son started smoking!
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sherry

Calhoun, KY

#1 Jun 1, 2012
My 16 year old son got out of school last week and has been at home until his summer job starts. I came home early from work this week and found him smoking! Neither his father (deceased) nor I smoke! He told me he had been smoking for about a year. The boy he rides to school with got him started and he's managed to get to a pack a day before I just found out. He says he's addicted and can't quit - he's tried. He always works so he apparently buys his own cigarettes. It hurt this mother to see her little boy inhaling smoke into his lungs.:(. How can I get him to quit? Like I said, he said he has tried a few times and just can't. Should I just give up and let him smoke at home? Since I caught him he's been smoking in his bedroom before he even gets out of bed.:(

Since: Mar 12

Location hidden

#2 Jun 1, 2012
sherry wrote:
My 16 year old son got out of school last week and has been at home until his summer job starts. I came home early from work this week and found him smoking! Neither his father (deceased) nor I smoke! He told me he had been smoking for about a year. The boy he rides to school with got him started and he's managed to get to a pack a day before I just found out. He says he's addicted and can't quit - he's tried. He always works so he apparently buys his own cigarettes. It hurt this mother to see her little boy inhaling smoke into his lungs.:(. How can I get him to quit? Like I said, he said he has tried a few times and just can't. Should I just give up and let him smoke at home? Since I caught him he's been smoking in his bedroom before he even gets out of bed.:(
Who is buying them for him? How old is his friend?
rebel

Paducah, KY

#4 Jun 1, 2012
Where is he buying them because he must be 18 to purchase them? If you want to scare him, I would say take him down to 4 Rivers and ask to speak with a girl named Cindy Shelby that works there, she can make Jesus stop walking on water, she is that good and did wonders with a teen ager that I know!! I wouldn't advise going to the JV office because they are useless. I took my daughter there and the girl there said nothing was wrong with her, lets see using alcohol and getting caught by the law and nothing was wrong with her. Believe me, I wa grateful she got busted and when Ms. Shelby got done with her, she has become a changed child. Works, comes home and her grades are awesome now!
pond water

Willowbrook, IL

#5 Jun 2, 2012
sherry wrote:
My 16 year old son got out of school last week and has been at home until his summer job starts. I came home early from work this week and found him smoking! Neither his father (deceased) nor I smoke! He told me he had been smoking for about a year. The boy he rides to school with got him started and he's managed to get to a pack a day before I just found out. He says he's addicted and can't quit - he's tried. He always works so he apparently buys his own cigarettes. It hurt this mother to see her little boy inhaling smoke into his lungs.:(. How can I get him to quit? Like I said, he said he has tried a few times and just can't. Should I just give up and let him smoke at home? Since I caught him he's been smoking in his bedroom before he even gets out of bed.:(
buy him the gum and whip his ass! No dont give in and hell no dont let him stink up your house with that crap. I've been a tobacco user for years and started younger than him and wish i never did.
phil

Taipei, Taiwan

#6 Jun 22, 2012
I am a sinle dad and have been a smoker since I was 15.
I caught my 17 year old smoking the other day and surprised him by not getting mad at him, how could I?
I asked him how long he has been smoking and it turns out he started 6 months ago. Dad I really enjoy it and you can't make me stop. Where do you get your cigarettes ? We live in Taiwan and apparently they are not strict on age here.
Instead of blowing the whole thing up I just let him smoke. He will do it behind my back anyway. Can't say I am pleased but as a smoker (who has quit many times) I do know he will continue any way
Bain

United States

#7 Jun 22, 2012
I agree. I caught my 17 year old too. I didn't get too mad at him either. I know he's going to do it anyway. I did let him have it for getting his 15 year old brother to start. He had been smoking for a year and I could tell he was addicted. I did make the 15 year old quit or at least not do it at home, but I think his brother still covers for him. I don't like it but I can't say much since I have smoked since I was their age.
in his shoes

United States

#8 Jun 22, 2012
I had my first cigarette when I 12 years old. My neighbor, at the time, was my best friend and his parents smoked. I was the bone head who suggested we try it. 4 months later, my parents caught me, disciplined me, and I "quit". At 12 years old, I didn't really know how to smoke anyway, so it wasn't hard to quit. When I got into high school (14 years old), I started it again because that was "the thing to do". My parents caught me again at 16. They took away my car, I couldn't have company or go anywhere with my friends, and had to be in bed at a certain time for 3 months. Taking away my privileges made me "see the light".......... until I was 18 and could legally buy my own. Sadly, I've been smoking ever since. If your son wants to smoke, he will. There are things that you can do to punish him, but you've got to be careful... He may rebel and it may do more harm than good. I would suggest to continue to talk to him about it and be an open book. Let him know how disgusting it is, your feelings, fears, and concerns with it. Also, listen to what he has to tell you about it. He is 16... He is still a child rather he thinks so or not. You are his parent. Like my parents use to tell me "you live under MY roof, you follow MY rules". I remember having to write an essay for my dad explaining the process of photosynthesis. Maybe make him write a paper for you on the dangers and long term results of smoking as well as 2nd hand smoke. Doing the research and finding out the true facts may be more of an eye opener to him than you or he would realize. Its an expensive habit as well. Price a pack of cigarettes then show him how much it would cost him to continue the habit. Then explain what he could buy in the long run instead. Bottom line, you are his parent. You know your child. He lives under your roof. You know him, his behavior, moods, etc. There is no right or wrong answer to how to "take care of this". All you can do is try different things and hope SOMETHING works. Good luck!
Phil

