Dr. Charles Coram
Joyce Bromley

Centerville, IA

#1 Feb 10, 2008
I first met Dr. Charles D. Coram in 1999. At that time, I was the CEO of a thriving Mental Health Center serving many communities in Iowa. I worked with ideas and people, a mentally challenging career that involved long hours and little physical exercise. This lifestyle caught up with me in my 50’s and I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia. An RN, who had found relief from her own physical pain by treatments from Dr. Coram, sent me to him. From the first visit I was impressed with the thoroughness of his taking the time to know me as a person. His respect for my knowing myself, giving me the dignity of allowing me to know my own body, which I had inhabited for 50 years, was refreshing. I believe we all have a God given energy and awareness whether we listen to it or not. Dr. Coram used traditional manipulation and nontraditional as he helped me stretch, move and rearrange the energy in my body. I don’t have the words for what his treatment was like; I just know I got better. I have not returned to a traditional rheumatologist, as I know I do not have the soreness or the pressure point tenderness that produced the diagnosis in the first place.
Dr. Coram uses acupuncture, energy work, Reiki, manual manipulations and a type of yoga stretching. He truly is on the cutting edge, one of those doctors who do not follow the mold. He is not a “hothead” with a chip on his shoulder to prove others wrong but a thinker of tomorrow. He is always asking himself,“What are we missing, why is this person not improving, what knowledge does the person have about themselves that I as the doctor cannot know, no matter how thorough the examination?” Truly he integrates different medicines and philosophies without sacrificing his own integrity.
Dr. Coram practices what he preaches, integrity, flexibility and healthy life choices while grounded in a core set of beliefs. He willingly shares with others his insights and observations from his own practice, works within schools, hospitals and the community. As I come close to my retirement years I am pleased to see the next generation opening up to catalyst type practices which involve a total health concept. The concern for the person, the courage to change from traditional paths, while honoring what tradition can do, keeping vision alive while maintaining a full time patient load is not easy. Somehow, Dr. Coram manages to do this. We are longer a society where the doctor knows best. People are too well read and informed for that naivety. I believe most consumers want a doctor who will answer questions and truly hear what the consumer is requesting or saying. Dr. Coram integrates different types of healing, sees the value of each and is open to what his client wants or would respond to for treatment. His own visionary approach to medicine inspires others, his peers, community leaders and his patients.
Having known Dr. Coram personally, both as a community leader myself and one of his patients, I am confident that Dr. Coram will use his gifts of healing in a thoughtful planned way to advance medicine using a total health concept. Maneuvering through traditional models of medicine and finding the respect from the medical community is not an easy task.. Many visionary people have become disheartened and give in to the pressure of “learned minds” in traditional medicine. Dr. Coram has a resiliency to keep on keeping on, perhaps in part, because of his own deep belief that health and healing are so much more than our traditional ways can comprehend. Although no longer living in Iowa, I keep in touch with several people active in the community. I have seen and heard the respect and creditability Dr. Coram is earning.

Sincerely,
Joyce C. Bromley MA, LPC, LCSW
Kansas City, MO.
Dr Coram

Centerville, IA

#2 Mar 22, 2008
My family experienced two major medical errors in 2005. The first was my
newborn daughter Olivia. A nurse at Ottumwa Regional Health Center asked my
wife and I if we wanted our newborn daughter to receive the Hepatitis B
Vaccine. We both replied "NO" and signed a refusal document. Two hours
after Olivia was born the nurse gave our daughter the vaccine. We were told
that there was "Zero" risk to our daughter. Two weeks later Olivia stopped
breathing and was taken to the ER. She was in respiratory acidosis which is
caused from bronchial spasms. These spasms can be caused from asthma; she
is not asthmatic. Also, these spasms can occur within weeks of vaccines
caused by serium sickness. Our daughter had a severe reaction to the
Hepatitis B vaccine and almost died. The hospital fought the case and we
were unable to get legal help due to the small nature of the "payoff".
Since Olivia lived and has no indication of damage it is difficult to get
law firms interested.
Seven months after Olivia's experience my 36 year old sister (Heather) died
from Fentanyl Toxicity. Fentanyl is a pain medicine that was reported
months before my sister died to be killing people due to doctors misusing
it. The FDA warned doctors and hospitals in July of 2005 that it was
killing patients. She was given the highest dose of the medication and died
20 hours after a minor surgery. As of March 2008 the drug has been
recalled.
I am asking that families who have experienced medical errors to please
contact me and share your stories. We have to fight back because it is only
getting worse.
GOD HELP US!!!
Dr. Charles Coram
P.S. This information has been sent to the Ottumwa Courier many times, but they are refusing to publish it. The couriers efforts to protect the local medical community is at the heart of the problem. The truth should be shared and allow the American people to evaluated the facts.
Charles Coram

