California needs new laws to boost ea...

California needs new laws to boost earthquake safety, assemblyman says

There are 5 comments on the Los Angeles Times story from Mar 15, 2018, titled California needs new laws to boost earthquake safety, assemblyman says. In it, Los Angeles Times reports that:

A Cal State Northridge parking structure suffered a near total collapse in the Jan. 17, 1994, earthquake. A Los Angeles lawmaker says California needs new statewide laws that boost earthquake safety, and wants to toughen rules on how strong new buildings should be and require cities to identify buildings at risk of collapse.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Los Angeles Times.

Solarman

Dewey, AZ

#1 Mar 15, 2018
"A Los Angeles lawmaker says California needs new statewide laws that boost earthquake safety, and wants to toughen rules on how strong new buildings should be and require cities to identify buildings at risk of collapse."

Yeah, that's really great, where does one start with infrastructure upgrades in the State? It has been shown that drainage and bridge structure problems have existed for years and they have not been taken care of. How much of a 'fee' or tax does the Congressman want to impose on the public now?
ThomasA

Guntersville, AL

#2 Mar 15, 2018
Solarman wrote:
"A Los Angeles lawmaker says California needs new statewide laws that boost earthquake safety, and wants to toughen rules on how strong new buildings should be and require cities to identify buildings at risk of collapse."

Yeah, that's really great, where does one start with infrastructure upgrades in the State? It has been shown that drainage and bridge structure problems have existed for years and they have not been taken care of. How much of a 'fee' or tax does the Congressman want to impose on the public now?
A major problem here is that to make earthquake safety an issue, you have to wait until an earthquake hits to test the buildings for real life results other than "reliable statistics from a sterile lab environment". " Ooooooops , the building fell anyway after it was built at three times the cost due to new Federal regulations so now what?"
Solarman

Dewey, AZ

#3 Mar 15, 2018
ThomasA wrote:
<quoted text> A major problem here is that to make earthquake safety an issue, you have to wait until an earthquake hits to test the buildings for real life results other than "reliable statistics from a sterile lab environment". " Ooooooops , the building fell anyway after it was built at three times the cost due to new Federal regulations so now what?"
Since the 1994 Northridge quake, building codes have been changed. More anchor points from the walls to the slab, pinning the roof rafters to the wall seal plates were just some of the 'new' construction requirements. There was a Dr. Lucy Jones that did the studies on the San Andreas for at least a couple of decades. The equations she and her crew came up with suggest the San Andreas will "tear like paper" when it faults again. This will in all probability make the 7.0+ predicted quake last for a minute perhaps a little longer. Most quakes are a sharp 'jump' the P wave and then the rolling of the ground begins. "Tearing" of the fault would more than likely cause many P waves. Imagine your home rising and falling about 1 foot for a minute and then rolling back and forth for several seconds to a minute or more afterwards. It has been pundited that IF the San Andreas faults in a "tearing" manner, it will activate the many "smaller" faults from Riverside county, up through the L.A. and inland empire will also "release" at this time.

As we look at history the San Francisco earthquake was bad, real bad. The massive destruction came after gas lines ruptured and there was NO water infrastructure left to fight the fires. All of this time, technology and California still faces the same problem with NO remedy. Broken infrastructure with fires you can't fight.
ThomasA

Guntersville, AL

#4 Mar 15, 2018
Solarman wrote:
<quoted text>Since the 1994 Northridge quake, building codes have been changed. More anchor points from the walls to the slab, pinning the roof rafters to the wall seal plates were just some of the 'new' construction requirements. There was a Dr. Lucy Jones that did the studies on the San Andreas for at least a couple of decades. The equations she and her crew came up with suggest the San Andreas will "tear like paper" when it faults again. This will in all probability make the 7.0+ predicted quake last for a minute perhaps a little longer. Most quakes are a sharp 'jump' the P wave and then the rolling of the ground begins. "Tearing" of the fault would more than likely cause many P waves. Imagine your home rising and falling about 1 foot for a minute and then rolling back and forth for several seconds to a minute or more afterwards. It has been pundited that IF the San Andreas faults in a "tearing" manner, it will activate the many "smaller" faults from Riverside county, up through the L.A. and inland empire will also "release" at this time.

As we look at history the San Francisco earthquake was bad, real bad. The massive destruction came after gas lines ruptured and there was NO water infrastructure left to fight the fires. All of this time, technology and California still faces the same problem with NO remedy. Broken infrastructure with fires you can't fight.
The same potential danger lies with the Cascadia and New Madrid fault lines plus several more, but there seems to be a ho-hum, if it happens, it happens attitude .
Solarman

Dewey, AZ

#5 Mar 15, 2018
ThomasA wrote:
<quoted text>The same potential danger lies with the Cascadia and New Madrid fault lines plus several more, but there seems to be a ho-hum, if it happens, it happens attitude .
The San Andreas fault is one of the most studied faults in the U.S. if not the world. The interesting part is the Historical value of the first 'Big One' along the San Andreas which destroyed San Francisco, I believe it was 1906 or 1908. Anyway the town was decimated, law and order disintegrated to chaos almost overnight and crime ruled the streets. There began a movement in San Francisco of like minded men. These men built a 'Fort' near what is now Union Square and in Union Square was a bell. If you had a problem, you would go to Union Square and ring the bell. These men would show up, you tell them your problem and they would 'fix' it. These 'militiamen' brought swift law and order back to a ruined San Francisco. Near-do-wells and reavers were not tolerated, many unruly died for such offenses as molesting ladies along what was left of the streets. As the city was rebuilt, the 'Fort' was torn down and the 'militia' reintegrated back into San Francisco's society.

When the San Andreas opens up once again and visits hell on California, will there be a body of like minded men to form a militia to set direction and restore order from chaos? These are the times when the affected, entitled say "it's a free country". Yeah, until you HAVE to put your own life on the line to keep the criminal element from ruling your everyday lives. So, Thomas, do you think there are ANY such men left in Commiefornia that would stand their ground and restore order to destruction and chaos?

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