E Vey

Longwood, FL

#21 Oct 17, 2007
Gary wrote:
<quoted text>
You're either stupid, ignorant of the history of this craft, or choose to swallow the official story.
You are not my problem and I'm glad I don't now you... see ya.
You have a problem, but I'm not it. If The Sentinel had not asked for these documents, how would you even know they blamed the pilot? Did you have access to the classified documents that the rest of us didn't?

I'm trying to figure out what you think The Sentinel should have done. Asked for the documents, then not print them?
Linda Voll

Tallahassee, FL

#22 Oct 22, 2007
Mike Linquist wrote:
<quoted text>
Ms. Woodruffe, I read your comments with interest. My grandfather was Col. Mike McCoy. My mother is Pam Linquist (formerly Pamela A. McCoy) and she still lives in Tampa, FL. I live 25 miles north in Wesley Chapel, FL. We attended the dedication of McCoy Elementary in Orlando last year n Veterans' Day. It was nice to discover someone like you who was so close to the tragic event that happened. Please feel free to get in touch.
Mike Linquist e-mail mikelinquist8@aol.com
I attended McCoy Elementary. I vividly remember the portrait of your Grandfather in the school lobby. I know the old building is gone, but I hope they put the portrait in another place of prominence. Sir, Col. mcCoy was atrue hero in my book.
Eric Linquist

Winter Haven, FL

#23 Oct 31, 2007
Colonel Michael Norman Wright McCoy was my grandfather as well. I’m Eric Linquist, the younger brother of previous poster Michael Linquist and I have been an Orlando resident since 1986. Unfortunately, Grandaddy Mike perished a year before I was born so I never got to be a grandson to him. Our still younger brother Marc is in the same boat.
It stretches my sensibilities to chalk up such a horrible accident to “hot-dogging” or “pilot error” for a man who was arguably one of the finest US pilots at the time with an unparalleled repertoire of flying experience. How does a man with 20,000 flying hours in the cockpit “hotdog” anything? That McCoy had the ability and presence of mind to coax a craft that had degraded into a crippled fireball away from populated areas is self-evident testimony to his valor and heroism. Declarations to the contrary just don’t fly.
Furthermore, in consideration of the inaction and complacency regarding the horrible ongoing death toll of the B-47, I also believe that Mrs. Woodroffe’s laser-like focus is just. A sweeping investigation into the B-47’s death toll would almost certainly have grounded the fleet, an outcome the military could ill afford, while any government retooling of the truth would likely be devoid of earnest scrutiny in 1957.
Coupled with John C. Evans’ competent assessment of craft damage and historical data, there seems to be much in the way of evidence to suggest the B-47 was fraught with design flaws. Certainly the families associated with the 464 other victims of the B-47, fallen heroes all, would agree in kind.
Colonel Michael Norman Wright McCoy earned his wings.
The real McCoy was a real Hero.
Respectfully,
Eric Linquist
jetmail17@yahoo.com
Eric Linquist

Winter Haven, FL

#24 Oct 31, 2007
Colonel Michael Norman Wright McCoy was my grandfather as well. I’m Eric Linquist, the younger brother of previous poster Michael Linquist and I have been an Orlando resident since 1986. Unfortunately, Grandaddy Mike perished a year before I was born so I never got to be a grandson to him. Our still younger brother Marc is in the same boat.

It stretches my sensibilities to chalk up such a horrible accident to “hot-dogging” or “pilot error” for a man who was arguably one of the finest US pilots at the time with an unparalleled repertoire of flying experience. How does a man with 20,000 flying hours in the cockpit “hotdog” anything? That McCoy had the ability and presence of mind to coax a craft that had degraded into a crippled fireball away from populated areas is self-evident testimony to his valor and heroism. Declarations to the contrary don’t fly.

Furthermore, in consideration of the inaction and complacency regarding the horrible ongoing death toll of the B-47, I also believe that Mrs. Woodroffe’s laser-like focus is just. A sweeping investigation into the B-47’s death toll would almost certainly have grounded the fleet, an outcome the military could ill afford, while any government retooling of the truth would likely be devoid of earnest scrutiny in 1957.

