Kids' summer feeding programs see soa...

Kids' summer feeding programs see soaring demand

There are 24 comments on the Orlando Sentinel story from Jun 15, 2009, titled Kids' summer feeding programs see soaring demand. In it, Orlando Sentinel reports that:

Curtis Bellesman, 6, slurps up spaghetti and meatballs for lunch recently at Sister-to-Sister Outreach Center in the Ivey Lane area of Orlando.

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Level 1

Since: Nov 07

Winter Park, FL

#30 Jun 18, 2009
Patriot wrote:
<quoted text>
The question is, how best to help the children become productive members of society? You seem to think starving them is the answer (or maybe forced child labor?) I think its silly to complain if nonprofits want to feed the kids lunch. If you don't like it, don't donate to the sister-to-sister foundation. Something tells me you already don't.
Also, federal welfare benefits are limited by law to a maximum of five years. Five years is nothing to sneeze at, but it will hardly see these kids to adulthood. And in this economy, many jobs are evaporating and leaving families with few to no options, which is why there is an increased demand for services this summer. In other words, increased demand signals a SHORT term need; if this were solely a long-term, endemic problem, demand would remain the same from summer to summer.
All of these facts mitigate against your assumption that these kids are a LONG term burden on your wallet.
Did you even read the article?

The article clearly states this is a federally funded program.

Did you just miss the part that says, "Sister-to-Sister, is one of 201 sites in Orange County participating in the federally funded Summer Food Service Program".

Or the other part that says, "The food bank gets reimbursed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture at about $3 per lunch."

Many kids would love to be doing something constructive to help their families and neighborhood so I would hardly call it forced labor.

What would you have them do, go home and watch TV or play Xbox?

You apparently have all the answers but all I've heard so far is give them free food.
pat

AOL

#31 Jun 19, 2009
Patriot wrote:
What makes you so sure all these kids were "born into poverty"? In today's economy, anyone can suddenly be poor. Or maybe you'd rather that their parents killed the kids, like what happened in Oviedo, so that there would be no burden on taxpayers?
As a taxpayer myself, I'd rather pay for lunches than ER visits, police visits, court appointments, or jail time.
patriot, great post!!! i'm with you. children are fed at the park near me & it makes my heart feel good. the servers even play with the children after they eat as i'm sure their parents are working. this has been going on for the last 3 years so i think it's a great thing our town is doing. no child should go hungry.
Patriot

Monroe, LA

#32 Jun 19, 2009
You are a moron wrote:
<quoted text>
Did you even read the article?
The article clearly states this is a federally funded program.
Did you just miss the part that says, "Sister-to-Sister, is one of 201 sites in Orange County participating in the federally funded Summer Food Service Program".
Or the other part that says, "The food bank gets reimbursed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture at about $3 per lunch."
Many kids would love to be doing something constructive to help their families and neighborhood so I would hardly call it forced labor.
What would you have them do, go home and watch TV or play Xbox?
You apparently have all the answers but all I've heard so far is give them free food.
You're right. I had been googling Sister to Sister (out of curiosity) and wasn't thinking about the federal funding reported in the article when I wrote back to you. Sorry about that.

I'm ok with federally funded programs, though. I get what you're saying about the cycle of poverty and parents who don't take responsibility for their kids, and I agree with you to some extent, but I am ok with feeding kids lunch. From my perspective, we should do what we can to keep kids from growing up hungry because it's the right thing to do. So I don't mind my tax dollars going to summer food programs.

I wouldn't object to these groups asking the kids to do a small job (e.g., pick up litter or sweep or whatever) but I don't think that young kids should be required to work for food.

I recognize that I won't change your mind.:) You do have a good point, I just don't entirely agree.
Weird Science

Spring, TX

#36 Jul 3, 2013
We don't have summer feeding programs through schools because there is
1% economically disadvantaged and thus are not needed. The median income is a six figure income. The churches donate to food pantries for areas north and south, but it's not like it is great food. Store brand everything according to an senior citizen person I interviewed. People think people on public assistance live high on the hog. They should try living on $72.00 a month for groceries for a senior citizen. That's a little over $2.00 a day.

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