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buffalobob

Hagerhill, KY

#1 Oct 31, 2012
I think it is such bull crap that everybody was worried about shutting these "pill mills" down when look at the suboxone clinics. Its stupid thats just another drug for people to get hooked on. Just saying.
Concerned Citizen

Hagerhill, KY

#2 Oct 31, 2012
Are you talking about the one at Hager Hill?
just saying

Logan, WV

#3 Oct 31, 2012
buffalobob wrote:
I think it is such bull crap that everybody was worried about shutting these "pill mills" down when look at the suboxone clinics. Its stupid thats just another drug for people to get hooked on. Just saying.
They only give it to you for a small amount of time to help you get off of everything else. Then that's it. And you know Not everyone has a perfect life.
Film Strip

Sitka, KY

#4 Oct 31, 2012
buffalobob wrote:
I think it is such bull crap that everybody was worried about shutting these "pill mills" down when look at the suboxone clinics. Its stupid thats just another drug for people to get hooked on. Just saying.
Bob, you sound disgruntled. Are you mad your pain clinic was shut down and now you have to pay street prices? And please, no one is getting hooked on Suboxone. You should know that.
buffalobob

Hagerhill, KY

#5 Nov 1, 2012
Yes i am pissed that they shut my pain clinic down if you had a long term illness you would know how it feels aswell. When you wake up in the morning in pain and it does no good to go to the doctor to get medication for your pain because they cant give you anything. i think its a shame that everyone has to suffer because of a few stupid people. thankyou and just for the record im really pissed because this morning i woke up in pain again.
buffalobob

Hagerhill, KY

#6 Nov 1, 2012
oh and concerned citizen, yes i am talking about the suboxone clinic at hager hill, it was a mess yesterday. there was cars parked everywhere and when i was on my way back home from picking my kids up from school and i noticed that there were cops there. i hope they r gonna stop them from parking along the roadway. those cars parked along the highway are gonna cause a wreck. thats my concern thankyou
buffalobob

Hagerhill, KY

#7 Nov 1, 2012
Is Suboxone Addictive?
Drug addiction is a complex process that involves both a physical dependency and a psychological component. The most addictive drugs produce a dual effect, both on your body and in your mind, that encourage you to continue abusing the drug. Buprenorphine, a drug found within Suboxone, is an opioid drug that has an addictive quality and can potentially be abused. To understand why a drug is a addictive, you must first understand the certain parts of the brain and how they function.

The Limbic System
The brain is a exceedingly intricate organ that performs millions of functions. When it comes to discussing drug use, physicians focus on the limbic system. The limbic system consists of a pair of structures – the hippcampus and the fornix – found deep within the central area of the brain. This area of the brain is responsible for at least two major functions.

Controls Emotion. The limbic system allows us to perceive and then express both negative and positive emotions. Damage or interference with the limbic system produces irrational changes in mood and behavior.
Reward Circuit. Limbic structures connect all the parts of the brain concerned with regulating the sensation of pleasure. When this circuit is activated, pleasure is experienced. The National Institute on Drug Abuse explains that this reaction positively reinforces whatever action was done to activate the reward circuit. For example, eating activates the reward center, so humans will continue to eat – a requirement for survival.
The pleasure center of the brain is controlled by the release and function of a neurotransmitter called dopamine. As dopamine levels increase within the limbic system, the more the reward center is activated. Therefore, high dopamine levels lead to more intense pleasure.

How Suboxone Affects the Brain
Suboxone is considered an opiate drug because of its active ingredient buprenorphine. Opiates are able to enter the brain and directly bind to receptors within the limbic system. The exact mechanism is not well understood, but the overall effect is that when the opiate binds to its receptors, more dopamine is released into the system. One theory is that opiates decrease the levels of another neurotransmitter called GABA which normally inhibits dopamine release. So when an opiate inhibits GABA levels, it indirectly enhances dopamine levels. This kind of reaction is called disinhibition.

No matter the underlying mechanism, the overall effect is that the patient will experience a temporary increase in pleasure. Theoretically, this will alleviate some of the negative psychological effects associated with detoxification.