Coupled with John C. Evans’ competent assessment of craft damage and historical data, there seems to be much in the way of evidence to suggest the B-47 was fraught with design flaws. Certainly the families associated with the 464 other victims of the B-47, fallen heroes all, would agree in kind.

Colonel Michael Norman Wright McCoy earned his wings.

The real McCoy was a real Hero.

Respectfully,

Eric Linquist
jetmail17@yahoo.com
John C Evans Tempe AZ

Phoenix, AZ

#25 Nov 7, 2007
Since my previous posts Kevin Spear and I have exchanged several email about questions generated by my posts, and his contact with B47 pilots. My impression OK Kevin is that he really wants to know the truth as closely as can be determined after 50 years. As a B47 ground crew member I believe in the truth about the aircraft and those who lost their lives in them. My comments were based on finding the truth, not guilt or innocence that serves no purpose. Like it or not, Col. McCoy was a accomplished aviator who like many before him has moved into history. All of the pilots I have known like police officers want to go home after the end of their shift. Sometimes through no fault of their own do not.
Jim

United States

#26 Nov 8, 2007
Isn't it odd that the Air Force had operation Milk Bottle on the B-47's after McCoy's?
Frank Mirande

Tazewell, TN

#27 Nov 13, 2007
Collegedale TN

Every kid growing up in the Orlando area in the late-1950's and 1960's with even a passing interest in the "airbase to the south" heard the story of its legendary namesake. Col. McCoy's accident occurred when I was 3 years old, just about the time my lifelong interest in aviation began. We lived near Orlando Municipal Airport (later Herndon and now Orlando Executive) and I was treated to the takeoffs and landings of the big propeller airliners of the day: DC-6's and -7's, Constellations, and others (airline traffic didn't move to McCoy (co-located with the Air Force) until 1963). But it was the more distant military traffic that really caught my attention, which was the B-47's of the 321st Bomb. Wing coming and going from McCoy, high over Lake Underhill. My childhood and adolescence progressed against a backdrop of change; the B-47's made way in 1961 for the B-52's of what soon became the 306th B.W. which for over 11 years became such a fixture in the Orlando skies, but in 1975 (the planes had all left by Oct. 1973), McCoy finally closed. I later moved away from Orlando for college and grad. school, ending up as an artist/illustrator at Lockheed Georgia in Marietta, where I was employed for 16 years.
I mention the background information in order to demonstrate my personal interest in the event and to lend validity to the position I take regarding the issues raised in this discussion. As some have said, I believe Mr. Spear has provided his readers a service by bringing to light the particulars of the de-classified accident report. He promotes a general impression of appreciation for the efforts of Col. McCoy and his colleagues, which I think is quite fair. However, when he states that they were forced to fly a "dangerous" aircraft-the B-47- I believe he loses credibility.
The B-47 flew as long ago as 1947, and at that time it was considered revolutionary. In hindsight, it was at least that, for its basic configuration supplied the basis for all subsequent large Boeing aircraft such as the B-52, 707, 747, etc. After a rigorous test program lasting 4 years, the first operational B-47 was delivered to the Air Force (actually by Col. McCoy to his old command: The 306th B.W. at MacDill AFB- the plane was nicknamed "The Real McCoy"). This aircraft took its place in the USAF inventory as a combat-ready machine-not inherently a "dangerous" one-with known limitations that had to be respected, some of which were referred to in the article in sometimes lurid fashion. Some 2,000 B-47's were produced- contrast this with 744 B-52's, 100 B-1B's, and 21 B-2's. This translated to a vast number of aircraft accumulating a huge amount of flying time, because of the nature of its mission. In such an enormous operation, the opportunities for accidents are great, and both the 20 losses quoted for 1957, and the human cost over the aircraft's service life appear dreadful, if viewed in isolation (certainly they were to those involved). But in the context of the experience of other successful aircraft designs, these losses- as unfortunate as they were- were not considered prohibitive. The B-52, for example, incurred 8 losses the next year (1958), and, in fact suffered the great majority of its almost 100 major accidents in its intial ten years of service.
I don't claim any great expertise in the highly specialized subject of military aircraft operation and accidents, but I became familiar with it over my years of study and involvement in the industry. Certainly, it does not lend itself to superficial research, for that inevitably results in misleading conclusions. Having once been an industry professional and always a student of history, I can say that the manufacturers and their Air Force counterparts lived up to their obligation to ensure that aircrews flew reliable aircraft.
Don

