Local astronomy events

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#30 Apr 2, 2011
Last reminder bump

-*-*-*Free Star Party*-*-*-

Program Name: The Night Sky a Cultural Clock
Date: April 2, 2011
Time: 8:00 pm to 9:30 pm
Location: Oliver Lee Memorial State Park Group Shelter

Description: Enjoy the beauty of Dog Canyon at sundown. Learn about celestial cycles and how early cultures used the night sky to time their daily lives. Join the Amateur Astronomers Group for a tour of the stars and constellations in the dark skies over Oliver Lee Memorial State Park. Hot beverages will be provided.

For information call:
5 7 5 - 4 3 7 - 8 2 8 4

http://www.astronomersgroup.org/

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#32 May 4, 2011
METEORS FROM HALLEY'S COMET:
Looking for an adventure? Get up in the wee hours of the morning May 6th and head out into the country, far from the city lights. You won't be alone. The birds will be up and singing about the coming dawn, and, of course, about the eta Aquarid meteor shower.

The eta Aquarids are best viewed from the southern hemisphere, but there's something special about them no matter where you live: "Each eta Aquarid meteoroid is a piece of Halley's Comet doing a kamikaze death dive into the atmosphere," explains NASA astronomer Bill Cooke. "Many people have never seen this famous comet, but on the morning of May 6th they can watch bits of it leave fiery trails across the sky."

A messenger from the dawn of the universe, Halley's Comet orbits the sun once every 76 years. Each time it swings by the sun, intense solar heat vaporizes about 6 meters of ice and rock from the nucleus. The debris particles, about the size of sand grains, spread along the comet's orbit, filling it with tiny meteoroids.

"Although Halley's Comet is deep in the outer solar system at the moment and won't return to Earth until 2061, it treats us to a meteor shower twice a year as our planet passes by the debris cloud," says Cooke. "In May we have the eta Aquarids, and in October the Orionids."

And there is something especially significant about the 2011 eta Aquarids.

"This is your one chance this year to see meteors blaze across the sky without glaring moonlight dimming them."

A thin crescent moon will vacate the sky in the early evening, leaving a dark canvas for the display. Early risers are in luck, as the best viewing is an hour or two before dawn. Lie down where you can see as wide an expanse of sky as possible to catch more meteors with your peripheral vision. Look up into the darkness and relax.

The radiant for the eta Aquarids is in the constellation Aquarius. But you don't need to look toward the radiant to see the meteors.

"Meteors can appear in any part of the sky," says Cooke. "In fact their trails will tend to point back toward the radiant, so if you look that way the meteor may appear somewhat stubby. They'll appear much longer going by you than coming at you."

You won't need binoculars or a telescope to observe eta Aquarid meteors. The naked eye's field of view is usually best for seeing meteors, which frequently streak more than 45 degrees across the sky.

"Eta Aquarids are fast, moving at 66 km/s (148,000 mph!), and often trace long paths across the sky, sometimes leaving glowing, persistent trains. In the northern hemisphere, depending on your latitude [the closer to the equator the better], you should see from 10 to 40 meteors just before dawn."

Remember to pack a reclining chair or an old blanket to lie on, and a thermos of hot coffee would be nice. After all, you'll be up mighty early! The spring night air may be damp and chill, so bring along another blanket--or better yet, a big furry dog, both for warmth and company. Golden Retrievers work nicely.

It's sure to be a memorable experience. A night breeze caressing your cheek, the aroma of hot coffee in the predawn air, a gently rising chorus of birdsong accompanying your own personal light show -- and your greatest admirer by your side. It just doesn't get any better.

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-...

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#33 May 6, 2011
Four planets will cluster together next week

Four planets will huddle close together, visible to the naked eye, in the predawn sky next week, according to the editors of StarDate magazine.

"The best view is from the southern states because the path the planets follow across the sky (the ecliptic) stands at a little higher angle relative to the horizon," the magazine's editors said.

Venus and Jupiter will be easy to spot hanging low in the east as dawn brightens on May 10. They are the brightest objects in the night sky after the Moon. Venus, the brighter of the two, will be to the right of Jupiter.

Mercury will be visible to the lower right of Venus, about the same distance from Venus to Jupiter. It won't be as bright but its proximity to Venus will help you find it. To the lower left of Jupiter you'll find Mars, which may be too low and faint to see without the aid of binoculars.

