Web MD and cyberstalking

Web MD and cyberstalking

Posted in the Paris Forum

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Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#1 Feb 24, 2013
Aug. 8, 2011 (Washington, D.C.)-- Due in large part to its 24/7, global presence, "cyberstalking" appears to cause its victims more stress and trauma than in-person stalking, according to a leading psychologist's observations.

"If you're harassed in school or at work, you can come home to a safe environment," says Elizabeth Carll, PhD, a psychologist in private practice in Long Island, N.Y.

"If you're cyberstalked, it can be all the time, no matter where you are," she tells WebMD. "Ironically, cyberstalking is not taken as seriously because it's seen as more removed, not real. In fact, it's worse."

Cyberstalking takes on many forms, Carll says. Among them: Installing spyware on a target's computer or via email; GPS (global positioning system) surveillance of the movement of victims; posting personal or false and humiliating information about the victim on the Internet; sending harassing emails and text message, and using social media such as Facebook or Twitter to post false and humiliating information.

Also, cyberbullyers may send viruses, spam attacks, and harmful programs to compromise or destroy the victim's computer, bully, and threaten a victim in chat rooms, Carll says. They may also use caller ID spoofing, Carll says. That's when the name of a person calling a victim shows up on caller ID as a favorite aunt, for example.

No well-designed studies comparing cyberstalking to real-world stalking have been conducted to date, Carll says. Recruiting people to participate is difficult, as most want to keep a low profile, she says.

Carll bases her conclusions on sessions with about 100 patients who have been cyberstalked in the last couple of years and thousands of victims of in-person harassment during her 25 years of practice.

Pamela Rutledge, PhD, director of the non-profit Media Psychology Research Center, tells WebMD that she's not convinced cyberstalking is worse than in-person stalking.

"Cyberstalking is a big issue right now. We pay attention to negative things, so it seems more prevalent.

"Anytime you're being harassed, it's stressful. You can lose site of the behavior if you worry about the tools. It may turn out harassment itself, not technology, is not the critical factor," she says.

Victims of Cyberstalking

In Carll's experience, victims of cyberstalking have a wide range of emotional reactions, including high levels of stress, anxiety, fear, and helplessness as well as nightmares, hypervigilance, undereating or overeating, and sleeping difficulties.

She spoke here at the American Psychological Association's (APA) annual convention. Carll is a member of the APA media psychology division.

U.S. Department of Justice statistics show that 3.4 million adults are victims of stalking and one in four, the majority female, have become the targets of cyberstalking, according to Carll.

She says that studies also show:
40% of women have experienced dating violence via social media, which can include harassing text messages and having disturbing information about them posted on social media sites.
20% of online stalkers use social networking to stalk their victims.
34% of female college students and 14% of male students have broken into a romantic partner's email.
Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#2 Feb 24, 2013
Interestingly, the same technologies used to cyber-harass can also be used to intervene and prevent harassment and violence, Carll says.

"A cell phone application that can tell you if someone threatening you is nearby could be lifesaving," she says.

"We also have to train people to protect themselves by using secure passwords," Carll says. "Never give your password to anyone else."

Also, some states are considering mandating the use of GPS tracking devices on offenders to allow victims to keep tabs on them, Carll says.

Additionally, new federal legislation that addresses all forms of technology used for harassment and stalking needs to be passed, she says.

These findings were presented at a medical conference. They should be considered preliminary as they have not yet undergone the "peer review" process, in which outside experts scrutinize the data prior to publication in a medical journal.
Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#3 Feb 24, 2013
http://www.webmd.com/balance/news/20110808/cy...

Aug. 8, 2011 (Washington, D.C.)-- Due in large part to its 24/7, global presence, "cyberstalking" appears to cause its victims more stress and trauma than in-person stalking, according to a leading psychologist's observations.

"If you're harassed in school or at work, you can come home to a safe environment," says Elizabeth Carll, PhD, a psychologist in private practice in Long Island, N.Y.

"If you're cyberstalked, it can be all the time, no matter where you are," she tells WebMD. "Ironically, cyberstalking is not taken as seriously because it's seen as more removed, not real. In fact, it's worse."

