Plane, copter collide over Hudson; 9 ...

Plane, copter collide over Hudson; 9 believed dead

There are 40 comments on the Connecticut Post story from Aug 8, 2009, titled Plane, copter collide over Hudson; 9 believed dead. In it, Connecticut Post reports that:

A New York City Police helicopter hovers low over the Hudson River as it drops a police diver into the river, Saturday, Aug.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Connecticut Post.

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AVA

Lyman, SC

#1 Aug 8, 2009
RIP It seems the Pilots were not checking visibly all around like they are supposed to.
AVA

Lyman, SC

#3 Aug 8, 2009
There you go ruining another post,,Stop insulting people and stick to the topic,People died in an accident.Have some compassion.
Frijoles-

Fairfield, CT

#4 Aug 8, 2009
What a sad day. I wish peace for the familes.

Sol

Since: Jan 08

Location hidden

#5 Aug 8, 2009
AVA wrote:
RIP It seems the Pilots were not checking visibly all around like they are supposed to.
BUT, a plane only has just so-much it can do to avoid a collision right in front of it - whereas a helicopter has the greater maneuverability. If he rose up in front of the plane there wasn't a heck of a lot else that could happen.

I'll bet it'll end up being the 'copter pilot's fault.
A sad person

West Hartford, CT

#6 Aug 8, 2009
AVA wrote:
There you go ruining another post,,Stop insulting people and stick to the topic,People died in an accident.Have some compassion.
Take your own advice.

Sol

Since: Jan 08

Location hidden

#8 Aug 8, 2009
Connected

United States

#9 Aug 8, 2009
You can speculate all you want, but I'll wait for the NTSB's conclusions.

This site
http://discussions.flightaware.com/viewtopic....
usually has good info.

Sol

Since: Jan 08

Location hidden

#10 Aug 9, 2009
Sol wrote:
I'll bet it'll end up being the 'copter pilot's fault.
Huh. Maybe I'm wrong - witness says the plane caught the 'copter from behind.
http://www.newsdaily.com/stories/tre5771l5-us...
AVA

Lyman, SC

#11 Aug 9, 2009
My guess is they wer both pointing out points of interest and no one was looking I bet the plane was too low.
NYC CT 09

Bedford Hills, NY

#13 Aug 9, 2009
I think that Federal Aviation should make some specific guidelines and rules pertaining to sightseeing over NYC. So sad this happend. RIP
Tony E Neuman

Farmington, CT

#14 Aug 9, 2009
someone should tell Katie that helicopters do not have propellers
AVA

Lyman, SC

#15 Aug 9, 2009
Tony E Neuman wrote:
someone should tell Katie that helicopters do not have propellers
Rotors are what they have.Remember the NYY Picture who flew into the building, they did change regulations for that river,I think it was the east River but they should adopt a new policy for all aircraft that fly into NYC.These planes,and helicopters can do whatever they want as long as they stay under 1,100 feet. They are not governed by air traffic controllers thus they collided, I bet there will be some new regulations now...always too late.
AVA

Lyman, SC

#16 Aug 9, 2009
pitcher
Tony E Neuman

Farmington, CT

#17 Aug 9, 2009
AVA wrote:
<quoted text>Rotors are what they have.
Correct!
Sal Minella

Claremont, NH

#18 Aug 9, 2009
NYC has more air traffic moving around than anyplace else on the planet, most of the time the controller's keep things moving along, but the volume is so dense a collision is almost a forgone conclusion, too bad.
Last week the same helicopter had to land twice with problems, I'm wondering if this is the one.
AVA

Lyman, SC

#20 Aug 9, 2009
Sal Minella wrote:
NYC has more air traffic moving around than anyplace else on the planet, most of the time the controller's keep things moving along, but the volume is so dense a collision is almost a forgone conclusion, too bad.
Last week the same helicopter had to land twice with problems, I'm wondering if this is the one.
If they are flying under 1 100 feet the controller has nothing too do with them they are under the radar system, that's why they were not alerted except by another Pilot Who saw what was going to happen, but they did not respond to his message.
A Pilot

Yonkers, NY

#24 Aug 9, 2009
The corridor down the Hudson river is 1100' high and stretches to the edges of the river, this is perfectly adequate and safe to fly in if everyone does their part. I've taken numerous people around the city on this route and if EVERYONE does their part in see-and-avoid it's safe. How many of these crashes have their been versus total number of flights? not many.

