Nurse accused of stealing pain medication

Full story: The Morning Call

A registered nurse was charged Friday with stealing narcotics from the nursing home where she worked, after her cover-up story failed because she said she dispensed some of the drugs to a dead person, ...

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“LEST WE FORGET...”

Since: Apr 09

MT DORA FL

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#64
Sep 25, 2012
 
Nurse Judy wrote:
This woman is just nuts, forget addict, she's bipolar amongst other things. The mere fact that she was once in the presence of patients is disturbing. And her husband who supports her 100% in also in rehab
Are you saying, or implying, that those with bipolar disorder cannot be good nurses?
Not prosecuted

Asheboro, NC

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#65
Oct 22, 2012
 
Read the accsations on the website California Board of Nurse
www.rn.ca.gov/public/rn509848.pdf
Accusations made by Ruth Ann Terry a former executve of the Board.
Notice the years that passed as Andrea Korpi contnued to steal drugs from the patients. Notice that she was confronted in 2001 and Andrea Korpi admitted to stealing the drugs and using them herself. There was no prosecution and in 2003 Andrea Korpi was still stealing drugs. No prosecution.
In 2006 The California Board Of Nurses revoked her license but there was never any prosecution for the crime
Andrea Korpi somewhere during that time moved to North Carolina and is now caring for an elderly lady with a memory loss disease
Andrea's husband on August 30 2012 was arrested for DWI and driving with his driver's license revoked and no insurace on the car. The revoked license seems to be from previous DWI's.which he had in the past. Andrea Korpi was also stopped in two counties for driving the vehicle without insurane.

“Yes I did get a makeover...”

Since: Jan 12

Swinging Vine, Georgia

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#66
Oct 22, 2012
 
Not prosecuted wrote:
Read the accsations on the website California Board of Nurse
www.rn.ca.gov/public/rn509848.pdf
Accusations made by Ruth Ann Terry a former executve of the Board.
Notice the years that passed as Andrea Korpi contnued to steal drugs from the patients. Notice that she was confronted in 2001 and Andrea Korpi admitted to stealing the drugs and using them herself. There was no prosecution and in 2003 Andrea Korpi was still stealing drugs. No prosecution.
In 2006 The California Board Of Nurses revoked her license but there was never any prosecution for the crime
Andrea Korpi somewhere during that time moved to North Carolina and is now caring for an elderly lady with a memory loss disease
Andrea's husband on August 30 2012 was arrested for DWI and driving with his driver's license revoked and no insurace on the car. The revoked license seems to be from previous DWI's.which he had in the past. Andrea Korpi was also stopped in two counties for driving the vehicle without insurane.
Very interesting~~
Thanks for posting this for all to read.
It's become easy for someone like this to up and move, start flying under the radar by taking a job in a rural town or area
in a nursing home.
Then, once in, she's in business, like taking candy from a baby.
And a paycheck to boot...
Not prosecuted

Asheboro, NC

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#67
Oct 22, 2012
 

Judged:

1

rubygoober wrote:
<quoted text>
Very interesting~~
Thanks for posting this for all to read.
It's become easy for someone like this to up and move, start flying under the radar by taking a job in a rural town or area
in a nursing home.
Then, once in, she's in business, like taking candy from a baby.
And a paycheck to boot...
Thanks
My main concern is that Andrea Korpi stole drugs for years and was not prosecuted. I think she should have been prosecuted more in 1997 when she was arrested for drinking in public and marijuana was found in her car and she was not arrested for this on drinking in public. The California Board of Nurses done nothing at that time. It took until 2006 and finally her license was revoked but she was never prosecuted.

