Southwest Airlines Pilot Suspected Of Being Drunk

Posted in the North Salt Lake Forum

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SK Bokkins VP-Corp Finan

United States

#1 Jul 9, 2006
I don't understand someone like this pilot, giving up their life as they know it by trying to fly drunk. I was familair with the two AW pilots who tried the same deal in Miami, however they actually got on board and tried to taxi the A320 while it was still linked to the tug. In all three case the level of alcohol was so high many at the security points were able to smell it. I don't think any of the three pilots would qualify as alcoholics, but careless. This pilot was based in the Dallas area, it doesn't say if he had an overnight in SLC or had flown earlier then had a few hours break.
Incredibilty stupid, it doesn't happen often, thank heavens, but how terrible it could be if both pilots were impaired and not caught as the AP's happy boys were close to..
Rocky Raccoon

Carrollton, TX

#3 Jul 10, 2006
What ever happened to innocent until proven guilty?
The TSA weenies just love doing this instead of catching terrorists. Maybe they should stick to their job, and it certainly isn't administering Breathalyzer tests from 20 feet away. I will wait for all the facts.
Ben Franklin

Philadelphia, PA

#4 Jul 10, 2006
SK Bokkins VP-Corp Finan wrote:
I don't understand someone like this pilot, giving up their life as they know it by trying to fly drunk. I was familair with the two AW pilots who tried the same deal in Miami, however they actually got on board and tried to taxi the A320 while it was still linked to the tug. In all three case the level of alcohol was so high many at the security points were able to smell it. I don't think any of the three pilots would qualify as alcoholics, but careless. This pilot was based in the Dallas area, it doesn't say if he had an overnight in SLC or had flown earlier then had a few hours break.
Incredibilty stupid, it doesn't happen often, thank heavens, but how terrible it could be if both pilots were impaired and not caught as the AP's happy boys were close to..
Wrong, this behavior is symptomatic of an alcoholic. When it affects the well bieng of yourself and others you're an alcoholic.

They've laft themselves two options, whatever legal ramifications they'll have to deal with and treatment.
Tim the pilot

Overland Park, KS

#5 Jul 10, 2006
I guess one beer can cost a miilion dollars, eh?
TinDC

AOL

#6 Jul 10, 2006
Obviously one beer can cost you a million dollars and if the TSA agent was able to smell the alcohol on his breath then he more than likely had more than one beer! Flight crew know the rules about drinking before flying, there is no doubt about them. If he was willing to ignore the rules set by the FAA and the airline then maybe that is an indication of a bigger problem. Good on the TSA for being safety conscience and doing their job!!!!
Pilot Phil

Louisville, KY

#7 Jul 10, 2006
Flying while intoxicated is a dangerous situation, however passengers should realize that their pilots are more often than not flying fatigued. Flying fatigued decreases one's ability to recognize and react to a potentially dangerous situation, the same effects as flying impaired by alcohol. Flying fatiuged is frequent in the airline business, especially in cargo ops, due to a lack of oversight by the FAA and a willingness of frieght operators to ignore basic circadian rhythm parameters. Remember...they fly over your house every night.
East Coast Girl

Fall River, MA

#8 Jul 10, 2006
Pilot Phil wrote:
Flying while intoxicated is a dangerous situation, however passengers should realize that their pilots are more often than not flying fatigued. Flying fatigued decreases one's ability to recognize and react to a potentially dangerous situation, the same effects as flying impaired by alcohol. Flying fatiuged is frequent in the airline business, especially in cargo ops, due to a lack of oversight by the FAA and a willingness of frieght operators to ignore basic circadian rhythm parameters. Remember...they fly over your house every night.
Should it be legal for a flight crew to commute for a trip the same day? Doesn't that add to fatigue as well?
Coyote

Surprise, AZ

#9 Jul 10, 2006
Pilot Phil wrote:
Flying while intoxicated is a dangerous situation, however passengers should realize that their pilots are more often than not flying fatigued. Flying fatigued decreases one's ability to recognize and react to a potentially dangerous situation, the same effects as flying impaired by alcohol. Flying fatiuged is frequent in the airline business, especially in cargo ops, due to a lack of oversight by the FAA and a willingness of frieght operators to ignore basic circadian rhythm parameters. Remember...they fly over your house every night.
Find another soapbox, Phil. This one's about drinking close to duty
East Coast Girl

Fall River, MA

#10 Jul 10, 2006
Ben Franklin wrote:
<quoted text>
Wrong, this behavior is symptomatic of an alcoholic. When it affects the well bieng of yourself and others you're an alcoholic.
They've laft themselves two options, whatever legal ramifications they'll have to deal with and treatment.
I guess that is what addiction is about hitting rock bottom. Thank God someone was paying attention!
Coyote

Surprise, AZ

#12 Jul 10, 2006
MostGood wrote:
Well, I guess it all boils down to: "If it's time to go it's time to go....what else do you wanna know". I speak that from experience. If you complain about the [possibility] of being involved in a plane crash, because the pilot is inebriated, you stand the risk of someone telling you off, like theyz done me....mmmm-hmmmm! One time I got lost when I was just a shy'l in d'big city of D@LL@S, and when I told the an adult about my situation, he said - "So what's your problem kid, I'm lost too!" That's why Dallas has gotten a bad rap, theyz think theyz all big and that.
You're a waste of time, skin, and air. A brilliant addition to this thread!
Danielle

Seattle, WA

#13 Jul 10, 2006
A lot of things can smell like alcohol - including cough syrup and mouthwash - both of which would make since for a pilot to use.