Jacksonville, FL

#28 Dec 14, 2007
I was in school at Robert E. Lee Jr. Hi when the plane went over our school and crashed in a field at Ben White Raceway. We always thought the pilot was a hero.
Bev

Kissimmee, FL

#29 Dec 22, 2007
I was also a student at Robert E. Lee Jr. High School at the time of the Col. McCoy crash. We were in Geography class in the portables along the athletic field when there was a hugh roaring sound. Our teacher( Ms Tucker?) yelled for all of us to "get out of the building". I think she thought it was a tornado. When we got outside there were many, many students and teachers that had also evacuated their buildings and were lining the play field. When we looked up the hugh plane was right there on top of us. It almost looked like the plane was going to land on the field but at the last moment Col. McCoy pulled the nose up and he skipped over the field and houses to the west. Then we saw a hugh explosion and smoke. At the time I thought it hit Lake Silver Elem. School were my brother was a student and was very upset until my mother came to my school with my brother. We then drove out to the crash site by the canning company on 17-92. I remember there was debries all over the road with one of the engines in the middle of the road and out in the cow pasture across the street. The police made us turn around at that point.
I really think Col. McCoy saved our lives because it was very apparent that he pulled the nose of the plane up when he saw all of us kids on that play field. He is my hero.
david head

Dallas, TX

#30 Jan 3, 2008
Col McCoy was a hero to be sure and a great pilot. His craft bit him just as a Pit Bull surely does its master eventually. The craft was flawed. Kevin Spears and John Evans are sincere and intelligent men. See the light people. God bless McCoy and his crew and families.
alan arthurs

Jersey, GA

#31 Jan 3, 2008
i'm sure col. mccoy was heroic on numerous flights-but he and the military were NOT that day. he and the british pilot were "swapping race cars" like little boys with OUR lives and tax dollars at stake. most civilians or soldiers do not realize what the pentagon is capable of.-and believe me, they would have censored this report longer if they could. stop acting like sheep.
david head

Dallas, TX

#32 Jan 4, 2008
Hi Alan, I am always interested in the truth, please offer more insight on your comments regarding "swapping race cars". I am ex military and realise what they and the governmment will do. Why were the JFK files sealed in 1963 until 2035?
alan arthurs wrote:
i'm sure col. mccoy was heroic on numerous flights-but he and the military were NOT that day. he and the british pilot were "swapping race cars" like little boys with OUR lives and tax dollars at stake. most civilians or soldiers do not realize what the pentagon is capable of.-and believe me, they would have censored this report longer if they could. stop acting like sheep.
alan arthurs

United States

#33 Jan 4, 2008
david head wrote:
Hi Alan, I am always interested in the truth, please offer more insight on your comments regarding "swapping race cars". I am ex military and realise what they and the governmment will do. Why were the JFK files sealed in 1963 until 2035?<quoted text>
read the sentinel story- the brit took col. mccoy for a ride in his vulcan(?), then mccoy took him in the B-47 out of deland FL air base.
Harv LaFollette

United States

#34 Jan 14, 2008
I flew the B-47 for 3 years. When Boeing designed the B-707 (America's first jet airliner), many of the B-47 design features were incorporated into the B-707. Every airplane ever built has had some problems. As a retired airline pilot, I can honestly say the intensive training we underwent to operate the B-47 went far beyond the training required to even fly commercial jet airliners today. Was Mike McCoy a hero? YOU BET HE WAS!