Taipei, Taiwan

#10 Jun 23, 2012
Update,
Wrote about my 17 year old becoming a smoker and accepting it.
Came home today and found out my 14 year old started at the same time. He had the guts to tell me himself. Dad, since you let Jake smoke, I have to tell you something, so do I. Jake is a bit of a rebbel so I was not too surprised. Alex, however is more of a quiete "good" kid and really surprised me.
Jake and I started together so I have also been smoking for the last 6 months.
He told me the two of them had taken a couple of my packs of Marlboros and when I was on a business trip had decided to give it a try. It turns out I had been supplying them with smokes the first couple of weeks. Both of them are fully addicted and already smoke about a pack a day. This blew me away.
The three of us will be flying to the US next week for our summer vacation and the boys will stay with their mom, my ex for a while. She won't be to impressed by their smoking and I am sure to be blamed for setting a bad example.
I guess I should not have left my cigarettes so readily available so can only blame myself. Deep down inside I have to admit that I find it sort of cool how they fooled me.

Since: Apr 12

Location hidden

#11 Jun 23, 2012
rebel wrote:
Where is he buying them because he must be 18 to purchase them? If you want to scare him, I would say take him down to 4 Rivers and ask to speak with a girl named Cindy Shelby that works there, she can make Jesus stop walking on water, she is that good and did wonders with a teen ager that I know!! I wouldn't advise going to the JV office because they are useless. I took my daughter there and the girl there said nothing was wrong with her, lets see using alcohol and getting caught by the law and nothing was wrong with her. Believe me, I wa grateful she got busted and when Ms. Shelby got done with her, she has become a changed child. Works, comes home and her grades are awesome now!
rebel is right... cindy can do wonders with a child... it would benefit u both to talk to her
Angel

Kirksey, KY

#12 Jun 23, 2012
first it's cigarettes, then pot, next is booze, then crack! Better get your kid in check.
James

Nerima, Japan

#13 Jul 22, 2012
Know the feeling. Caught my 16 year old twin sons enjoying a cigarette on the deck. Came home early from work one day and went out to smoke a cigarette before taking my shower. Surprised the hell out of them and me. Guess I gave them a bad example. Turns out they have been smoking behind my back for about a year. Told them they were stupid to start but did not really yell at them, how could I. My dad gave me hell when he caught me at 17 (started at 14 myself) and said I would never be like him. They are 19 now and still are smokers. Like father like sons, I guess. My other, older son does not smoke.
Not much a smoker father can do when his kids copy him.
Guest

Murfreesboro, TN

#14 Jul 22, 2012
Dear Mom, Don't give in. Always stand up for what is right. There is absolutely nothing good that will come from smoking and much to gain from not. Being a parent can be hard and challanging at times, but you must stand up and be the parent. This does not make you popular with the child at the time but at some point in life they will understand and thank you. Give them the skills so when they too are patents, they will be able to influence and guide their children.
Brown Acres

Paducah, KY

#15 Jul 22, 2012
Let him smoke. Who cares. He's not going to live forever. Bring smoking sections back to the high schools.
Ben

Willemstad, Curacao

#16 Jul 31, 2012
Let your son smoke, once kids start they won't stop no matter what you say.
I had the same experience with my 15 year old. I am a 42 year old smoker and my son casually informed my he started smoking by lighting up when I did after dinner. It was uncomfortable for just a few minutes but you get used to it soon.
At least I did, I can't say I am happy he started but it is too late now. Told my kids they were not smart if they ever started smoking but what can you do when both of their parents smoke. I am divorced and my wife already knew about it.
"let your father decide" she told him.
Brian

San Francisco, CA

#17 Feb 9, 2014
I have been smoking since I was 17 years old and regret ever starting. I have tried to quit many times but have always started again. Now 30 years later I still smoke and have warned my kids not to make the same mistake. As I went to pick up my youngest son who is a freshman at UCLA for the Christmas Holidays to my horror I saw a pack of Marlboro Lights and a lighter on his desk but didn't say anything because I hoped they were his roommate's. But as we got ready to leave, Mike grabbed them and put them in his pocket so unfortunately they were his.
When I asked him how long he had been smoking he looked quite surprised. About a year now dad he said. Eventhough I am a smoker myself it hurt, but he is 19 so there is nothing I can do about it.
Trollmaster Funk

Cadiz, KY

#18 Feb 10, 2014
Whenever I get a packet of M&Ms, I make it my duty to continue the strength and robustness of the candy as a species. To this
end, I hold M&M duels.

