talk of gun control the civilian population is slowly being neutered.
I mean think about it. The mentality of law enforcement is similar to that of criminals. Except they are on the opposite side of the fence. This of course, validates any and all actions by law enforcement committed in the name of the LAW! Including actions not taken. People who are labeled criminals for the smallest of crimes are relegated to that of bottom feeders of society in the minds of most including the justice system. For the justice system never forgives. You will always as a criminal will carry that scarlet letter.
Yes Mr. Dorner will be vilified for his action in keeping with the perception that the law is the last word. But I say kudos to a man that stood up for what he believes in. and his particular story will probably never be known to the citizenry in an effort to give NO credence to his actions.
Heroes don't kill the daughter of the man they're mad at because they got fired. You're barking up a slick tree.
yeppers

Rockwall, TX

#3 Feb 13, 2013
Friedrich Nietzsc wrote:
Christopher Dorner will now be in the ranks of the infamous. But in my opinion he is a hero in the cause he stood for. Even if his abstract idea of what his fight was about is unknown. After all what make a man stand up for what he believes in?
In every photo I saw of him in the news it is obvious that first and for most, the man was a solider. Little details have been revealed on what the object of his discontent with the LAPD was but never the less why would you simply marginalize an obviously talented warrior like this to obscurity.
Human beings in general are not in the habit of going off for the fun of it. There is always a manifestation of a perceived wrong that festers in the psyche. Obviously this man was committed to his career as a solider and warrior. Maybe little to overzealous, that all has of yet remains to be seen. But even this if directed properly could be an asset if the powers that be new how to employ this energy.
So he fought his last stand. This is not an anomaly as behavior is concerned. History is full of stories of last stands. Some are heroic and other are deemed villainous. Depends on who’s writing the history books.
Mans morels are largely and abstraction that are developed through out time. So your judgment is largely a reflection of what you eternalize as you come up in the society around you.
Now a specific perception of mine that I have developed over the years is the rate at which law enforcement has armed themselves to the equality of the military. And now with all the talk of gun control the civilian population is slowly being neutered.
I mean think about it. The mentality of law enforcement is similar to that of criminals. Except they are on the opposite side of the fence. This of course, validates any and all actions by law enforcement committed in the name of the LAW! Including actions not taken. People who are labeled criminals for the smallest of crimes are relegated to that of bottom feeders of society in the minds of most including the justice system. For the justice system never forgives. You will always as a criminal will carry that scarlet letter.
Yes Mr. Dorner will be vilified for his action in keeping with the perception that the law is the last word. But I say kudos to a man that stood up for what he believes in. and his particular story will probably never be known to the citizenry in an effort to give NO credence to his actions.
I agree!!! I think the LA PD WAS WRONG FROM THE BEGINNING!! He should have never been fired. Although I don't believe he should have killed anyone I do believe he is a HERO also.
Not really

United States

#4 Feb 13, 2013
Friedrich Nietzsc wrote:
Christopher Dorner will now be in the ranks of the infamous. But in my opinion he is a hero in the cause he stood for. Even if his abstract idea of what his fight was about is unknown. After all what make a man stand up for what he believes in?
In every photo I saw of him in the news it is obvious that first and for most, the man was a solider. Little details have been revealed on what the object of his discontent with the LAPD was but never the less why would you simply marginalize an obviously talented warrior like this to obscurity.
Human beings in general are not in the habit of going off for the fun of it. There is always a manifestation of a perceived wrong that festers in the psyche. Obviously this man was committed to his career as a solider and warrior. Maybe little to overzealous, that all has of yet remains to be seen. But even this if directed properly could be an asset if the powers that be new how to employ this energy.
So he fought his last stand. This is not an anomaly as behavior is concerned. History is full of stories of last stands. Some are heroic and other are deemed villainous. Depends on whos writing the history books.
Mans morels are largely and abstraction that are developed through out time. So your judgment is largely a reflection of what you eternalize as you come up in the society around you.
Now a specific perception of mine that I have developed over the years is the rate at which law enforcement has armed themselves to the equality of the military. And now with all the talk of gun control the civilian population is slowly being neutered.
I mean think about it. The mentality of law enforcement is similar to that of criminals. Except they are on the opposite side of the fence. This of course, validates any and all actions by law enforcement committed in the name of the LAW! Including actions not taken. People who are labeled criminals for the smallest of crimes are relegated to that of bottom feeders of society in the minds of most including the justice system. For the justice system never forgives. You will always as a criminal will carry that scarlet letter.
Yes Mr. Dorner will be vilified for his action in keeping with the perception that the law is the last word. But I say kudos to a man that stood up for what he believes in. and his particular story will probably never be known to the citizenry in an effort to give NO credence to his actions.
Talk about a whack job , may you be so lucky to encounter someone just like him who feels you have disrespected him
Too Bad

