Bobby Lee Hines New Execution Date Se...

Bobby Lee Hines New Execution Date Set 10/24/12

Posted in the Paris Forum

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Psychoanalysis

Paris, TX

#1 Oct 3, 2012
Three weeks from today, justice will finally be served for the friends and family of victim Michelle Wendy Haupt. Her killer- after 21 long years- will finally be executed.
Lisa

Dallas, TX

#2 Oct 5, 2012
I know what he did was wrong but he will always be my friend. He is heavy on my heart right now. He never had a chance from the start moving around from foster homes.
Justice

Paris, TX

#3 Oct 11, 2012
Lisa wrote:
I know what he did was wrong but he will always be my friend. He is heavy on my heart right now. He never had a chance from the start moving around from foster homes.
Just thank your lucky stars you weren't alone in a room with him, an ice pick, and speaker wire cords. Michelle Wendy Haupt unfortunately was in Oct. 1991 and now he is finally, after 21 long years of agony for the victim's family and friends, about to pay for his crime.
Not really

Atlanta, TX

#4 Oct 11, 2012
Get on with the rat killing
Robinschimka

United States

#5 Oct 15, 2012
Well I am divided on this issue, I am so sorry For the victim an her family, but also I think 21 yrs on death row changes some people. I'm for life in prison never parole!! But the Texas killing machines are wrong. Texas has killed innocent people also!! An like I said after so much time so many inmates truly do change an grow an learn how to be compassionate an productive people, not all of them I am sure, an that is why thy should all do life!!

“This too shall pass”

Since: Aug 09

Location hidden

#6 Oct 15, 2012
Robinschimka wrote:
Well I am divided on this issue, I am so sorry For the victim an her family, but also I think 21 yrs on death row changes some people. I'm for life in prison never parole!! But the Texas killing machines are wrong. Texas has killed innocent people also!! An like I said after so much time so many inmates truly do change an grow an learn how to be compassionate an productive people, not all of them I am sure, an that is why thy should all do life!!
They appear to be changed while incarcerated, but should they be released, who knows what they'll do. I don't know the stats, but I do know that a large number of offenders who get parole or serve their time, go out and offend again. It's like that's all they know or care about.

“This too shall pass”

Since: Aug 09

Location hidden

#7 Oct 15, 2012
Lisa wrote:
I know what he did was wrong but he will always be my friend. He is heavy on my heart right now. He never had a chance from the start moving around from foster homes.
He's blessed to have a friend who truly cares for him.
As to his never having a chance, if he was in foster care, he had the same chances others in care have. He had the same choices to make and if he didn't have the moral compass to guide him to make good ones, he isn't likely to make them should he be released from death row.

My brothers and I were the victims of parental abuse, yet we've all 3 been law abiding citizens.
saw it happen

Paris, TX

#8 Oct 16, 2012
Robinschimka wrote:
Well I am divided on this issue, I am so sorry For the victim an her family, but also I think 21 yrs on death row changes some people. I'm for life in prison never parole!! But the Texas killing machines are wrong. Texas has killed innocent people also!! An like I said after so much time so many inmates truly do change an grow an learn how to be compassionate an productive people, not all of them I am sure, an that is why thy should all do life!!
bobby hines is an evil little shit. ask gary marlowe and the judges and others that dealt with him while he lived in paris,he deserves execution by stoning or some other unusual punishment.
Neutral View

Grand Prairie, TX

#9 Oct 24, 2012
I understand & appreciate the death penalty. I believe that some crimes warrant it due to their horrific nature. I understand some people change too. I know this family has waited years for justice.
What I don't understand is how no one here can have respect for his family. They have committed no crime here. They have to see all these posts. The criminal can't see your posts. It's not hurting his feelings one bit. The responsible people for his "raising" are not seeing this either. People who do care for him though are hurt by this. Even if they have remorse for the victim & her family, they are being tormented by these continual dragging through the mud process of this post.
Please remember you wouldn't want this if it was your family.
When

Arlington, TX

#10 Oct 24, 2012
When will Darlie Routier pay for her crime?
Kallie

United States

#11 Oct 24, 2012
Bobby Hines was my friend and always will be. I know what he did was wrong. He is on my Heart tonight.
friend of the family

Paris, TX

#12 Oct 24, 2012
Say what you want.. Today he is square with the house again.. debt paid.. rip bobby .. tonight your family morns the lose
Wow

Paris, TX

#13 Oct 25, 2012
Neutral View wrote:
I understand & appreciate the death penalty. I believe that some crimes warrant it due to their horrific nature. I understand some people change too. I know this family has waited years for justice.
What I don't understand is how no one here can have respect for his family. They have committed no crime here. They have to see all these posts. The criminal can't see your posts. It's not hurting his feelings one bit. The responsible people for his "raising" are not seeing this either. People who do care for him though are hurt by this. Even if they have remorse for the victim & her family, they are being tormented by these continual dragging through the mud process of this post.
Please remember you wouldn't want this if it was your family.
Who said his family had to see all these posts? If they don't want to read them, they don't have to. Dragging through the mud??? The man viciously murdered an innocent woman. Kind of hard to hose that kind of mud off, isn't it?

