Shameful Obfuscation

Blue Island, IL

#224 Jan 4, 2013
Still Out of Compliance wrote:
Why is the JAWA still out of compliance?
This very important question remains unanswered. Alderman Domingo Vargas and his powerful Judiciary Committee refuses to address it. The law firm representing JAWA has a direct conflict of interest. Legal Sanctions need to be imposed om Alderman Attorney Domingo Vargas and the law firm that represents JAWA.
Compliance Issue

Chicago, IL

#225 Jan 4, 2013
Report wrote:
<quoted text>
This is not the way a project of this type is allowed to or can operate with millions of tax payer dollars.
Transparency is law.
7thWardTacxpayer

United States

#226 Jan 4, 2013
Shameful Obfuscation wrote:
<quoted text>
This very important question remains unanswered. Alderman Domingo Vargas and his powerful Judiciary Committee refuses to address it. The law firm representing JAWA has a direct conflict of interest. Legal Sanctions need to be imposed om Alderman Attorney Domingo Vargas and the law firm that represents JAWA.
What in the Hell are you babbling about? I've asked Alderman Vargas man to man what his position is on this sorry project. We sat dawn for lunch at a Mexican restaurant and he explained why he and other's on his committee are stalling and/or trying to kill it. But Mayor Peloquin has flunkies who are trying to keep it alive and Vargas is having a hard time fighting them off. He also claims the same thing with the "Home Rule" BS. More of Peloquins flunkies[Mark Poraska] are fighting to keep it afloat. It is an all out war now between Vargas & Peloquin. I have mentioned this problem to Aldreman Potaska and he looks away or clams up. Who do you believe? I go with Vargas because Potaska is a puppet.
think again

Blue Island, IL

#227 Jan 4, 2013
7thWardTacxpayer wrote:
<quoted text>
What in the Hell are you babbling about? I've asked Alderman Vargas man to man what his position is on this sorry project. We sat dawn for lunch at a Mexican restaurant and he explained why he and other's on his committee are stalling and/or trying to kill it. But Mayor Peloquin has flunkies who are trying to keep it alive and Vargas is having a hard time fighting them off. He also claims the same thing with the "Home Rule" BS. More of Peloquins flunkies[Mark Poraska] are fighting to keep it afloat. It is an all out war now between Vargas & Peloquin. I have mentioned this problem to Aldreman Potaska and he looks away or clams up. Who do you believe? I go with Vargas because Potaska is a puppet.
You can run but you cannot hide! Alderman Attorney Domingo Vargas voted 100% with the Frasor-Peloquin gang for twenty two years straight! And now he wants to distance himself because he is running for Mayor. He must really think the voters are his fools!

P.S. How are things in Dearborn MI?
Rubber Stamp

Blue Island, IL

#228 Jan 4, 2013
think again wrote:
<quoted text>
You can run but you cannot hide! Alderman Attorney Domingo Vargas voted 100% with the Frasor-Peloquin gang for twenty two years straight! And now he wants to distance himself because he is running for Mayor. He must really think the voters are his fools!
P.S. How are things in Dearborn MI?
Alderman Vargas is why they coined the phrase "Rubber Stamp" when it comes to the Alderman voting for everything his patron wants.
Explain

Chicago, IL

#229 Jan 4, 2013
Still Out of Compliance wrote:
Why is the JAWA still out of compliance?
The $Jawa$ is playing with $Million$ of taxpayer $dollar$!
Why has this been tolerated?
citizen

Robbins, IL

#230 Jan 4, 2013
OK, Domingo Vargas make your opinion KNOWN in public and start acting like you're your own man ( I don't think this is going to happen) just do what is good for B.I. and leave!!!!!!!!!!
For the Record

Chicago, IL

#231 Jan 4, 2013
Rubber Stamp wrote:
<quoted text>
Alderman Vargas is why they coined the phrase "Rubber Stamp" when it comes to the Alderman voting for everything his patron wants.
Alderman Vargas spent his whole career on the council as a puppet, in fact he may actually hold the record for Rubber Stamp Votes!
who