Arlington, TX

#6 Feb 13, 2013
He cannot be called a hero in any sense of the word. How heroic is it to kill innocent people? How heroic is it to terrorize a community?

I think he had the potential to be a hero in other ways, but, his mental illness ( yes - I do believe narcissism is a mental illness ) and anger was something he apparently couldn't control.
From what I have read he might have had some valid reasons for his anger . I do think some police officers have a tendency for anger and control issues. And I think a lot have really big egos and think they are some kind of god.

But, what Mr Dorner did was wrong, period.

I think eventually someone will make a sort of Dirty Harry type movie about it and portray him as a moralist who died to expose corruption in the LAPD.

( as if people don't already think there is corruption in most PD's.)
CBME

Paris, TX

#8 Feb 14, 2013
Friedrich Nietzsc wrote:
Christopher Dorner will now be in the ranks of the infamous. But in my opinion he is a hero in the cause he stood for. Even if his abstract idea of what his fight was about is unknown. After all what make a man stand up for what he believes in?
In every photo I saw of him in the news it is obvious that first and for most, the man was a solider. Little details have been revealed on what the object of his discontent with the LAPD was but never the less why would you simply marginalize an obviously talented warrior like this to obscurity.
Human beings in general are not in the habit of going off for the fun of it. There is always a manifestation of a perceived wrong that festers in the psyche. Obviously this man was committed to his career as a solider and warrior. Maybe little to overzealous, that all has of yet remains to be seen. But even this if directed properly could be an asset if the powers that be new how to employ this energy.
So he fought his last stand. This is not an anomaly as behavior is concerned. History is full of stories of last stands. Some are heroic and other are deemed villainous. Depends on whos writing the history books.
Mans morels are largely and abstraction that are developed through out time. So your judgment is largely a reflection of what you eternalize as you come up in the society around you.
Now a specific perception of mine that I have developed over the years is the rate at which law enforcement has armed themselves to the equality of the military. And now with all the talk of gun control the civilian population is slowly being neutered.
I mean think about it. The mentality of law enforcement is similar to that of criminals. Except they are on the opposite side of the fence. This of course, validates any and all actions by law enforcement committed in the name of the LAW! Including actions not taken. People who are labeled criminals for the smallest of crimes are relegated to that of bottom feeders of society in the minds of most including the justice system. For the justice system never forgives. You will always as a criminal will carry that scarlet letter.
Yes Mr. Dorner will be vilified for his action in keeping with the perception that the law is the last word. But I say kudos to a man that stood up for what he believes in. and his particular story will probably never be known to the citizenry in an effort to give NO credence to his actions.
UNBELIEVABLE! Let's all just go shoot everybody we don't agree with in the name of standing on our principles?????
CBME

Paris, TX

#9 Feb 14, 2013
yeppers wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree!!! I think the LA PD WAS WRONG FROM THE BEGINNING!! He should have never been fired. Although I don't believe he should have killed anyone I do believe he is a HERO also.
Why shouldn't he have been fired? Do you know details of his case the rest of us don't? You don't believe in killing anyone, but you believe him to be a hero? How can you separate the two?

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