“This too shall pass”

Since: Aug 09

Location hidden

#14 Oct 25, 2012
Neutral View wrote:
I understand & appreciate the death penalty. I believe that some crimes warrant it due to their horrific nature. I understand some people change too. I know this family has waited years for justice.
What I don't understand is how no one here can have respect for his family. They have committed no crime here. They have to see all these posts. The criminal can't see your posts. It's not hurting his feelings one bit. The responsible people for his "raising" are not seeing this either. People who do care for him though are hurt by this. Even if they have remorse for the victim & her family, they are being tormented by these continual dragging through the mud process of this post.
Please remember you wouldn't want this if it was your family.
You've hit on the heart of the whole thing, I think. When one family member gets into trouble or commits a crime, the entire family and those who loved them suffer too. Not as badly as the victims family, I believe.
Night before last I watched part of the films that the German someone Hertzog. something like that, made. It was called into the abyss. This one was about a young man, Michael James Perry who with a friend of his, killed a woman and her son and a friend of his. The kid, Michael, looked like he was so innocent, till all the facts of his life came out. He had a good supportive family, but he didn't want to go to school and he didn't want to work, so they put him out. He'd even lived in the trunk of a friend's car, he hated work so bad. There's a lot to it, but in the end, it didn't upset me to see that he'd been executed in 2010.
There was his family as well as the daughter and sister of the victims and it was heartbreaking. It was all over a car they wanted.
Wow

Paris, TX

#15 Oct 25, 2012
Robinschimka wrote:
Well I am divided on this issue, I am so sorry For the victim an her family, but also I think 21 yrs on death row changes some people. I'm for life in prison never parole!! But the Texas killing machines are wrong. Texas has killed innocent people also!! An like I said after so much time so many inmates truly do change an grow an learn how to be compassionate an productive people, not all of them I am sure, an that is why thy should all do life!!
Name one person who was executed in Texas and provide the proof he/she was innocent. And as has been argued on here before, there is no such thing as life without the possibility of parole. Maybe in theory, but in practice, there's always a possibility they'll get out.
Who Knows

Arlington, TX

#16 Oct 25, 2012
Wow wrote:
<quoted text>
Name one person who was executed in Texas and provide the proof he/she was innocent. And as has been argued on here before, there is no such thing as life without the possibility of parole. Maybe in theory, but in practice, there's always a possibility they'll get out.
there is no proof just yet but Cameron Todd Willingham might be one who was executed by the state of Texas who was actually innocent.
He was convicted on supposedly flawed evidence regarding arson evidence. Scientists have proven that one piece of the evidence used was not enough for a conviction. His family has now petitioned the Board for a reversal of his conviction
Who Knows

Arlington, TX

#17 Oct 25, 2012
Carlos DeLuna may have been another.
Wow

Paris, TX

#18 Oct 25, 2012
Who Knows wrote:
<quoted text>there is no proof just yet but Cameron Todd Willingham might be one who was executed by the state of Texas who was actually innocent.
He was convicted on supposedly flawed evidence regarding arson evidence. Scientists have proven that one piece of the evidence used was not enough for a conviction. His family has now petitioned the Board for a reversal of his conviction
I didn't say name one who "might be" innocent. I said name one who had been proven innocent, because the poster I posed the question to said Texas had executed innocent people -- not Texas "might have" executed innocent people. I am well-acquainted with the Todd Willingham case. And I'm not convinced the jury erred in its decision. And I'm not convinced that because the standards for investigating arson changed that it means the original investigation was all wrong.
Disgusted

Arlington, TX

#19 Oct 25, 2012
Wow wrote:
<quoted text>
I didn't say name one who "might be" innocent. I said name one who had been proven innocent, because the poster I posed the question to said Texas had executed innocent people -- not Texas "might have" executed innocent people. I am well-acquainted with the Todd Willingham case. And I'm not convinced the jury erred in its decision. And I'm not convinced that because the standards for investigating arson changed that it means the original investigation was all wrong.
Wow! Calm down! Nobody said it had been proven. It is still under investigation but I do believe the experts know more that you or me . And it looks like they DO believe he was innocent as charged. If you know something they don't , them perhaps you should contact them?

" Willingham was convicted of murdering his two young children by arson. He spent 12 years on death row in Texas before he was executed. Forensic science that supposedly proved the fire was intentionally set was central to Willingham's conviction was, in fact, completely invalid -- which the experts who testified should have known in 1992. A state forensic science commission in Texas is officially looking into the case and selected a widely respected expert to analyze whether the forensic testimony was valid. Last week the expert filed a report confirming what five other leading arson experts have found -- what passed for arson analysis in the Willingham case had no scientific basis, and the scientific facts in Willingham's case were the same as the case of Ernest Willis. In an entirely separate case, Willis was sent to death row in Texas for an arson murder of family members but, luckily, in his the state recognized the arson analysis was wrong. Willis was fully exonerated just months after Willingham was executed.

The state forensic commission in Texas is still finishing its work on Willingham's case, but David Grann's New Yorker article examines the entire case, including the jailhouse informant who plainly gave false testimony and the circumstantial evidence, flimsy in the first place, that was not what it appeared to be to the jury. After reading Grann's report, fair-minded people will know beyond a reasonable doubt that an innocent person was executed

So what now? Whether our criminal justice system has executed an innocent man should no longer be an open question. We don't know how often it happens, but we know it has happened. Cameron Todd Willingham's case proves that."
Disgusted

Arlington, TX

#20 Oct 25, 2012
Chipita Rodriguez was hanged in San Patricio County, Texas in 1863 for murdering a horse trader, and 122 years later, the Texas Legislature passed a resolution exonerating her.

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