Lung cancer: A deadly diagnosis -- De...

Lung cancer: A deadly diagnosis -- Death and Dying, Florida Hos...

There are 16 comments on the Orlando Sentinel story from Mar 29, 2008, titled Lung cancer: A deadly diagnosis -- Death and Dying, Florida Hos.... In it, Orlando Sentinel reports that:

More Floridians will die of lung cancer this year than breast, prostate and colon cancers combined.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Orlando Sentinel.

Lorie

Cocoa, FL

#1 Apr 1, 2008
My mother died March 1, 2007 of lung cancer. She was 63. Her father, my grandfather, died of lung cancer in 1974 at the age of 62. He lived six months after diagnosis; his daughter, 18 months. So 30-plus years of cancer research only bought us 12 more months. Those months were precious to us, but it wasn't enough, not nearly enough. Usually the first question that I am asked after telling someone my mother died of lung cancer is: Did she smoke? And when I answer that she smoked cigarettes since she was a teenager, the person shrugs or nods as if to say: Well, you get what you deserve if you smoke. It makes me want to scream. Neither my mother nor my grandfather lived long enough to retire, and they were both good, hard-working souls who did not deserve to die such a horrible death. They both became addicted to tobacco back when the tobacco companies were still telling everyone that smoking is good for your health. My mother tried so many times and in so many ways to quit smoking without success, but she finally found a way to stop smoking forever in only 18 months: lung cancer.
OneVoice3

Winter Springs, FL

#3 Apr 2, 2008
So? If you smoke you pay the price - no one to blame but yourself and the cigarette company.
Sally

White House, TN

#4 Apr 2, 2008
My grandfather died of emphysema in 1972. We begged him to quit, but he couldn't after so many years. He would sit, barrel-chested from the disease, and cough violently until he could take another breath, then put the cigarette back into his mouth. It was pitiful, but we loved him very much and we and especially my grandmother suffered when he died. After I was married my husband and I watched helplessly as his father died a painful death from lung cancer. I vowed I would never touch a cigarette, and I was true to that vow until years later I found cigarettes in my teenage son's pockets. I'm dumbfounded as to why he would do this, even though neither my husband and I smoke. He never knew his great-grandfather and grandfather, though. Maybe if he had seen their disease things would be different. I hope he can find a way to quit before I have to watch another loved one die.
James

Orlando, FL

#5 Apr 2, 2008
I have had 4 close relatives die from smoking related lung cancer in the past 3 years. 58, 60, 61 and 67 yrs old. One of them even said,'I knew this would happen'. The article is accurate, medicine still struggles with this cancer. It was such a painful process to watch my uncle practically decay over a year even with chemotherapy.
ocopek

Orlando, FL

#6 Apr 2, 2008
All my grandparents lived well past 80 years old. They didn't smoke.
My father and most of my aunts and uncles smoked. Most of them died before 70 and not just from lung cancer. Smoking is also bad for your heart. Just ask any doctor.
We are all quick to blame the tobacco companies, but my father started smoking during WWII because of dumb rules. The sailors would get "smoke breaks". If you didn't smoke, you didn't get a break. So my father started smoking and was addicted.
JGJ

Melbourne, FL

#7 Apr 2, 2008
Lorie wrote:
My mother died March 1, 2007 of lung cancer. She was 63. Her father, my grandfather, died of lung cancer in 1974 at the age of 62. He lived six months after diagnosis; his daughter, 18 months. So 30-plus years of cancer research only bought us 12 more months. Those months were precious to us, but it wasn't enough, not nearly enough. Usually the first question that I am asked after telling someone my mother died of lung cancer is: Did she smoke? And when I answer that she smoked cigarettes since she was a teenager, the person shrugs or nods as if to say: Well, you get what you deserve if you smoke. It makes me want to scream. Neither my mother nor my grandfather lived long enough to retire, and they were both good, hard-working souls who did not deserve to die such a horrible death. They both became addicted to tobacco back when the tobacco companies were still telling everyone that smoking is good for your health. My mother tried so many times and in so many ways to quit smoking without success, but she finally found a way to stop smoking forever in only 18 months: lung cancer.
My mother died of Lung Cancer on Sept. 27th, 2004. I was only 24; my life has not been the same since she passed.
I emphathize with you and your loss; I understand 100% what you are going through. You never fully heal from losing a parent...
Geminate

Laguna Niguel, CA

#8 Apr 3, 2008
You all seem to be in the dark concerning types of smokers. There are tobacco smokers and users that do not inhale smoke into their lungs. Then there are those cigarette smokers, most of which do inhale smoke into their lungs inviting lung cancer. Almost all pipe and cigar smokers don’t inhale smoke into their lungs, since there are no taste buds in the lungs, and smoking a pipe or cigars is not about getting a nicotine fix, it’s about taste. Smoking a pipe or cigars is as harmless as drinking a cup of tea. Then of course there are the tobacco chewers and sniffers; since direct and prolonged contact with a tobacco product is required, this activity can cause cancer. If anyone is going to get even with the system, deservedly so, it should be pipe and cigar smokers, since they practice safe smoking and do not get cancer.
ocopek

Orlando, FL

#9 Apr 7, 2008
Geminate wrote:
...pipe and cigar smokers, since they practice safe smoking and do not get cancer.
Do an Internet search for pipe smoking and cancer...