Country Club Hills, IL

#232 Jan 4, 2013
For the Record wrote:
<quoted text>
Alderman Vargas spent his whole career on the council as a puppet, in fact he may actually hold the record for Rubber Stamp Votes!
Who?? you mean Domingo "the doormat" Vargas is his own man? When did that start?
Stepping Down

Chicago, IL

#233 Jan 8, 2013
Robbins police chief, mayor stepping down

BY JOE BIESK jbiesk@southtownstar.com January 7, 2013 7:51PM

Johnny Lewis Holmes said Monday night that he had retired as police chief of Robbins last week.| Supplied photo

Updated: January 8, 2013 2:06AM

The Robbins police chief who authorities say exclaimed,“Oh wow,” when he was asked to take a sobriety test shortly before his drunken driving arrest last month has stepped down.

Johnny Lewis Holmes said he has retired from his post as police chief following his Dec. 22 arrest in Midlothian. Holmes, who was at the Robbins police department Monday night, said he retired Thursday.

“Officially, I am no longer chief,” Holmes said in a telephone interview.“Everything is relevant. I’ve done my time and it’s time for me to move on. And, in the best interest of all parties involved, that appeared to me and village officials the best resolution to all this.”

Midlothian authorities say the 66-year-old Holmes, who also is a member of the Community High School District 218 Board, was so disoriented on the night he was stopped for DUI that he thought he was still in the neighboring village of Posen. The incident marked Holmes’ second DUI arrest in Midlothian in less than three years.

Holmes allegedly admitted that he had been drinking in Posen the night he was stopped, and officers found a flask of alcohol in his jacket, according to a police report. He also failed two field-sobriety tests, and a subsequent Breathalyzer indicated his blood-alcohol level was .194, more than twice the legal limit, according to a police report.

According to court records, he was sentenced to court supervision and paid more than $1,000 in fees for the 2010 DUI citation.

He had led the Robbins Police Department since 1991.

Holmes said his future as a board member for District 218­— which includes Richards, Eisenhower and Shepard high schools ­— is still uncertain.

“I have not decided. That’s kind of a different case scenario and I have not decided what’s going to happen with that,” Holmes said.“I’ll be meeting with fellow board members and having some discussion I imagine.”

Reached at her home, Robbins Mayor Irene Brodie said she had heard of Holmes’ recent arrest in Midlothian and asked him to step down as police chief in her town.

“He said to me,‘Dr. Brodie, I just wanted to let you know that what I have done is not anything good,’” Brodie said in a telephone interview.“I said,‘I’m not happy about you.’

“He said to me,‘I will do whatever I can to quit. I will quit.’ He said that to me.”

Brodie, meanwhile, said she plans to step down as mayor at the end of the week, months before her term expires. Brodie said she has been mayor in Robbins for more than 30 years, and is stepping down from that post as well as from her teaching position at Moraine Valley Community College.

Her departure is not related to Holmes’ situation, she said.

“I’m just kind of tired,” Brodie said.“I’ve said to everybody,‘Don’t bother me anymore.’”
Dead

Chicago, IL

#234 Jan 9, 2013
What Are They Thinking wrote:
<quoted text>
This group has obviously over-reached themselves, repeatedly.
Over-Reached.
What

Chicago, IL

#235 Jan 9, 2013
How much did the Blow Holes cost?
Mark

Blue Island, IL

#236 Jan 14, 2013
When is the next meeting?
The Money is for What

Chicago, IL

#237 Jan 14, 2013
While many Southland officials are fed up with Chicago’s rising rates, Deetjen said Chicago’s system is recognized as the “best in the world.”

“It is the best example of how to have a good, safe quantity of water. We’re fortunate to be a neighbor to a world-class city,” he said.“There has never been a disruption in water service. That’s the key.”

Alsip Mayor Patrick Kitching, however, said four years of steady increases from Chicago — 25 percent in 2012, and 15 percent each year through 2015 — is “just insane.”

His town and six others have formed the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency in hopes of bypassing Chicago and tapping into the lake at Whiting, Ind., with their own pipeline.

The agency includes seven key members: Midlothian, Markham, Alsip, Harvey, Robbins, Blue Island and Calumet Park. Harvey sells water to Homewood, Flossmoor, Dixmoor, Hazel Crest, East Hazel Crest and Posen, while Alsip provides water to Crestwood and Palos Heights.