StarDate magazine is a bi-monthly publication of The University of Texas at Austin McDonald Observatory, which houses many telescopes responsible for a wide range of astronomical research. McDonald Observatory is also pioneering the next generation of astronomical research as a founding partner of the Giant Magellan Telescope.

http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/05/06/four-pla...

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#35 May 9, 2011
Just getting an early word out for our an upcoming free astronomy event. On May 28th, we will be hosting an all-day astronomy education and star party. So if you looking for something different, fun, and free to do or looking for a different way to celebrate your high school graduation, come join us at Oliver Lee Memorial State Park.

We'll be viewing everything from the sun to Saturn.
The event starts at 1:00pm with programs lasting throughout the day. The star party, which features Saturn in Virgo, begins at 7:00pm.

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#37 May 21, 2011
ALL DAY ASTRONOMY EVENT - MAY 28, 2011 OLIVER LEE MEMORIAL STATE PARK

Program Name: Solar Viewing
Time: 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm
Location: Oliver Lee Memoria State Park Group Shelter
Description: Join the Amateur Astronomers Group for afternoon of solar viewing. View sunspots, prominences and solar flares through telescopes using either a hydrogen alpha filter or white light filter. Activity on the Sun has increased in recent months so come out and learn about these and other solar phenomena, while safely viewing the surface of the sun.

Program Name: The Year of the Solar System
Time: 3:00 pm to 4:30 pm
Location: Oliver Lee Memorial State Park Visitor Center
Description: NASA has declared October 2010 to August 2012 “The Year of the Solar System”, which is actually the length of the Martian year, 23 months. With triple the usual number of launches, flybys and planetary insertions, this period of space history may be remembered as the golden age of planetary exploration. Join James Tomaka of the Amateur Astronomers Group for a presentation about these exciting NASA missions.

Program Name: Mogollon Solar Observatories
Time: 5:00 pm to 6:30 pm
Location: Oliver Lee Memorial State Park Visitor Center
Description: The Jornada Mogollon people raised corn, beans and squash in the Tularosa Basin. They measured the year and the seasons to maximize agricultural success at two sites in the Sacramento Mountains, Wizard’s Roost and Wally’s Dome. Join NMSU-A Archeologist Pete Eidenbach for an exploration of these two ancient astronomical observatories.

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#38 May 21, 2011
ALL DAY ASTRONOMY EVENT - MAY 28, 2011 OLIVER LEE MEMORIAL STATE PARK

PROGRAMS CONT.

Program Name: Ancient Astronomy & Sky Stories
Time: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm
Location: Oliver Lee Memorial State Park Group Shelter
Description: Join Park Ranger Charles Wood for a multi-cultural exploration of ancient astronomy and sky stories. Ranger Wood will reveal how the ancient peoples viewed the cosmos and their place in it. Ancient astronomers developed the first calendars, while constellation stories helped bind their cultures together.

Program Name: Saturn in Virgo
Time: 9:00 pm to 10:30 pm
Location: Oliver Lee Memorial State Park Group Shelter
Description: Join the Amateur Astronomers Group for a telescope tour of the spring night sky. This spring Saturn dominates the sky residing in the constellation Virgo. The spring sky is full of deep space objects to see; from galaxies far-far-away to spectacular star clusters and the nebulae where stars are born.
For information call:
5 7 5 - 4 3 7 - 8 2 8 4

http://www.astronomersgroup.org/

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#40 May 22, 2011
JUST ADDED TO THE ALL DAY ASTRONOMY EVENT:

The National Solar Observatory will be bringing their 18' sun balloon and will be talking with children and parents about the solar system and how to build their own models. This will be presented by Dave Dooling.
Thank you

Alamogordo, NM

#41 May 22, 2011
I just took Astronomy at NMSU, with Professor Dimitry... something. Worst class I have ever taken at the school. Made me even less interested.

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#42 May 23, 2011
Thank you wrote:
I just took Astronomy at NMSU, with Professor Dimitry... something. Worst class I have ever taken at the school. Made me even less interested.
Sorry your experience was less than stellar. Did you ever get to view DSOs through a telescope?
Thank you

Alamogordo, NM

#43 May 23, 2011
No I didn't, I spent too much time in survival mode to actually retain anything.

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#44 May 23, 2011
Thank you wrote:
No I didn't, I spent too much time in survival mode to actually retain anything.
Well I invite you to come to Oliver Lee on Saturday and see everything from the Sun to Saturn. It is truly a jaw-dropping experience.