Harv LaFollette USAF ret.
Mike Capdeville

Long Beach, CA

#35 Feb 28, 2008
My brother, Jeff, who now lives in the Pensacola area, just sent a copy of this article to me and I am flabbergasted to be reading about all of this.
We, too, are grandsons of Col. McCoy. My mother was Barbara (McCoy) Capdeville and our grandmother was his first wife, Helen McCoy. She had two daughters by him, Barbara and Patricia. There are four of us grandchildren. Most of us live in Southern California, along with Col. McCoy's sister and brothers families.
The most ironic thing is that Grams passed away at the age of 98 just three months before Rose McCoy passed. They were married for eight years. My brother, Jeff was in the Marine Corps in the 1960's and took an R & R trip to McCoy Air Force base and was given a tour by the current Commander.
My fondest memories of him are when he visited us here in California in the early 50's after making a trip to Japan when we were really young and bringing us kimonos and watches made in Japan at the time. He has three distinct and unique families and it would be fun for us all to get acquainted some time. I will email Mike and Eric Lindquist soon and chat with them. What an incredible story all the way around! Colonel Michael N.W. McCoy was certainly our hero!

Since: Oct 07

Orlando

#36 Mar 1, 2008
Mike, Eric Linquist here. I continue to check this thread and just came across your fascinating post. I had located your grandmother (McCoy's first wife) Helen's name along with her two daughters, Patricia and Barbara (your mom) on Ancestry.com a few months ago but knew no way to get in contact. I have a younger brother, Marc, who lives in Los Angeles' Echo Park in your state! What an interesting turn of events! My grandmother Alyce, who passed in the nineties, was married to Michael McCoy for about 22 years. Would be great to compare notes!
Please feel free to send me an email at jetmail17@yahoo.com.
Carl J Mollnow

Tacoma, WA

#37 Mar 3, 2008
As a USAF Pilot 1961 I was assigned to McCoy AFB to fly B-47s. Enroute I was reassigned to Davis-Monthan AFB, Tucson , AZ much to my chagrin - I loved Florida and the great life I could see myself having on my very few days off each month.
With 4-years and 2,700+ hours in the B-47 I found it to be a very reliable, fast and great acft. to fly. One or more posts mentioned that the wings would bend severely at times. "Hello,???!!!" They were designed to do that and at 425 knots (488.75 mph) low level (500-1,000' AGL) this made for quite a nice ride ala shock-absorber motion. 30 knots or so faster the wing tips twisted a little an made the ailerons less effective - but it was easy to stay below that speed and fly safely. Like several posts(especially the B-47 mechanic - who by the way "they/he" did a fantastic job in keeping the B-47s in top-notch safe flying condition) the only real problems arose during component or system failures - which were few and far between in my B-47 experience 1961-1966. The biggest problems were crew navigation errors low level. Two occurred, 1 each at the 2 bases I flew out of. We did not have sophisticated navigation aids while flying with just a few hundred feet AGL (Above Ground Level) and those that did not have the Co-Pilot aiding the Navigator using a well set-up annotated low-level chart were usually/always the losers as were their families and loved ones.
I only lost 3 engines(mechanical engine failure) but were shut-down immediately before further destruction occurred.
Jet engines were new back than and one second they were humming like a top and a nano-second later they were coming apart and tearing up your airplane.
There is NOTHING Col. McCoy could have done to make the engine come apart no matter how he flew it to have it engulfed in flames as described in the posts or AR's. When something comes apart and you are now a flying torch and you stay with the aircraft to bring it down in an area of no human habitation.
- YOU ARE NOT ONLY A HERO - YOU ARE BRAVE BEYOND ANY MEASURE A HUMAN BEING CAN EVER BE! YOU KNOW THAT YOU ARE A DEAD PERSON - AS YOU ARE FLYING YOUR SOPHISTICATED MULITOV COCKTAIL AWAY FROM AND TO KEEP OTHER UNWITTING PERSONS, WHERE-EVER, FROM THE FATE YOU KNOW YOU ARE GOING TO RECEIVE.
ANY DOUBTERS ARE PURE IDIOTS AND HAVE NEVER FLOWN AN AIRCRAFT IN DISTRESS.
With over 22,000 hrs flying (most heavy jet) and having witnessed/been around many USAF accidents - the MAIN THING USAF COMMAND DOES IS ASSIGN BLAME IN PERCENTAGES(%).
WHEN THE CREW DIES IN THE ACCIDENT - THERE IS "NO SUPERVISORY ERROR" - IT IS ALWAYS "CREW/PILOT ERROR" AS THEY ARE NOT AROUND TO DEFEND THEMSELVES.
I have written many "USAF HAZARD REPORTS" AND EVERY ONE HAS LATER CAUSED MANY (KILLING THOUSANDS - BOTH CIVILIAN AND MILITARY - WORLDWIDE) ACCIDENTS.
ONE HAZARD REPORT I WROTE IN 1971 ON "ANTI-HIJACKING PROCEDURES" NOTED AN EXACT OCCURANCE OF A HIJACKED B747 THOUGH IN SEATTLE, WA. "NO-ONE WOULD DO THAT STORY BACK THEN EVEN "60 MINUTES" WHEN THEY DID A STORY ON ANOTHER OF MY "HAZARD REPORTS" WHERE THE C-141's WERE FLYING WITH "LESS THAN ATP”(Airline Transport Pilot) RATED PILOTS AND NOT PROPERLY TRAINED IN "TERPS" (Terminal Instrument Procedures) AND THUS CRASHED INTO THE MOUNTAINS AT NIGHT OUTSIDE SEATTLE.
THE FAA - NTSB - CONGRESS &/OR THE SENATE OR ADMINISTRATION CARED AND THUS 9/11 COULD HAVE BEEN AVOIDED SIMPLY BY GETTING THEIR HEADS OUT OF THEIR POSTERIOR OPENINGS.
Carl J Mollnow