Cyberstalking takes on many forms, Carll says. Among them: Installing spyware on a target's computer or via email; GPS (global positioning system) surveillance of the movement of victims; posting personal or false and humiliating information about the victim on the Internet; sending harassing emails and text message, and using social media such as Facebook or Twitter to post false and humiliating information.

Also, cyberbullyers may send viruses, spam attacks, and harmful programs to compromise or destroy the victim's computer, bully, and threaten a victim in chat rooms, Carll says. They may also use caller ID spoofing, Carll says. That's when the name of a person calling a victim shows up on caller ID as a favorite aunt, for example.

No well-designed studies comparing cyberstalking to real-world stalking have been conducted to date, Carll says. Recruiting people to participate is difficult, as most want to keep a low profile, she says.

Carll bases her conclusions on sessions with about 100 patients who have been cyberstalked in the last couple of years and thousands of victims of in-person harassment during her 25 years of practice.

Pamela Rutledge, PhD, director of the non-profit Media Psychology Research Center, tells WebMD that she's not convinced cyberstalking is worse than in-person stalking.

"Cyberstalking is a big issue right now. We pay attention to negative things, so it seems more prevalent.

"Anytime you're being harassed, it's stressful. You can lose site of the behavior if you worry about the tools. It may turn out harassment itself, not technology, is not the critical factor," she says.

Victims of Cyberstalking

In Carll's experience, victims of cyberstalking have a wide range of emotional reactions, including high levels of stress, anxiety, fear, and helplessness as well as nightmares, hypervigilance, undereating or overeating, and sleeping difficulties.

She spoke here at the American Psychological Association's (APA) annual convention. Carll is a member of the APA media psychology division.

U.S. Department of Justice statistics show that 3.4 million adults are victims of stalking and one in four, the majority female, have become the targets of cyberstalking, according to Carll.

She says that studies also show:
40% of women have experienced dating violence via social media, which can include harassing text messages and having disturbing information about them posted on social media sites.
20% of online stalkers use social networking to stalk their victims.
34% of female college students and 14% of male students have broken into a romantic partner's email.
Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#4 Feb 24, 2013
What to Do About Cyberstalking
Interestingly, the same technologies used to cyber-harass can also be used to intervene and prevent harassment and violence, Carll says.
"A cell phone application that can tell you if someone threatening you is nearby could be lifesaving," she says.
"We also have to train people to protect themselves by using secure passwords," Carll says. "Never give your password to anyone else."
Also, some states are considering mandating the use of GPS tracking devices on offenders to allow victims to keep tabs on them, Carll says.
Additionally, new federal legislation that addresses all forms of technology used for harassment and stalking needs to be passed, she says.
These findings were presented at a medical conference. They should be considered preliminary as they have not yet undergone the "peer review" process, in which outside experts scrutinize the data prior to publication in a medical journal.
Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#5 Feb 24, 2013
Sorry my bad,2 & 4 are the same thing.
Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#6 Feb 24, 2013
Myths and answers wrote:
Sorry my bad,2 & 4 are the same thing.
You aren't me, but you are right.

The posts weren't showing up. So I posted them again.
Scoop

Paris, TX

#7 Feb 24, 2013
You both need help!
Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#8 Feb 24, 2013
No, you might though number 7.

I doubt you have the scoop on who needs help.
Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#9 Feb 24, 2013
Scoop wrote:
You both need help!
Why respond?

Why would you bother responding to a post?

What makes you think you are an expert related to this?

Educate yourself. Inform yourself, or not. It's your choice, but you have no idea what it is like.

If you want to know, why not post your information and I will give you a taste of it so that you can create for yourself an empathetic response instead of a judgmental one.
lol

Paris, TX

#10 Feb 24, 2013
Myths and answers wrote:
<quoted text>Why respond?
Why would you bother responding to a post?
What makes you think you are an expert related to this?
Educate yourself. Inform yourself, or not. It's your choice, but you have no idea what it is like.
If you want to know, why not post your information and I will give you a taste of it so that you can create for yourself an empathetic response instead of a judgmental one.
What makes you think you are an expert? So you are asking someone to post their private information on topix? Something you are blasting someone else for doing that supposedly to you? You are not right in the head.
Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#11 Feb 24, 2013
Myths and answers wrote:
No, you might though number 7.
I doubt you have the scoop on who needs help.
I doubt she does, with your continual disinformation and identity theft.