Centerville, IA

#3 Mar 23, 2008
First do no Harm
February 4, 2005 I wrote a letter to the editor regarding my concerns about our healthcare community in Ottumwa.
Today, I want to give the people of Ottumwa an update.
On April 06, 2005 my wife gave birth to a wonderful baby girl (Olivia). She was delivered at the Ottumwa hospital. Before she was born; one of the hospital nurses asked my wife and I if we wanted our daughter vaccinated with Hepatitis B. My wife and I did not want our baby vaccinated at that time and signed a document to this. I explained to the nurse why we did not want her vaccinated. I told her that there has been documented studies indicating a greater risk for SIDS and AUTISM among children being vaccinated under the age of 2.
Within 2hours after Olivia was born, they vaccinated her with Hepatitis B.
We were told by hospital officials that the form that we signed was difficult for the medical staff to read. The Director of the medical staff told me that there was no risk to our daughter.
On April 20, 2005 Olivia stopped breathing. I rushed her to the hospital were she experienced two more episodes in the ER. She was kept in the hospital for the day and observed without incidence. For the next month our little girl had chronic breathing problems with no explanation from the hospital for her episode. We were constantly worrying that it was going to happen again. The hospitals doctor did ask my wife and I if we knew CPR, just incase it happened again.
The Hospital continues to claim no liability in the incident that almost cost our 2 week old daughter her life. Since she survived and has no recognizable brain damage the hospitals position is “no harm no foul.“ Malpractice laws disagree.
Last year the Department for Health and Human Services requested that all healthcare providing agencies report any hospitalizations, ER visits, and deaths following vaccinations. The report is to be filed with the Centers for Disease Control.
My wife and I gave an ORHC doctor the document to be filled out and submitted.
It was never done.
I contacted the Centers for Disease Control and filed the document.
*The CDC is now investigating the incident as a possible adverse reaction to the vaccine.
There are over 200,000 reports every year of possible vaccine reactions in children.
Over the past month there have been many reports regarding vaccine reactions in the mainstream press.
As of July 25, 2005 the Hospital position:“Based upon the information available to us, including literature which disputes the claim that adverse affects occur with childhood immunizations, and no additional claim of present injury to the child it does not appear that a financial settlement, of any amount, is warranted under the circumstances.”
On April 20, 2005 I rushed my 2 week old daughter to the ER because she was not breathing.
One of the possible adverse effects of Hepatitis B vaccines is AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION.
I encourage both the medical community and there patients to become more educated in the risks associated with the treatments that are provided.
***FIRST DO NO HARM!
Dr. Charles D. Coram
Layman Allen

Centerville, IA

#4 Apr 6, 2008
Ottumwa lucky to have a specialist like Dr. Coram

On one of my annual visits to Fairfield, my son told me about hockey teammates who had career-ending injuries until they were treated by Dr. Charles Coram, a chiropractor in Ottumwa. The teammates were soon playing hockey again and attributed their recovery solely to Dr. Coram’s efforts. This got my attention.
My son suggested that I see Dr. Coram because of 20 years of extreme leg pain from chronic sciatica that recently prevented me from sleeping in bed for more than an hour at a time. I agreed, and after my first treatment was able to sleep in bed all night!
I live in Ann Arbor, Mich.(a nine-and-one-half-hour drive from Ottumwa each way), and as a recently retired professor at the University of Michigan, have seen many specialists over the past 15 years — doctors including neurologists and other specialists, MDs, physical therapists, even an acupunturist — who have all treated me for this problem without much success.
I am now traveling to Ottumwa each month to be treated by Dr. Coram, who is the only medical professional who has been able to provide relief for my problem or any improvement in my overall condition. Each of my treatments has taken two-to-four hours, but has been unbelievably helpful. I see a noticeable improvement in my overall condition each time I meet with Dr. Coram. Ottumwa is very lucky to have such a helpful health specialist in its community.