Taking two candies between my thumb and forefinger, I apply
pressure, squeezing them together until one of them cracks
and splinters. That is the "loser," and I eat the inferior one
immediately. The winner gets to go another round.

I have found that, in general, the brown and red M&Ms are
tougher, and the newer blue ones are genetically inferior. I
have hypothesized that the blue M&Ms as a race cannot survive
long in the intense theatre of competition that is the modern
candy and snack-food world.

Occasionally I will get a mutation, a candy that is misshapen,
or pointier, or flatter than the rest. Almost invariably this
proves to be a weakness, but on very rare occasions it gives
the candy extra strength. In this way, the species continues to
adapt to its environment.

When I reach the end of the pack, I am left with one M&M, the
strongest of the herd. Since it would make no sense to eat this
one as well, I pack it neatly in an envelope and send it to M&M
Mars, A Division of Mars, Inc., along with a 3x5 card reading,
"Please use this M&M for breeding purposes."

This week they wrote back to thank me, and sent me a coupon
for a free 1/2 pound bag of M&Ms. I consider this "grant money."
I have set aside the weekend for a grand tournament. From a field
of hundreds, we will discover the true champion.

There can be only one.
wow

Paducah, KY

#20 Feb 10, 2014
Trollmaster Funk wrote:
Whenever I get a packet of M&Ms, I make it my duty to continue the strength and robustness of the candy as a species. To this
end, I hold M&M duels.
Taking two candies between my thumb and forefinger, I apply
pressure, squeezing them together until one of them cracks
and splinters. That is the "loser," and I eat the inferior one
immediately. The winner gets to go another round.
I have found that, in general, the brown and red M&Ms are
tougher, and the newer blue ones are genetically inferior. I
have hypothesized that the blue M&Ms as a race cannot survive
long in the intense theatre of competition that is the modern
candy and snack-food world.
Occasionally I will get a mutation, a candy that is misshapen,
or pointier, or flatter than the rest. Almost invariably this
proves to be a weakness, but on very rare occasions it gives
the candy extra strength. In this way, the species continues to
adapt to its environment.
When I reach the end of the pack, I am left with one M&M, the
strongest of the herd. Since it would make no sense to eat this
one as well, I pack it neatly in an envelope and send it to M&M
Mars, A Division of Mars, Inc., along with a 3x5 card reading,
"Please use this M&M for breeding purposes."
This week they wrote back to thank me, and sent me a coupon
for a free 1/2 pound bag of M&Ms. I consider this "grant money."
I have set aside the weekend for a grand tournament. From a field
of hundreds, we will discover the true champion.
There can be only one.
Your a GENIUS!!!.
N Flammatory

Paducah, KY

#21 Feb 10, 2014
Trollmaster Funk wrote:
Whenever I get a packet of M&Ms, I make it my duty to continue the strength and robustness of the candy as a species. To this
end, I hold M&M duels.
Taking two candies between my thumb and forefinger, I apply
pressure, squeezing them together until one of them cracks
and splinters. That is the "loser," and I eat the inferior one
immediately. The winner gets to go another round.
I have found that, in general, the brown and red M&Ms are
tougher, and the newer blue ones are genetically inferior. I
have hypothesized that the blue M&Ms as a race cannot survive
long in the intense theatre of competition that is the modern
candy and snack-food world.
Occasionally I will get a mutation, a candy that is misshapen,
or pointier, or flatter than the rest. Almost invariably this
proves to be a weakness, but on very rare occasions it gives
the candy extra strength. In this way, the species continues to
adapt to its environment.
When I reach the end of the pack, I am left with one M&M, the
strongest of the herd. Since it would make no sense to eat this
one as well, I pack it neatly in an envelope and send it to M&M
Mars, A Division of Mars, Inc., along with a 3x5 card reading,
"Please use this M&M for breeding purposes."
This week they wrote back to thank me, and sent me a coupon
for a free 1/2 pound bag of M&Ms. I consider this "grant money."
I have set aside the weekend for a grand tournament. From a field
of hundreds, we will discover the true champion.
There can be only one.
Have the blue m&m's got enough "blue guilt" to pay for all the brown m&m's babies? Are the blue m&m's that don't want to pay subject to diversity training?
Sue

United States

#22 Feb 10, 2014
At least it wasn't drugs.
Johan

Netherlands

#24 Mar 7, 2014
I am a smoker started when I was 15 and over the years have tried to quit many times. Warned my kids never to start smoking because like me they will regret it. To my surprise I caught my 18 year old son smoking when I payed him a surprise visit. He is at university so does not live at home. When I asked him how long he already smoked for he told me that he started almost two years ago but did not dare to tell me because he knew how disappointed I would be. It is your life son I said but mark my words you will regret becoming a smoker sooner or later.
As an 18 year old it is legal for him to smoke but actually watching him light up still is hard for me to see.

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