When Does Suboxone Become Addictive?
Chronic abuse of Suboxone (e.g., snorting the drug or taking high doses) can cause the addict’s brain to become dependent on the drug. The brain has become accustomed to high levels of dopamine. Therefore, the pleasure center is only activated when there are high levels of the neurotransmitter. Without Suboxone or another opiate, the reward center does not activate and the patient is unable to feel normal pleasure. This is why some addicts do not find pleasure through eating, playing sports or other fun activities they used to enjoy.

Once your brain has adjusted to your use of Suboxone, you become physically dependent on the drug. You need the drug to experience pleasure. This is the foundation for addiction.
buffalobob

Hagerhill, KY

#8 Nov 1, 2012
And if these people that were addicted to pain pills have an addictive personallity then yes they will become dependent on suboxone.
SOMEBODY THAT KNOWS

Hagerhill, KY

#9 Nov 1, 2012
i have a family member that is hooked on suboxone and i live at hagerhill aswell. i noticed the traffic at that clinic aswell.
Film Strip

Sitka, KY

#10 Nov 2, 2012
Sorry Bob, wrong again. Suboxone is a partial agonist not a full agonist like your pain meds. The only way a person is "hooked" on Suboxone would be if they were opioid naive. Meaning if a person had never taken or abused opioids before. Nice dictionary of terms you wrote though.
And the family member that is "hooked" on Suboxone, you are being played by that person. They are "hooked" on whatever they were getting high on before. They are not taking their Suboxone everyday but telling you they are.
buffalobob

Hagerhill, KY

#11 Nov 2, 2012
i guess that everybody has there own opinions on this kind of thing but everything that i have read leads me to believe the opposite of what u r saying. so sorry that we disagree, nothing will change my mind that people will become dependent up on suboxone the same as any other drug. thankyou for your time.
people are dumb

Hagerhill, KY

#12 Nov 2, 2012
Yes, Suboxone is addictive. Whoever is saying that it is not are really naive. If you take it like you are suppose to you can still get dependent on suboxone. Once you start taking it and be on it for awhile you have to wean yourself off well the DR will lower your dosage after awhile and keep lowering it until you are officially off of suboxone.

Suboxone is addictive.
misb5

Stanton, KY

#13 Nov 2, 2012
The problem is no one wants off they just want their drugs. They all want you to believe they are not addicts but they are just trading one addiction for another . I personally would get dryed out if it was me . But not everybody is strong enough to do what needs to be done . I somked for a lot of years and quit that no pills no patches just threw them away . I was determined . My doctor told me not to ever have another one if I did I would have to go throught withdraw again. It was the hardest thing I ever did .
people are smart

Winchester, KY

#14 Nov 3, 2012
people are dumb wrote:
Yes, Suboxone is addictive. Whoever is saying that it is not are really naive. If you take it like you are suppose to you can still get dependent on suboxone. Once you start taking it and be on it for awhile you have to wean yourself off well the DR will lower your dosage after awhile and keep lowering it until you are officially off of suboxone.
Suboxone is addictive.
addiction is a chronic brain disorder brought on by prolonged use of opiates which results in diminished release of ones own endogenous endorphins. The ability to get off the meds depends on whether you can regain your capacity to produce your own endorphins. Unfortunately for most people they have done irreversible damage to their endorphin system making it nearly impossible to get off exogenous opiates like methadone, suboxone, and pain pills and this is why patients stay on maintenance treatment for life. It is similar to being an Alzheimer's or a Parkinson's patient...you would not try to wean these patients off their meds would you?
People who frown upon the use of suboxone or methadone or even pain pills for that matter don't understand the neurophysiological basis of the disease and so it is easy to judge people who are dependent on these meds.
Im bs 5

Winchester, KY

#15 Nov 3, 2012
misb5 wrote:
The problem is no one wants off they just want their drugs. They all want you to believe they are not addicts but they are just trading one addiction for another . I personally would get dryed out if it was me . But not everybody is strong enough to do what needs to be done . I somked for a lot of years and quit that no pills no patches just threw them away . I was determined . My doctor told me not to ever have another one if I did I would have to go throught withdraw again. It was the hardest thing I ever did .
sometimes it's not a matter of strength or willpower, it has more to do with brain chemistry and neurophysiology.
bubbaffool