Layman E. Allen
Professor of Law, Emeritus
Law School, University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Mich.
Andy Alderson

Centerville, IA

#5 Apr 6, 2008
Setting the record straight about doctors' roles

A recent letter about Ottumwa’s health care practitioners by Kathy Gleich had insinuations that chiropractors aren’t qualified doctors. Unfortunately, Ms. Gleich is afflicted with a bit of ignorance regarding chiropractic medicine. This is not her fault; however, the lack of knowledge doesn’t make it acceptable for her to degrade people of that profession who have earned their degrees and provide a level of health care that, in my view, is superior to what people consider “medicine.”


A common misunderstood notion is that doctors heal you when you’re ailing. Doctors do not heal anyone. They merely provide methods for relief so the body can heal itself. The body’s cells have to rebuild and repair and will do so at their healthy biological limit. Sometimes a trauma or damage is too great for full repair to take place, but that’s just a fact of nature and no doctor can make your body any more than it can be. A wise doctor once said to me,“Your body can heal itself if you just get out of its way.”

I believe there is no substitute for surgery if it’s needed or the proper medication, again if needed, but the side effects of those “invasions” on the body can have unpleasant consequences even if they aren’t realized immediately. The problem here is that sometimes the “methods of relief” come in the form of medicines or surgeries that could be avoided if the doctor administering the treatments were truly engaged with their client — completely, 100% involved in that patient’s well being and not so interested in stifling the symptoms so they can move onto the next patient.

I’m afraid many doctors, even ones here at home, have become detached from what they’re really doing. Some of that comes from pressures — from superiors to see more patients, from social status, from peers in the profession, from pharmaceutical companies to administer their “latest greatest.”

This type medicine we can all do without and that’s the point Dr. Coram is making. If you reread Dr. Coram’s letter, you’ll not see him questioning the qualifications of the Ottumwa physicians, but rather the ethical nature and behavior of the practicing medical community in general. The letter points out that when a new doctor comes into the community, he is forced to either conform to this “disengaged” method of treatment or be an outcast. Therefore, it leaves those new physicians a choice ... stay or go.

For someone to become a doctor of chiropractic medicine, they actually put in more credited hours than an MD and must have extensive knowledge of the nervous system. Our body is completely dependent on the nervous system and if it is under duress or compromised in any way, it will affect the rest of the body and how we feel.

Andy Alderson

Ottumwa
Deb Moore RN BSN

Centerville, IA

#6 Apr 6, 2008
Dr. Coram is a gem to the community
“A Jewel in Ottumwa.” I have been reading the Letters to the Editor by and about Dr. Charles Coram with great interest and decided it was time to speak up. Dr. Coram “is” a Doctor of Chiropractic Medicine. He is also a nurse, and boy, do I wish all doctors had to go through nurses training before they get their licenses! Dr. Coram also has a degree in Holistic Medicine. He makes it part of his practice to know his clients well and treats them with the respect they so rightly deserve.
Yes, he is a “Chiropractor,” but he treats the whole person. Which means not just the physical being, but the mind, body and spirit of each individual. Being human, the mind, body and spirit are all connected and play a huge part in the healing process and how we feel on a daily basis. Dr. Coram understands this.
If a client does need a medical procedure, or consultation, Dr. Coram does not hesitate to refer them to the appropriate office. Now I ask you. Wouldn’t the world be a better place if that courtesy extended both ways?
People fear the unknown. This community has no idea what a jewel they have in Dr. Charles Coram and unfortunately they probably won’t realize it until he is gone. How sad.
Deb Moore, RN, BSN
Ottumwa
Professor Leslie A Olsen

Centerville, IA

#7 Apr 6, 2008
Dr. Coram's treatment provides great benefits

As the wife of Professor Layman Allen whose letter is just above, I would like to confirm the wonderful results he has experienced from his treatments from Dr. Coram.
In talking about these to acquaintances in Fairfield, we were sorry to hear about the approximately 60 doctors who have come and gone from Ottumwa in the past eight years, but hope that you will continue to keep Dr. Coram within convenient reach of our son’s home in Fairfield.
Of course, we’d be delighted if Dr. Coram moved to Ann Arbor, but (seriously) we are very happy to come all the way to Ottumwa to be treated because Dr. Coram is the only health specialist who has provided any relief for my husband’s condition, and we have consulted many medical personnel at the University of Michigan Health System (one of the best in the world).
For us, it is worth an 18-20 hour drive or flight each month to get the benefits of Dr. Coram’s treatment.