This man should be considered innocent until proven guilty.
West Coast Girl

Baytown, TX

#14 Jul 10, 2006
East Coast Girl wrote:
<quoted text>Should it be legal for a flight crew to commute for a trip the same day? Doesn't that add to fatigue as well?
Commuters choose to commute. It makes you tired? Move. Or, fly in the night before and spend 10 dollars for a crash pad
Lance Winslow

United States

#16 Jul 10, 2006
MostGood wrote:
Oh, little do you know! I went on a flight from DFW to Atlanta and little did I know that the pilot that had befriended me in the airport was (the pilot) one of the pilots flying. And he even offered me a drink. That was a long time ago. Then I flew to NY the following day and I found out they are (were) allowed to drink, but not too much. Guess it's still going around. But why?
Actually the FAA law is 8-hours between bottle and throttle, so no, this would have been against the law and they are a lot more strict about it than they use to be. Although probably one or two drinks within 8-hours would not be a serious issue, it could be a contributing factor, along with weather, equipment malfunction, airtraffic control mess up or any number of potential issues. Remember you are basically flying in a Sub-sonic toothpaste tube at 40,000 feet where it is as cold as ice and no oxygen exists. Take off speeds in excess of 100 mph and landing speeds even higher. Serious stuff indeed.
West Coast Girl

Baytown, TX

#17 Jul 10, 2006
Lance Winslow wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually the FAA law is 8-hours between bottle and throttle, so no, this would have been against the law and they are a lot more strict about it than they use to be. Although probably one or two drinks within 8-hours would not be a serious issue, it could be a contributing factor, along with weather, equipment malfunction, airtraffic control mess up or any number of potential issues. Remember you are basically flying in a Sub-sonic toothpaste tube at 40,000 feet where it is as cold as ice and no oxygen exists. Take off speeds in excess of 100 mph and landing speeds even higher. Serious stuff indeed.
Go away~ most good.
You obviously surfed on into a forum you are neither welcome at, nor intelligent enough to comment on. Buy-Bye...Watch your step, Please! Take care! bye! Thanks for flying with us! buy-bye..Oh, you want more peanuts? Of COURSE you do! Bye now!
East Coast Girl

Fall River, MA

#19 Jul 11, 2006
Danielle wrote:
A lot of things can smell like alcohol - including cough syrup and mouthwash - both of which would make since for a pilot to use.
This man should be considered innocent until proven guilty.
Of course what you say is true, but don't blame someone for questioning him. That is the responsible thing to do. All the pilot or anyone else has to do is say OK let's settle this in a hospital with a blood test. You are right we do not know the facts, but if it were me and knew I was innocent my ass would be in a hospital as fast as you can get me there.
Ben Franklin

Philadelphia, PA

#20 Jul 11, 2006
Lance Winslow wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually the FAA law is 8-hours between bottle and throttle, so no, this would have been against the law and they are a lot more strict about it than they use to be. Although probably one or two drinks within 8-hours would not be a serious issue, it could be a contributing factor, along with weather, equipment malfunction, airtraffic control mess up or any number of potential issues. Remember you are basically flying in a Sub-sonic toothpaste tube at 40,000 feet where it is as cold as ice and no oxygen exists. Take off speeds in excess of 100 mph and landing speeds even higher. Serious stuff indeed.
And just think of all the stuff that could be in the circulatory system that you can't smell on someones breath.
Coyote

Surprise, AZ

#21 Jul 11, 2006
West Coast Girl wrote:
<quoted text>
Go away~ most good.
You obviously surfed on into a forum you are neither welcome at, nor intelligent enough to comment on. Buy-Bye...Watch your step, Please! Take care! bye! Thanks for flying with us! buy-bye..Oh, you want more peanuts? Of COURSE you do! Bye now!
Well, WestCoastGirl, MostGood in Dallas caught us out. He must have seen us rendezvousing at a motel very near the airport....on his way to the Mensa Convention.

Pax/Paz
West Coast Girl

Baytown, TX

#22 Jul 11, 2006
Coyote wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, WestCoastGirl, MostGood in Dallas caught us out. He must have seen us rendezvousing at a motel very near the airport....on his way to the Mensa Convention.
Pax/Paz
Haha! Jealousy can rear its ugly self in many ways! Poor man. Him and his fellow Mensa members can sit around and form hypothesis, while us carousing no good drunken flight crews, live love & laugh.
So where do you overnight on 7-16? Dallas?, How about we buddy bunk!:) That'll give them something to brainstorm about.
Annie

AOL

#23 Jul 11, 2006
Be nice that is rude and uncalled for!
MostGood wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh yes, I'll go away, but NOT on an airplane. You guys get in trouble, and you FLIGHT ATTENDANTS cover up for the pilots, cuz you have "RENDEVOUS" with them at the nearby hotels very close to the airport, and YOU are telling me to go away. Whhheeeeee, thanks! I've seen and heard enough of your fornicating/adulterous ways and the cheating you guys/gals go about "working together" huuuummph! Oh I better go AWAY, since I just got "bumped" and they have peanuts........LMAO! Diry girl you!
Delta neighbor

United States

#24 Jul 12, 2006
Pilot Phil wrote:
Flying while intoxicated is a dangerous situation, however passengers should realize that their pilots are more often than not flying fatigued. Flying fatigued decreases one's ability to recognize and react to a potentially dangerous situation, the same effects as flying impaired by alcohol. Flying fatiuged is frequent in the airline business, especially in cargo ops, due to a lack of oversight by the FAA and a willingness of frieght operators to ignore basic circadian rhythm parameters. Remember...they fly over your house every night.
Everyone speaks of the perils of drinking and flying. What about flying with a monster hangover?????

I know pilots who synchronize their watches to make sure they don't violate policy on drinking but yet get on a plane impaired with hangover to the point of nausea and migraine headache from previous night's indulgence. As for me, the worst of two evils is the uncontrolled hangover. What do you think????

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