I found some articles on scandles of nurses in California where Arnold Schwarzenegger then governor was involved in a nurses scandle there. Don't know exactly what that was may be worth finding.
Not Prosecuted

Winston Salem, NC

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#70
Nov 11, 2012
 
Not prosecuted wrote:
Read the accsations on the website California Board of Nurse
www.rn.ca.gov/public/rn509848.pdf
Accusations made by Ruth Ann Terry a former executve of the Board.
Notice the years that passed as Andrea Korpi contnued to steal drugs from the patients. Notice that she was confronted in 2001 and Andrea Korpi admitted to stealing the drugs and using them herself. There was no prosecution and in 2003 Andrea Korpi was still stealing drugs. No prosecution.
In 2006 The California Board Of Nurses revoked her license but there was never any prosecution for the crime
Andrea Korpi somewhere during that time moved to North Carolina and is now caring for an elderly lady with a memory loss disease
Andrea's husband on August 30 2012 was arrested for DWI and driving with his driver's license revoked and no insurace on the car. The revoked license seems to be from previous DWI's.which he had in the past. Andrea Korpi was also stopped in two counties for driving the vehicle without insurane.
All the Id's and a.k.a.s listed in the accusations made by the California Board of nurses against that Andrea matches the NC Andrea perfectly. So it seems these are the same person unless some other Andrea has all the a.k.a.'s listed in the accusations. I believe these to be the same person considering the perfect matches.

“Yes I did get a makeover...”

Since: Jan 12

Swinging Vine, Georgia

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#71
Nov 11, 2012
 
What's really scary about this sort of thing is,
There are plenty more out there doing the same thing, and for now getting away with it.
tired of silly

Tavares, FL

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#72
Nov 12, 2012
 
rubygoober wrote:
What's really scary about this sort of thing is,
There are plenty more out there doing the same thing, and for now getting away with it.
The number of nurses who abuse drugs is a very small percentage of all nurses. The number who use their patients as a source is even smaller. Physicians, nurses and other health care professionals are at increased risk for substance abuse, not because of proximity to medications, but because of the stress of their jobs. Like police officers, medical professionals are expected to NEVER make a mistake. I wonder how many of you would like to work under that pressure? In recent years, medical professionals are increasingly verbally and physically abused by patients as well. Shootings in hospitals are on the rise. About a year ago, there was a shooting at a hospital where I used to work up north. One person was killed, five (I think) injured, some very seriously. Little publicity was out there about it because it was a patient who did the shooting. Yes, there are bad apples in the nursing barrel, just as there are in any profession. But to say that "plenty more" are out there doing the same thing is to wrongfully accuse the vast majority of nurses who work harder than you would want to, for less money, and in whose hands your life is held more often than you know. If you think a physician "saved your life", you're probably wrong. It was likely a nurse who pointed out the symptoms or issues to that physician, and without that nurse, you would have died. <stepping off my soapbox>

“Yes I did get a makeover...”

Since: Jan 12

Swinging Vine, Georgia

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#73
Nov 12, 2012
 
tired of silly wrote:
<quoted text>
The number of nurses who abuse drugs is a very small percentage of all nurses. The number who use their patients as a source is even smaller. Physicians, nurses and other health care professionals are at increased risk for substance abuse, not because of proximity to medications, but because of the stress of their jobs. Like police officers, medical professionals are expected to NEVER make a mistake. I wonder how many of you would like to work under that pressure? In recent years, medical professionals are increasingly verbally and physically abused by patients as well. Shootings in hospitals are on the rise. About a year ago, there was a shooting at a hospital where I used to work up north. One person was killed, five (I think) injured, some very seriously. Little publicity was out there about it because it was a patient who did the shooting. Yes, there are bad apples in the nursing barrel, just as there are in any profession. But to say that "plenty more" are out there doing the same thing is to wrongfully accuse the vast majority of nurses who work harder than you would want to, for less money, and in whose hands your life is held more often than you know. If you think a physician "saved your life", you're probably wrong. It was likely a nurse who pointed out the symptoms or issues to that physician, and without that nurse, you would have died. <stepping off my soapbox>
TOS~~
I'm not offended at all by your post, it's informative and right on.
After thinking about it, what is expected of an RN or specialist nurse today, used to be the job of the doctor, period.
Many things change and not all of them for the better.
I also realize how hard it is for nursing homes to hire and keep
help. Florida probably being near the top of the ladder.
That was my point, the desperation of help needed, where a thorough background check might not be done.
BGC

Level 9

Since: Sep 11

Weeki Wachee, Florida

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#74
Nov 12, 2012
 
When I was five months pregnant with my daughter, smoking was still allowed in patient rooms in the hospital I worked in. An alcoholic in DT's tried to burn me with a cigarette in the stomach. He burned through two layers of clothing. I've been punched in the face for taking a blood pressure and another old gomer tried to cut me with a broken mirror. After being kicked, slapped, punched and burned, I can honestly say that I wouldn't want to work as nurse again. You compound that with insuffient staff per patient ratio and hospital politics and it's no surprise that fewer are going into healthcare.