Leslie A. Olsen
Professor and Director
Program in Technical Communication
College of Engineering
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Mich.
Margaret Gardner

Centerville, IA

#8 Apr 6, 2008
We are lucky to have Dr. Coram in our community

I want to congratulate Deb Moore on her wonderful letter to the editor in the Feb. 14th Ottumwa Courier.
She has certainly laid it on the line as to how lucky we are to have Dr. Coram and all his care and ability. If the medical group in our city was half as dedicated as he is and would work with him we would be extremely lucky.
Dr. Coram works hard to relieve his followers of their problems. I know of a case that a man had inner ear problems and would have to take medication to get relief. This is no longer the case since he has been to Dr. Coram.
He is indeed a jewel in our community and we need to be thankful that he is here.

Margaret Gardner
Ottumwa
Andy Alderson

Centerville, IA

#9 Apr 6, 2008
Setting the record straight about doctors' roles

A recent letter about Ottumwa’s health care practitioners by Kathy Gleich had insinuations that chiropractors aren’t qualified doctors. Unfortunately, Ms. Gleich is afflicted with a bit of ignorance regarding chiropractic medicine. This is not her fault; however, the lack of knowledge doesn’t make it acceptable for her to degrade people of that profession who have earned their degrees and provide a level of health care that, in my view, is superior to what people consider “medicine.”
A common misunderstood notion is that doctors heal you when you’re ailing. Doctors do not heal anyone. They merely provide methods for relief so the body can heal itself. The body’s cells have to rebuild and repair and will do so at their healthy biological limit. Sometimes a trauma or damage is too great for full repair to take place, but that’s just a fact of nature and no doctor can make your body any more than it can be. A wise doctor once said to me,“Your body can heal itself if you just get out of its way.”
I believe there is no substitute for surgery if it’s needed or the proper medication, again if needed, but the side effects of those “invasions” on the body can have unpleasant consequences even if they aren’t realized immediately. The problem here is that sometimes the “methods of relief” come in the form of medicines or surgeries that could be avoided if the doctor administering the treatments were truly engaged with their client — completely, 100% involved in that patient’s well being and not so interested in stifling the symptoms so they can move onto the next patient.
I’m afraid many doctors, even ones here at home, have become detached from what they’re really doing. Some of that comes from pressures — from superiors to see more patients, from social status, from peers in the profession, from pharmaceutical companies to administer their “latest greatest.”
This type medicine we can all do without and that’s the point Dr. Coram is making. If you reread Dr. Coram’s letter, you’ll not see him questioning the qualifications of the Ottumwa physicians, but rather the ethical nature and behavior of the practicing medical community in general. The letter points out that when a new doctor comes into the community, he is forced to either conform to this “disengaged” method of treatment or be an outcast. Therefore, it leaves those new physicians a choice ... stay or go.
For someone to become a doctor of chiropractic medicine, they actually put in more credited hours than an MD and must have extensive knowledge of the nervous system. Our body is completely dependent on the nervous system and if it is under duress or compromised in any way, it will affect the rest of the body and how we feel.

Andy Alderson
Ottumwa
Addie Giltner

Centerville, IA

#10 May 19, 2008
Dr. Coram a great asset to the area
Mon, May 12 2008

— It was with great interest that I read the letter by Dr. Charles Coram in the April 30 Courier. Over the years my family has dealt with some excellent doctors in the Ottumwa Health Care system and I would certainly be remiss if I didn’t point out that we still have many excellent doctors in Ottumwa.
What I find frustrating is the fact that it seems they don’t have the time to offer the type of quality care they have in the past or that many of them desire to provide for their patients. Why is this?
I believe it means a great deal to have a doctor who is not only knowledgeable in their field but also shows a genuine interest in your case, one who is willing to take the time to listen to the patient and is persistent in helping that patient to heal and have as good a quality of life as possible.
I have a great deal of respect for Dr. Coram’s opinion. Over a period of 12 years I saw five different doctors for chronic back and hip pain. There didn’t seem to be a solution except therapy and pain pills.
I read an editorial about Dr. Coram in another newspaper and contacted him. In five months he has been able to give me relief from at least 75 percent of the pain and without medication. He is a very considerate, kind and caring doctor and is extremely knowledgeable in his field and constantly striving to learn more. I believe he is one of the hidden treasures among Ottumwa’s medical professionals.
Addie Giltner
Batavia
Tom Seimers

Centerville, IA

#11 May 19, 2009
A belated thank you for your letter of support published in the Courier. I appreciate the honest dialogue you and I have been able to establish. I also appreciate that you truly wish to see our healthcare community come together in service to our patients. Please help me to do that by continuing to question, probe, seek and find ways to make this happen.

Tom Seimers
(CEO of Ottumwa Regional Health Center)

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