Creating confusion to create drama is your calling card. It's the calling card of psychopaths who try to get other people hurt.

Maybe someone will figure it all out if I stay on you like stink on crap.

I've tried ignoring. I've tried confrontation. I have tried everything. It's been 6 years now. You are just a scared little person trying to create fear with scare tactics, and humiliation and degradation.

It doesn't work with me.
Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#12 Feb 24, 2013
Various studies have identified that a sizeable proportion of stalkers (up to two thirds) will damage their victimís property (Blaauw et al., 2002) and this includes stalking engaged in by adolescents (McCann, 2000). Property damage may be associated with rage or frustration, revenge, a desire to harm something the victim cares about (i.e. destroying wedding photographs), a wish to undermine her belief in a safe environment (i.e. by cutting brake cables), as a form of threat, or it may be connected with breaking and entering the victimís property or spying on the victim. Property damage has been identified by researchers as preceding or co-occurring with physical attacks on the victim (Harmon et al., 1995, 1998).
Scoop

Paris, TX

#13 Feb 24, 2013
Myths and answers wrote:
<quoted text>Why respond?
Why would you bother responding to a post?
What makes you think you are an expert related to this?
Educate yourself. Inform yourself, or not. It's your choice, but you have no idea what it is like.
If you want to know, why not post your information and I will give you a taste of it so that you can create for yourself an empathetic response instead of a judgmental one.
LOL! You're an expert???????? Why do you bother to respond to a post? I have no idea what what is like? Cyberstalking? If you're afraid of cyberstalkers, why are you posting on a public forum? An educated informed person would just keep away from that if they had the fear you obviously have. It appears to me that you're just a sandwich or two shy of a picnic.
Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#14 Feb 24, 2013
Scoop wrote:
<quoted text>
LOL! You're an expert???????? Why do you bother to respond to a post? I have no idea what what is like? Cyberstalking? If you're afraid of cyberstalkers, why are you posting on a public forum? An educated informed person would just keep away from that if they had the fear you obviously have. It appears to me that you're just a sandwich or two shy of a picnic.
I'm not afraid of anything. This stuff is annoying.

Ignoring it doesn't help, so I'm giving it the attention they feel they need and deserve, to see if that doesn't stop it. The stalking is not just on topix. But victims aren't the problem. The pursuers are.

An actual educated, and informed person knows that you can't stop doing everything this person wants you to do, or they will be in control of your actions. Which is what the stalker is trying to do.

If you were actually educated, you would know that. But here is more information for your uninformed self.

Almost all stalkers have some type of mental or emotional problem. Stalkers will go across town, country, or even to different continents in order to continue their stalking. Stable people simply do not continue, often in the face of years of rejection, to pursue someone.

Stalkers, no matter what or how severe their mental disorder, can usually be sorted into one of three major
Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#15 Feb 24, 2013
I will be here posting until someone gets it.

Simple Obsession Stalkers

These stalkers have previously been involved in an intimate relationship with their victims. Often the victim has attempted to call off the relationship but the stalker simply refuses to accept it. These stalkers suffer from personality disorders, including being emotionally immature, extremely jealous, insecure, have low self-esteem and quite often feel powerless without the relationship.

While reconciliation is the goal, this stalker believes they must have a specific person back or they will not survive.

The stalker of former spouses or intimate partners, are often domineering and abusive to their partners during the relationship and use this domination as a way to bolster their own low self esteem. The control the abusers exert over their partners gives them a feeling of power they can't find elsewhere. They try to control every aspect of their partner's lives. Their worst fear is losing people over whom they have control.

When they realize this fear as the relationship finally does end, the stalker suddenly believes that his/her life is destroyed. Their total identity and feelings of self-worth are tied up in the power experienced through their domineering and abusive relationship. Without this control, they feel that they will have no self-worth and no identity. They will become nobodies and in desperation they begin stalking, trying to regain their partner and the basis of their power.

It is this total dependence on their partner for identity and feelings of self worth that makes these stalkers so very dangerous. They will often go to any length and stop at nothing to get their partner back. If they can't have the people over whom they can exert dominance and total control, their lives are truly not worth living. Unfortunately, along with becoming suicidal, they also often want to kill the intimate partner who have left them.