The agency has moved forward with a $5.5 million bond issue for a feasibility study and hopes to have cost estimates this spring, at which time it will decide whether it pays to move forward.

“We are not buying water from Indiana,” Midlothian Mayor Terry Stephens said.“We are taking it from the same lake. We will treat it and transmit it ourselves. I can’t say the costs will be lower, but we can prevent further increases.”

It is not just a matter of cost, but it is also “very important” to control the system, Blue Island Mayor Don Peloquin said, especially for towns that don’t want big water consumers — such as MetroSouth Medical Center in Blue Island, and the Coca-Cola plant in Alsip — to be chased away by high water bills.

“Chicago has been a good neighbor and I’m sure its increases are justified,” Peloquin said.“It has an antiquated system. It needs to upgrade the whole system and the best way is to pass the cost on.”

But if these towns can do it cheaper on their own, why not do it, he said. If it proves to be a cost-effective move, the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency hopes to have pipes in the ground by 2015-16.

“It’s either this or be stuck with Chicago and keep getting burned,” Kitching said.“Why should we tolerate what the city is doing to us? This is the future of our community.”

But creating a new water system is “extraordinarily difficult” to do, said Daniel Injerd, of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. Not only will these towns face financial and technical challenges, but also interstate issues. Members of the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency would be subject to Indiana regulations in addition to Illinois’.

Chicago has a huge water system that is built and paid for, Injerd said. Creating a new system would be like “building a highway next to an existing one,” he said.

It’s “inevitable” that rates go up, Injerd said, noting that there has been a “significant uptrend” in water rates in the last five years. But that revenue should be used to maintain the system and not for something else, he said.

Brett Postl, of Postl-Yore and Associates, the engineer for the project that would bring water from Whiting, conceded it’s “a very big project.”

“Everyone is looking at the cost of infrastructure over time, and operation and maintenance costs. Very preliminary numbers say it would be cost-effective,” he said.“Water is not going to be cheap.”

A route for this new system has not yet been established.

More towns and teamwork

Water itself is not getting more expensive, according to Josh Ellis, director of water resource programs for the nonprofit Metropolitan Planning Council. But it is more costly to capture, clean, transport and pump it, and pay for the associated energy, labor, chemicals and infrastructure projects to reduce leaks.
Details Details

Chicago, IL

#238 Jan 15, 2013
But creating a new water system is “extraordinarily difficult” to do, said Daniel Injerd, of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. Not only will these towns face financial and technical challenges, but also interstate issues. Members of the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency would be subject to Indiana regulations in addition to Illinois’.
Lesson