The plane has limited visibility infront-below it, if the helicopter was climbing and "popped-up" in front of the Cherokee then there was scant little the pilot could do to avoid it.

Each pilot operating in the exclusion zone (excluded from air traffic control) is supposed to self-announce their presence at suitable places on the river, listening to these announcements you create a mental image of where the planes are and which ones are near enough to you to worry about. The tour helicopters are usually pretty good about self announcing their positions but they are in business to make money and point out locations so that may well have taken a back seat to doing the right thing with regard to everyone else in the air.

There are already tons of regulations regarding air traffic so no Ava, we don't need more, we need folks to adhere to the ones already in the FAR/AIM.

Corey Leidle screwed things up for the 99.9% of pilots that used to be able to fly up/down the East River responsibly. It was a shame he didn't ask a local pilot or local instructor about his proposed flight path before he left, they'd have told him you can't do what you're proposing to do without busting LaGuardia's airspace. A five minute conversation would have saved 2 (or was it 3) lives and extra regulations for the rest of us.

The best thing is to wait for the NTSB report which will combine eyewitness accounts, radar tracks (which even un-identified will show up on the tapes)and come up with the most plausible scenario.

It was a very sad situation for all concerned and their families.
Tony E Neuman

Cheshire, CT

#25 Aug 10, 2009
A Pilot wrote:
The corridor down the Hudson river is 1100' high and stretches to the edges of the river, this is perfectly adequate and safe to fly in if everyone does their part. I've taken numerous people around the city on this route and if EVERYONE does their part in see-and-avoid it's safe. How many of these crashes have their been versus total number of flights? not many.
The plane has limited visibility infront-below it, if the helicopter was climbing and "popped-up" in front of the Cherokee then there was scant little the pilot could do to avoid it.
Each pilot operating in the exclusion zone (excluded from air traffic control) is supposed to self-announce their presence at suitable places on the river, listening to these announcements you create a mental image of where the planes are and which ones are near enough to you to worry about. The tour helicopters are usually pretty good about self announcing their positions but they are in business to make money and point out locations so that may well have taken a back seat to doing the right thing with regard to everyone else in the air.
There are already tons of regulations regarding air traffic so no Ava, we don't need more, we need folks to adhere to the ones already in the FAR/AIM.
Corey Leidle screwed things up for the 99.9% of pilots that used to be able to fly up/down the East River responsibly. It was a shame he didn't ask a local pilot or local instructor about his proposed flight path before he left, they'd have told him you can't do what you're proposing to do without busting LaGuardia's airspace. A five minute conversation would have saved 2 (or was it 3) lives and extra regulations for the rest of us.
The best thing is to wait for the NTSB report which will combine eyewitness accounts, radar tracks (which even un-identified will show up on the tapes)and come up with the most plausible scenario.
It was a very sad situation for all concerned and their families.
this is one of the most informative and intelligent posts I have ever read on topix.

The article said that the crash occurred shortly after the helicopter took off. The helicopter must have been in a vertical climb to gain altitude and the 2 aircraft crossed paths. For people not in the know, a helicopter usually goes ito a vertical climb just after take-off, and only after a certain altitude, depending on the mission and terrain, will the pilot tilt the rotor disc to head off in a direction closer to the horizontal.
Sal Minella

Claremont, NH

#26 Aug 10, 2009
AVA wrote:
<quoted text>If they are flying under 1 100 feet the controller has nothing too do with them they are under the radar system, that's why they were not alerted except by another Pilot Who saw what was going to happen, but they did not respond to his message.
My mistake, you are absolutly right.
AVA

Lyman, SC

#27 Aug 10, 2009
Sal Minella wrote:
<quoted text>
My mistake, you are absolutly right.
I got that info from my husband who is a Pilot and thought I would pas it on.A few years back a Yankee pitcher flew into a building on the east River flying and sightseeing don't mix.

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