But, there is no excuse for an abuser to just keep getting away with stealing drus. Her addiction will eventually cause someone's death, if it hasn't already.
tired of silly

Tavares, FL

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#75
Nov 12, 2012
 
rubygoober wrote:
<quoted text>
TOS~~
I'm not offended at all by your post, it's informative and right on.
After thinking about it, what is expected of an RN or specialist nurse today, used to be the job of the doctor, period.
Many things change and not all of them for the better.
I also realize how hard it is for nursing homes to hire and keep
help. Florida probably being near the top of the ladder.
That was my point, the desperation of help needed, where a thorough background check might not be done.
BGC
Nursing homes are the pits. If there is any way to keep your loved one out of them, do so. A hundred years ago I started my career as an aide in a nursing home. Understaffing is the norm for all disciplines, and that has not changed over the years. The other thing that has stayed the same is that long term care does not attract the highest quality of nurses. Many of them are older, burnt out, and looking for something "easy" to finish out their years til retirement. I returned to that nursing home as an RN for a brief period while I was working on my Bachelor's, and I can tell you that being a nurse in a nursing home requires very little critical thinking or even current clinical knowledge. Pushing that med cart and popping pills out of a blister pack is mindless task-oriented work....NOT what young, enthusiastic, bright nurses want to do. That all being said, there is NO excuse for a facility not doing a thorough background check, and in fact it is federal law that they do so. In a case like the one in question, the facility shoud be held liable along with the impaired nurse, IMO. Please don't misunderstand. I love nursing and am glad that I chose it as my profession. It has been good to me, allowing me flexibility in scheduling when my kids were young, a wide variety of experiences and practice settings, and the ability to have a "transportable" job when we decided to move to FL fifteen years ago. As I wind down to retirement, I sometimes miss direct patient contact but am greateful to be in charge of a wonderful team who provide quality care to dying patients. I'm very proud of my profession and what we do, and grateful to have done it for the last thirty years.

Level 9

Since: Sep 11

Weeki Wachee, Florida

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#76
Nov 12, 2012
 
tired of silly wrote:
<quoted text>
Nursing homes are the pits. If there is any way to keep your loved one out of them, do so. A hundred years ago I started my career as an aide in a nursing home. Understaffing is the norm for all disciplines, and that has not changed over the years. The other thing that has stayed the same is that long term care does not attract the highest quality of nurses. Many of them are older, burnt out, and looking for something "easy" to finish out their years til retirement. I returned to that nursing home as an RN for a brief period while I was working on my Bachelor's, and I can tell you that being a nurse in a nursing home requires very little critical thinking or even current clinical knowledge. Pushing that med cart and popping pills out of a blister pack is mindless task-oriented work....NOT what young, enthusiastic, bright nurses want to do. That all being said, there is NO excuse for a facility not doing a thorough background check, and in fact it is federal law that they do so. In a case like the one in question, the facility shoud be held liable along with the impaired nurse, IMO. Please don't misunderstand. I love nursing and am glad that I chose it as my profession. It has been good to me, allowing me flexibility in scheduling when my kids were young, a wide variety of experiences and practice settings, and the ability to have a "transportable" job when we decided to move to FL fifteen years ago. As I wind down to retirement, I sometimes miss direct patient contact but am greateful to be in charge of a wonderful team who provide quality care to dying patients. I'm very proud of my profession and what we do, and grateful to have done it for the last thirty years.
I also worked in one. One Charge Nurse(me) and two aides for thirty seven patients.

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