Stalking does not always begin with violence or trying to terrorize, it usually starts with, "Can I just talk to you or meet with you one last time?" " If you just talk to me I'll leave you alone." According to experts, "He wants her back, and she won't come back." Everything escalates from there and sometimes he snaps and assaults or kills her. In his mind, he makes the decision, "If I can't have you, no one else will." When he says this, he is attempting to cover his fear that she'll meet another man and leave him. Far too often, the police find that these stalkers follow through on their threats, killing the victims and then many times committing suicide. For them, death is better than having to face humiliation of the stalking victim leaving them for someone else, and the humiliation of having to face their own powerlessness
Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#16 Feb 24, 2013
Love Obsession Stalkers

These are individuals who become obsessed with or fixed on a person with whom they have had no intimate or close relationship. The victim may be a friend, a business acquaintance, a person met only once, or even a complete stranger.

Love obsession stalkers believe that a special, often mystical, relationship exists between them and their victims. Any contact with the victim becomes a positive reinforcement of this relationship and any wavering (even the slightest) of the victim from an absolute "NO" is seen as an invitation to continue the pursuit.

These stalkers will often read sexual meanings into neutral responses from the victim. They are often loners with an emotional void in their lives. Any contact with the object of the infatuation, even negative, helps fill this void. Failed relationships are the rule among these individuals.

Many suffer from erotomania. They have the delusion that they are loved intensely by another person, usually a person of higher socioeconomic status than them or an unattainable public figure. They are totally convinced that the stalking victim loves them dearly and truly, and would return their affection except for some external influence.

During questioning, police find that most love obsession stalkers have fantasized a complete relationship with the person they are stalking. When they attempt to act out this fantasy in real life, they expect the victim to return the affection. When no affection is returned, the stalker often reacts with threats and intimidation. When the threats and intimidation don't accomplish what they hoped, the stalker can often become violent and even deadly.
wow

Paris, TX

#17 Feb 24, 2013
Scoop wrote:
<quoted text>
LOL! You're an expert???????? Why do you bother to respond to a post? I have no idea what what is like? Cyberstalking? If you're afraid of cyberstalkers, why are you posting on a public forum? An educated informed person would just keep away from that if they had the fear you obviously have. It appears to me that you're just a sandwich or two shy of a picnic.
She says she's been at it here for 6 years. What's wrong with this picture?? She just keeps posting the same worn old articles.
Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#18 Feb 24, 2013
Some stalkers harass their victim not out of love but out of hate. Occasionally, stalking becomes a method of revenge for some misdeed against the stalker, real or imagined. Stalking can also be used as a means of protest. This is the smallest group, but this type of stalking, for revenge and protest, can be especially dangerous. There have been several killings by stalkers at abortion clinics, and mass murders around the country by employees who have been fired and then returned to stalk and eventually kill those who have fired them.

If I end up dead,(which I am not afraid of) I hope that these posts will at least spark someone to investigate.

I was forced off the road Thursday by a white impala. 4 people knew where my son and I were going. It wasn't an accident or someone with their head up their butt. It was someone waiting in an abandoned gas station parking lot.
Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#19 Feb 24, 2013
Scoop wrote:
<quoted text>
LOL! You're an expert???????? Why do you bother to respond to a post? I have no idea what what is like? Cyberstalking? If you're afraid of cyberstalkers, why are you posting on a public forum? An educated informed person would just keep away from that if they had the fear you obviously have. It appears to me that you're just a sandwich or two shy of a picnic.
My simple advice to you, is if you are just an annoying troll, don't troll on this one.

This is a little more serious than just a little aggrivation on line. I would appreciate it.

I'm asking you to please not be a joiner in this harassment. Thanks.
Myths and answers

Paris, TX

#20 Feb 24, 2013
wow wrote:
<quoted text>
She says she's been at it here for 6 years. What's wrong with this picture?? She just keeps posting the same worn old articles.
And I will keep doing it. I have not been on topix for 6 years. I don't even think topix is 6 years old. I don't know.

Death threat in 2007, and continued harassment on here since 2009.

It started 2 years before I knew anything about topix. Get the picture?

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