Tacoma, WA

#38 Mar 3, 2008
As a USAF Pilot 1961 I was assigned to McCoy AFB to fly B-47s. Enroute I was reassigned to Davis-Monthan AFB, Tucson , AZ much to my chagrin - I loved Florida and the great life I could see myself having on my very few days off each month.
With 4-years and 2,700+ hours in the B-47 I found it to be a very reliable, fast and great acft. to fly. One or more posts mentioned that the wings would bend severely at times. "Hello,???!!!" They were designed to do that and at 425 knots (488.75 mph) low level (500-1,000' AGL) this made for quite a nice ride ala shock-absorber motion. 30 knots or so faster the wing tips twisted a little an made the ailerons less effective - but it was easy to stay below that speed and fly safely. Like several posts(especially the B-47 mechanic - who by the way "they/he" did a fantastic job in keeping the B-47s in top-notch safe flying condition) the only real problems arose during component or system failures - which were few and far between in my B-47 experience 1961-1966. The biggest problems were crew navigation errors low level. Two occurred, 1 each at the 2 bases I flew out of. We did not have sophisticated navigation aids while flying with just a few hundred feet AGL (Above Ground Level) and those that did not have the Co-Pilot aiding the Navigator using a well set-up annotated low-level chart were usually/always the losers as were their families and loved ones.
I only lost 3 engines(mechanical engine failure) but were shut-down immediately before further destruction occurred.
Jet engines were new back than and one second they were humming like a top and a nano-second later they were coming apart and tearing up your airplane.
There is NOTHING Col. McCoy could have done to make the engine come apart no matter how he flew it to have it engulfed in flames as described in the posts or AR's. When something comes apart and you are now a flying torch and you stay with the aircraft to bring it down in an area of no human habitation.
- YOU ARE NOT ONLY A HERO - YOU ARE BRAVE BEYOND ANY MEASURE A HUMAN BEING CAN EVER BE! YOU KNOW THAT YOU ARE A DEAD PERSON - AS YOU ARE FLYING YOUR SOPHISTICATED MULITOV COCKTAIL AWAY FROM AND TO KEEP OTHER UNWITTING PERSONS, WHERE-EVER, FROM THE FATE YOU KNOW YOU ARE GOING TO RECEIVE.
ANY DOUBTERS ARE PURE IDIOTS AND HAVE NEVER FLOWN AN AIRCRAFT IN DISTRESS.
With over 22,000 hrs flying (most heavy jet) and having witnessed/been around many USAF accidents - the MAIN THING USAF COMMAND DOES IS ASSIGN BLAME IN PERCENTAGES(%).
WHEN THE CREW DIES IN THE ACCIDENT - THERE IS "NO SUPERVISORY ERROR" - IT IS ALWAYS "CREW/PILOT ERROR" AS THEY ARE NOT AROUND TO DEFEND THEMSELVES.
I have written many "USAF HAZARD REPORTS" AND EVERY ONE HAS LATER CAUSED MANY (KILLING THOUSANDS - BOTH CIVILIAN AND MILITARY - WORLDWIDE) ACCIDENTS.
ONE HAZARD REPORT I WROTE IN 1971 ON "ANTI-HIJACKING PROCEDURES" NOTED AN EXACT OCCURANCE OF A HIJACKED B747 THOUGH IN SEATTLE, WA. "NO-ONE WOULD DO THAT STORY BACK THEN EVEN "60 MINUTES" WHEN THEY DID A STORY ON ANOTHER OF MY "HAZARD REPORTS" WHERE THE C-141's WERE FLYING WITH "LESS THAN ATP”(Airline Transport Pilot) RATED PILOTS AND NOT PROPERLY TRAINED IN "TERPS" (Terminal Instrument Procedures) AND THUS CRASHED INTO THE MOUNTAINS AT NIGHT OUTSIDE SEATTLE.
THE FAA - NTSB - CONGRESS &/OR THE SENATE OR ADMINISTRATION CARED AND THUS 9/11 COULD HAVE BEEN AVOIDED SIMPLY BY GETTING THEIR HEADS OUT OF THEIR POSTERIOR OPENINGS.
Carl J Mollnow