"Decades ago, doctors began to notice high rates of tongue cancer in pipe smokers"

"Even if smokers don't inhale they are breathing the smoke as secondhand smoke and are still at risk for lung cancer. Pipe and cigar smokers, who often don’t inhale, are at an increased risk for lip, mouth, tongue, and some other cancers"

"Current pipe smoking was associated with an increased risk of six out of the nine cancers— colon/rectum, esophagus, larynx, lung, oropharynx, and pancreas—and the three other diseases"
blindleadingtheb lind

Carrollton, TX

#10 Apr 9, 2008
Geminate wrote:
You all seem to be in the dark concerning types of smokers. There are tobacco smokers and users that do not inhale smoke into their lungs. Then there are those cigarette smokers, most of which do inhale smoke into their lungs inviting lung cancer. Almost all pipe and cigar smokers don’t inhale smoke into their lungs, since there are no taste buds in the lungs, and smoking a pipe or cigars is not about getting a nicotine fix, it’s about taste. Smoking a pipe or cigars is as harmless as drinking a cup of tea. Then of course there are the tobacco chewers and sniffers; since direct and prolonged contact with a tobacco product is required, this activity can cause cancer. If anyone is going to get even with the system, deservedly so, it should be pipe and cigar smokers, since they practice safe smoking and do not get cancer.
What make believe world do you live in? Pipe and cigar smokers do most certainly get cancer. They get all sorts of mouth cancers which can develop and be just as deadly as any other cancer.

And to all of you people pointing fingers and saying smokers deserve what they get....I surely hope that you live a perfect healthy life. That you are not overweight, drink too many chemical laden beverages, work with with chemicals in your job, breathe the air in the city, eat fish out of the local lakes and on and on. People develop cancer for all sorts of habits and lifestyles...does that make a smoker's life any less valuable? I by the way am not a smoker, but feel for anyone that struggles with an addiction.
news junkie

United States

#11 Apr 10, 2008
Good article on subject, but the real reason why most people will die is because of health insurance and the road blocks put up. The long wait for getting an appointment, the blood results they lost, the professional detatchment, the people who are dropped from coverage, the people who are declined authorizations, the people who can't afford coverage and so on.
Grammy

Ocoee, FL

#12 Apr 15, 2008
Lorie wrote:
My mother died March 1, 2007 of lung cancer. She was 63. Her father, my grandfather, died of lung cancer in 1974 at the age of 62. He lived six months after diagnosis; his daughter, 18 months. So 30-plus years of cancer research only bought us 12 more months. Those months were precious to us, but it wasn't enough, not nearly enough. Usually the first question that I am asked after telling someone my mother died of lung cancer is: Did she smoke? And when I answer that she smoked cigarettes since she was a teenager, the person shrugs or nods as if to say: Well, you get what you deserve if you smoke. It makes me want to scream. Neither my mother nor my grandfather lived long enough to retire, and they were both good, hard-working souls who did not deserve to die such a horrible death. They both became addicted to tobacco back when the tobacco companies were still telling everyone that smoking is good for your health. My mother tried so many times and in so many ways to quit smoking without success, but she finally found a way to stop smoking forever in only 18 months: lung cancer.
My 44 year old brother died of lung cancer on November 22, 2007, just 4 months after diagnosis. He had quit smoking 10 years earlier, but apparently the damage was done. I empathize with you. I also agree with the stigma attached "he smoked therefore he deserved it". For all out there who believe this are just ignorant and have never lost a love one this way. At the end of the day, what matters most is that my brother was one of the most kindest, caring, decent human beings ever and he nor his family deserved this blow.
duane

Chiefland, FL

#13 May 14, 2009
does anybody know any thing about lung cancer
jjr2011

San Francisco, CA

#15 Oct 26, 2011
Mom just diagnosed stage 3 lung cancer. She is 77 and smoked for 45 years starting in teens. Remember smoking was an encouraged, socially acceptable norm when she started. No doubt she should have never started and quit sooner then she did, but our ridiculous society that allows this deadly product to be sold is partly to blame. Please US government ban tobacco!!!!!!!!!
Tired of Silly

United States

#16 Oct 27, 2011
Everybody dies of something. Alcohol is much more deadly (and harms people in many more ways) than tobacco. There are lots worse ways to go than lung cancer.
Tex Waterway

Spring, TX

#18 Aug 16, 2013
You're a true idiot, Silly. I hope you smoke and drink yourself into ruin soon. Goodness knows you already ate yourself into illness. Why not finish the job?
Truluck

Spring, TX

#19 Mar 21, 2015
Obviously not an Oncology nurse/worker. I have so much respect for the people who work with patients going through radiation, chemo, surgery and other cancer treatments.

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