Local investors in no mood to toast B...

Local investors in no mood to toast Bernie Madoff

There are 8 comments on the Orlando Sentinel story from Feb 11, 2009, titled Local investors in no mood to toast Bernie Madoff. In it, Orlando Sentinel reports that:

Harry Heller Falk was watching TV when he first saw the news about Bernard Madoff .

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Orlando Sentinel.

Enough already

Winter Haven, FL

#1 Feb 11, 2009
Here we go again. Screw the taxpayers. Madoff investors were not forced to invest with him or anyone else. These investors could have put this money in the bank. However, they chose the risk of investing this money in hope for a return. They lost. Federal lawmakers must not allow legislation to amend taxable income an additional 7 years. This would create a deficit that would have to be paid by other taxpayers. Already we see the "bailout mentality". This is what occurs when people are not held accountable for their actions. This is the moral hazard of bailouts. These "Madoff people" were greedy and lost. They are not entitled to US taxpayer money. Let them learn a lesson.
How sad

Fort Mill, SC

#2 Feb 11, 2009
It's all about the greed,people.Where does it end?Every time a fat lou or Bernie scams some greedy investors,Taxpayers pick up the tab.Why should we be punished for their foolishness?Enough is enough,where does it end?How sad!
How sad

Fort Mill, SC

#3 Feb 11, 2009
Poor Bernie!Everyone scammed wants their money back.Fat chance.You can bet he has a nice nest egg salted away,He is too smart .There is money hidden away no one will ever get.There are many places to hide money and there are many people willing to help him do it.No wonder he is smiling.Fat Lou Perlman is doing the same thing.Why do you think they stole the money,so they could laugh and give it back?The only certain thing about Ponzi is it can't go on forever.Sooner or later the cops are at the door.Nobody knows this more than them.
GGG

Winter Garden, FL

#4 Feb 11, 2009
"Enough Already" and "How Sad", this is not all about greed on the part of the investors. An investor intrigued with a steady 10% return should not be classified as "greedy." If anyone was "greedy" it was Madoff for profiting from a criminal operation.

To say that these investors gambled and "lost" is a pretty pathetic statement. This was what appeared to be a perfectly legitimate fund for many years that any one of us could have invested in had we come across it.

There is a big difference between someone losing money on a risky fund, say drilling for oil on Mars, and someone losing money on a criminal scheme.

Sure, the SEC can't possibly keep up with everything out there, but one should be able to reasonably expect that there would be some oversight from the SEC to ensure that a $50 BILLION dollar Ponzi scheme doesn't exist.

You know, I've come to the conclusion after reading comments like these that most people who jump to use a term like "greedy" for any person or entity interested in making money, are in fact just jealous. Yes, there is some big-time greed out there from unscrupulous people and corporations, no doubt. But don't go blaming someone who could be your next door neighbor for investing in a fund that you yourself may have invested in if you had some money.
Enough already

Winter Haven, FL

#5 Feb 11, 2009
GGG wrote:
"Enough Already" and "How Sad", this is not all about greed on the part of the investors. An investor intrigued with a steady 10% return should not be classified as "greedy." If anyone was "greedy" it was Madoff for profiting from a criminal operation.
To say that these investors gambled and "lost" is a pretty pathetic statement. This was what appeared to be a perfectly legitimate fund for many years that any one of us could have invested in had we come across it.
There is a big difference between someone losing money on a risky fund, say drilling for oil on Mars, and someone losing money on a criminal scheme.
Sure, the SEC can't possibly keep up with everything out there, but one should be able to reasonably expect that there would be some oversight from the SEC to ensure that a $50 BILLION dollar Ponzi scheme doesn't exist.
You know, I've come to the conclusion after reading comments like these that most people who jump to use a term like "greedy" for any person or entity interested in making money, are in fact just jealous. Yes, there is some big-time greed out there from unscrupulous people and corporations, no doubt. But don't go blaming someone who could be your next door neighbor for investing in a fund that you yourself may have invested in if you had some money.
Investing is gambling. You can keep your money in a bank. I do not want to pay more taxes because someone who gambled and lost now wants a tax adjustment.
GGG

Winter Garden, FL

#6 Feb 11, 2009
Enough already wrote:
<quoted text>
Investing is gambling. You can keep your money in a bank. I do not want to pay more taxes because someone who gambled and lost now wants a tax adjustment.
Whatever. If you save all your money in the bank, then it's YOU who will be looking for a bailout when you try to retire.
Rocky

Lakeland, FL

#7 Feb 11, 2009
Enough already wrote:
Here we go again.**** the taxpayers. Madoff investors were not forced to invest with him or anyone else. These investors could have put this money in the bank. However, they chose the risk of investing this money in hope for a return. They lost. Federal lawmakers must not allow legislation to amend taxable income an additional 7 years. This would create a deficit that would have to be paid by other taxpayers. Already we see the "bailout mentality". This is what occurs when people are not held accountable for their actions. This is the moral hazard of bailouts. These "Madoff people" were greedy and lost. They are not entitled to US taxpayer money. Let them learn a lesson.

You are a Idiot. That is my money. not yours. I paid taxes on fake income. I don't want a dime from you or anybody else. All I want is MY tax dollars back. That is not a bailout. Educate yourself before you respond.
Six Figures

Spring, TX

#8 Aug 18, 2013
Greed on the part of the investors got them into a bad place, but that doesn't make it right. Maddoff is not the only one. There was a story recently of another guy, living the high life, off other people's money. I don't remember the outcome as far as jail time.

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