Winchester, KY

#16 Nov 3, 2012
buffalobob wrote:
Is Suboxone Addictive?
Drug addiction is a complex process that involves both a physical dependency and a psychological component. The most addictive drugs produce a dual effect, both on your body and in your mind, that encourage you to continue abusing the drug. Buprenorphine, a drug found within Suboxone, is an opioid drug that has an addictive quality and can potentially be abused. To understand why a drug is a addictive, you must first understand the certain parts of the brain and how they function.
The Limbic System
The brain is a exceedingly intricate organ that performs millions of functions. When it comes to discussing drug use, physicians focus on the limbic system. The limbic system consists of a pair of structures – the hippcampus and the fornix – found deep within the central area of the brain. This area of the brain is responsible for at least two major functions.
Controls Emotion. The limbic system allows us to perceive and then express both negative and positive emotions. Damage or interference with the limbic system produces irrational changes in mood and behavior.
Reward Circuit. Limbic structures connect all the parts of the brain concerned with regulating the sensation of pleasure. When this circuit is activated, pleasure is experienced. The National Institute on Drug Abuse explains that this reaction positively reinforces whatever action was done to activate the reward circuit. For example, eating activates the reward center, so humans will continue to eat – a requirement for survival.
The pleasure center of the brain is controlled by the release and function of a neurotransmitter called dopamine. As dopamine levels increase within the limbic system, the more the reward center is activated. Therefore, high dopamine levels lead to more intense pleasure.
How Suboxone Affects the Brain
Suboxone is considered an opiate drug because of its active ingredient buprenorphine. Opiates are able to enter the brain and directly bind to receptors within the limbic system. The exact mechanism is not well understood, but the overall effect is that when the opiate binds to its receptors, more dopamine is released into the system. One theory is that opiates decrease the levels of another neurotransmitter called GABA which normally inhibits dopamine release. So when an opiate inhibits GABA levels, it indirectly enhances dopamine levels. This kind of reaction is called disinhibition.
No matter the underlying mechanism, the overall effect is that the patient will experience a temporary increase in pleasure. Theoretically, this will alleviate some of the negative psychological effects associated with detoxification.
When Does Suboxone Become Addictive?
Chronic abuse of Suboxone (e.g., snorting the drug or taking high doses) can cause the addict’s brain to become dependent on the drug. The brain has become accustomed to high levels of dopamine. Therefore, the pleasure center is only activated when there are high levels of the neurotransmitter. Without Suboxone or another opiate, the reward center does not activate and the patient is unable to feel normal pleasure. This is why some addicts do not find pleasure through eating, playing sports or other fun activities they used to enjoy.
Once your brain has adjusted to your use of Suboxone, you become physically dependent on the drug. You need the drug to experience pleasure. This is the foundation for addiction.
you need to understand the difference between addiction and dependence. Most see it as the same but there is a difference. While people who are addicted are probably dependent, not all people who are dependent are addicts.
misb5

Stanton, KY

#17 Nov 3, 2012
You will never know if you don't try . I don't believe you can't come off that stuff . I believe most people don't want too . The will power to want to has to be there it is just like people who smoke , they say I can't quit the truth is they just don't want to bad enough . You can't do anything if you don't want to bad enought . That is what I believe .
Im bs 5

Winchester, KY

#18 Nov 3, 2012
misb5 wrote:
You will never know if you don't try . I don't believe you can't come off that stuff . I believe most people don't want too . The will power to want to has to be there it is just like people who smoke , they say I can't quit the truth is they just don't want to bad enough . You can't do anything if you don't want to bad enought . That is what I believe .
many people have tried to come off the meds and failed. Do you really think people want to spend $400-500 every month to be on treatment by choice? Sure there are some who have been successful, but there are few of these lucky ones who have not done irrreversible damage to their neurological system, most are too far gone to ever be able to get off the meds. You are certainly entitled to your opinion, but know that it is just an opinion and not fact.
misb5

Stanton, KY

#19 Nov 4, 2012
Im bs 5 wrote:
<quoted text>
many people have tried to come off the meds and failed. Do you really think people want to spend $400-500 every month to be on treatment by choice? Sure there are some who have been successful, but there are few of these lucky ones who have not done irrreversible damage to their neurological system, most are too far gone to ever be able to get off the meds. You are certainly entitled to your opinion, but know that it is just an opinion and not fact.
And you are also allowed an opinion .
city council member

Prestonsburg, KY

#20 Nov 8, 2012
You can not walk around town without finding the packages it is a new epidemic

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