Chicago, IL

#239 Jan 15, 2013
The Money is for What wrote:
While many Southland officials are fed up with Chicago’s rising rates, Deetjen said Chicago’s system is recognized as the “best in the world.”
“It is the best example of how to have a good, safe quantity of water. We’re fortunate to be a neighbor to a world-class city,” he said.“There has never been a disruption in water service. That’s the key.”
Alsip Mayor Patrick Kitching, however, said four years of steady increases from Chicago — 25 percent in 2012, and 15 percent each year through 2015 — is “just insane.”
His town and six others have formed the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency in hopes of bypassing Chicago and tapping into the lake at Whiting, Ind., with their own pipeline.
The agency includes seven key members: Midlothian, Markham, Alsip, Harvey, Robbins, Blue Island and Calumet Park. Harvey sells water to Homewood, Flossmoor, Dixmoor, Hazel Crest, East Hazel Crest and Posen, while Alsip provides water to Crestwood and Palos Heights.
The agency has moved forward with a $5.5 million bond issue for a feasibility study and hopes to have cost estimates this spring, at which time it will decide whether it pays to move forward.
“We are not buying water from Indiana,” Midlothian Mayor Terry Stephens said.“We are taking it from the same lake. We will treat it and transmit it ourselves. I can’t say the costs will be lower, but we can prevent further increases.”
It is not just a matter of cost, but it is also “very important” to control the system, Blue Island Mayor Don Peloquin said, especially for towns that don’t want big water consumers — such as MetroSouth Medical Center in Blue Island, and the Coca-Cola plant in Alsip — to be chased away by high water bills.
“Chicago has been a good neighbor and I’m sure its increases are justified,” Peloquin said.“It has an antiquated system. It needs to upgrade the whole system and the best way is to pass the cost on.”
But if these towns can do it cheaper on their own, why not do it, he said. If it proves to be a cost-effective move, the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency hopes to have pipes in the ground by 2015-16.
“It’s either this or be stuck with Chicago and keep getting burned,” Kitching said.“Why should we tolerate what the city is doing to us? This is the future of our community.”
But creating a new water system is “extraordinarily difficult” to do, said Daniel Injerd, of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. Not only will these towns face financial and technical challenges, but also interstate issues. Members of the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency would be subject to Indiana regulations in addition to Illinois’.
Chicago has a huge water system that is built and paid for, Injerd said. Creating a new system would be like “building a highway next to an existing one,” he said.
It’s “inevitable” that rates go up, Injerd said, noting that there has been a “significant uptrend” in water rates in the last five years. But that revenue should be used to maintain the system and not for something else, he said.
Brett Postl, of Postl-Yore and Associates, the engineer for the project that would bring water from Whiting, conceded it’s “a very big project.”
“Everyone is looking at the cost of infrastructure over time, and operation and maintenance costs. Very preliminary numbers say it would be cost-effective,” he said.“Water is not going to be cheap.”
A route for this new system has not yet been established.
More towns and teamwork
Water itself is not getting more expensive, according to Josh Ellis, director of water resource programs for the nonprofit Metropolitan Planning Council. But it is more costly to capture, clean, transport and pump it, and pay for the associated energy, labor, chemicals and infrastructure projects to reduce leaks.
Do you get the feeling jawa was shopped around for years because of the pit falls?
Who will pay for this?
Could the money plus interest have been better spent?
anita

United States

#240 Jan 15, 2013
Alderman Vargas proved once again that he is against the people but for big business
Rubber Stamp

United States

#241 Jan 15, 2013
anita wrote:
Alderman Vargas proved once again that he is against the people but for big business
No, Alderman Vargas gave the 7th ward vote for a costly pet project.
Just Insane

Chicago, IL

#242 Jan 16, 2013
No Taxation Without Representation!
Doubts

Chicago, IL

#243 Jan 19, 2013
Our view: Doubts about towns’ water plans

SouthtownStar editorial January 18, 2013 11:28PM

A major benefit of residing in the Chicago region, one often taken for granted in the past, is the plentiful supply of high-quality Lake Michigan water for homes and businesses. But these days, hardly anyone is taking water for granted.

That’s because lake water, which is more expensive than well water, is getting even more costly — to the point where some suburbs are looking at alternatives, including forming water agencies, to try to save money.

We acknowledge the political heat that municipal officials are under as water rates rise sharply, but we’re uneasy about them trying to operate their own water systems. Doing so involves great cost and substantial risk — taking on high levels of debt to build or acquire water lines and pumping stations and operate them.

An official of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources warns that creating a new water distribution system is “extraordinarily difficult” because of the financial, legal and technical challenges involved. But several towns in South Cook and Will counties are not being deterred.

Seven towns have formed the South Suburban Joint Area Water Agency to explore getting lake water from Whiting, Ind., rather than Chicago via a new pipeline. Five others belong to the Northern Will County Water Agency, which plans to take over the water system of a private utility that town officials believe has gouged their residents for many years. Many other municipalities are chafing at the higher cost of water but see no alternative to Chicago.

Driving the unrest is Chicago’s decision to nearly double its lake water rate over four years, through 2015, to cover the cost of a massive project to improve its aging water delivery system. The 12 towns that get lake water from Chicago via Oak Lawn face added costs because of Oak Lawn’s plan to upgrade and expand its water system over four years.

With more suburbs going deeper into debt, using their home-rule power or a special kind of bond to avoid borrowing limits, towns need to be very careful about pursuing major water projects. Will towns really save significant money long-term? We’re not sure, but they better be.

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