Tacoma, WA

#39 Mar 3, 2008
CONTINUED

THUS COL. MIKE McCoy, USAF COMMAND PILOT, HAS BEEN SLIGHTED THOUGH NO REAL "LAWYER" HAS BEEN APPOINTED TO DEFEND HIS/THE REAL OPERATIONS OCCURING IN THE COCKPIT OF THE B-47 THAT DAY SO MANY YEARS AGO
AND THE HUMANS (MANY WHICH HAVE IN THESE POSTS SO NICELY HAVE GIVEN COL. MIKE HIS DUE PRAISES OF HEROISM) "OVER" WHICH THE BURNING B-47 INFERNO PASSED AND DID NOT HARM EVEN A HAIR ON THIR HEADS. COL. MIKE McCOY, I SALUTE YOU !
THE HERO THAT YOU ARE - NO ONE CAN TAKE AWAY. A FELLOW B-47 PILOT.
Carl J. Mollnow
Tacoma, WA 98467
cmollnow741@comcast.net
Margaritanlime

Orlando, FL

#40 Mar 3, 2008
Carl J Mollnow wrote:
CONTINUED
THUS COL. MIKE McCoy, USAF COMMAND PILOT, HAS BEEN SLIGHTED THOUGH NO REAL "LAWYER" HAS BEEN APPOINTED TO DEFEND HIS/THE REAL OPERATIONS OCCURING IN THE COCKPIT OF THE B-47 THAT DAY SO MANY YEARS AGO
AND THE HUMANS (MANY WHICH HAVE IN THESE POSTS SO NICELY HAVE GIVEN COL. MIKE HIS DUE PRAISES OF HEROISM) "OVER" WHICH THE BURNING B-47 INFERNO PASSED AND DID NOT HARM EVEN A HAIR ON THIR HEADS. COL. MIKE McCOY, I SALUTE YOU !
THE HERO THAT YOU ARE - NO ONE CAN TAKE AWAY. A FELLOW B-47 PILOT.
Carl J. Mollnow
Tacoma, WA 98467
cmollnow741@comcast.net
He is still seen as a hero here.

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