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#45 May 25, 2011
FREE - Year of the Solar System all day astronomy event and star party on May 28, 2011 at Oliver Lee Memorial State Park. Programs begin at 1:00pm and run all day.
Come out and we'll show you everything from the Sun to Saturn.

www.astronomersgroup.org

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#47 May 27, 2011
At Saturday's star party, we'll also try aiming our telescope towards Comet Elenin. It was discovered on December 10, 2010 by Russian astronomer, Leonid Elenin, using a robotic telescope near Mayhill, NM.

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm...
WARRIOR

Washington, DC

#49 May 27, 2011
Is this the Barb Moore thread? Just spoofing. You do provide useful, valuable information on here.

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#50 May 28, 2011
***One last reminder***

FREE - Year of the Solar System all day astronomy event and star party on May 28, 2011 at Oliver Lee Memorial State Park. Programs begin at 1:00pm and run all day. For program description, see comments above or the AAG homepage link below

Come out and we'll show you everything from the Sun to Saturn and comet Elenin.

www.astronomersgroup.org

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#52 May 29, 2011
WOW! We had a fantastic turnout yesterday. For those of you that came out, THANK YOU. Now for those of you that would like another view of Saturn, or perhaps you missed yesterday's star party, we're having another star party this Saturday, June 4th.

Program Name: Callisto and Arcus
June 4th
Time: 9:00 pm to 10:30 pm
Location: Oliver Lee Memorial State Park Group Shelter
Description: The Amateur Astronomers Group will be sponsoring a summer sky tour. Learn the constellations Ursa Major and Bootes, which are linked by the myths of Callisto and Arcus. Come early and enjoy the beauty of Dog Canyon at sundown. For information call:
5 7 5 - 4 3 7 - 8 2 8 4
http://www.astronomersgroup.org/

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#53 Jun 2, 2011
Want to check out Saturn in all her glory?
Come out to Oliver Lee for a free star party!

Program Name: Callisto and Arcus
June 4th
Time: 9:00 pm to 10:30 pm
Location: Oliver Lee Memorial State Park Group Shelter
Description: The Amateur Astronomers Group will be sponsoring a summer sky tour. Learn the constellations Ursa Major and Bootes, which are linked by the myths of Callisto and Arcus. Come early and enjoy the beauty of Dog Canyon at sundown. For information call:
5 7 5 - 4 3 7 - 8 2 8 4

http://www.astronomersgroup.org/

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#55 Jun 4, 2011
Last bump reminder

Want to check out Saturn in all her glory?
Come out to Oliver Lee for a free star party!

Program Name: Callisto and Arcus
June 4th
Time: 9:00 pm to 10:30 pm
Location: Oliver Lee Memorial State Park Group Shelter
Description: The Amateur Astronomers Group will be sponsoring a summer sky tour. Learn the constellations Ursa Major and Bootes, which are linked by the myths of Callisto and Arcus. Come early and enjoy the beauty of Dog Canyon at sundown. For information call:
5 7 5 - 4 3 7 - 8 2 8 4

http://www.astronomersgroup.org/

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#57 Jun 29, 2011
---Free Star Party---
Another chance to see Saturn!

Program Name: Hercules
July 2nd
Time: 9:00 pm to 10:30 pm
Location: Oliver Lee Memorial State Park Group Shelter

The Amateur Astronomers Group will be sponsoring a summer sky tour of major constellations like Hercules, Draco, and Leo that are connected by their mythology. Saturn will also be prominent in the night sky. Come early and enjoy the beauty of Dog Canyon at sundown.
For information call:
5 7 5 - 4 3 7 - 8 2 8 4
http://www.astronomersgroup.org/

“Our nearest star”

Since: May 09

Alamogordo, NM

#58 Jul 1, 2011
Prepare for Independence Day by viewing celestial fireworks in the night sky above Oliver Lee Memorial State Park.

-*-*-*Free Star Party*-*-*-

Program Name: The Night Sky a Cultural Clock
Date: April 2, 2011
Time: 8:00 pm to 9:30 pm
Location: Oliver Lee Memorial State Park Group Shelter

Description: Enjoy the beauty of Dog Canyon at sundown. Learn about celestial cycles and how early cultures used the night sky to time their daily lives. Join the Amateur Astronomers Group for a tour of the stars and constellations in the dark skies over Oliver Lee Memorial State Park. Hot beverages will be provided.

For information call:
5 7 5 - 4 3 7 - 8 2 8 4

http://www.astronomersgroup.org/

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