Turning point of the turning point

Turning point of the turning point

There are 25 comments on the Bennington Banner story from Aug 12, 2010, titled Turning point of the turning point. In it, Bennington Banner reports that:

On a foggy morning in August 1777, about 2,000 men broke camp and prepared for battle.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Bennington Banner.

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KathyK

New Britain, CT

#1 Aug 13, 2010
Interesting - didn't know New Hampshire got their motto from our battle. Too bad we didn't take it - and actually live by it.
Kim

Rutland, VT

#2 Aug 13, 2010
"Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils."

As true today as it was then.
shadeclan

Albany, NY

#3 Aug 13, 2010
Audrey, thank you for your continuing efforts to enlighten the readers of this paper. Keep up the good work!
Andy Anderson

Middlebury, VT

#4 Aug 13, 2010
Thank you Audrey...
Stark must have been a truly charismatic leader. To have the conviction of principle to actually lead by example, and to have coined two of the most inspiring quotes (IMO) in the history of mankind.... All I can say is please God send us another John Stark soon.
"There are your enemies, the Red Coats and the Tories. They are ours, or this night Molly Stark sleeps a widow!"
(that one still gives me the chills.)
Mark Shepard - Bennington

Brookline, MA

#5 Aug 13, 2010
These men understood that it is wrong for one person or group of people to lord over another person or group of persons and that it is wrong enough to fight against.

Today we are rapidly returning to a nation with lords and servants, with a self-appointed elite class trying to control the people through government. While our battle today need not be a bloody battle, it is no less important to future generations than the Battle of Bennington has been to our generation.

Vermont itself is a great example of how things are shifting from self-government by and for the people to a governing class that either in ignorance or ill-intent enacts policy after policy that widens the chasm between the elite and the rest of the people.

Join the battle to reopen the Vermont State House to the people … www.VermontersHouse.us . You are needed as much as the soldiers of 1777.
Tom Licata

Burlington, VT

#6 Aug 13, 2010
Audrey,

Thank you, again, for your wonderfully written words.

Two sentences that struck me most in this piece:

"...As the British approached New England many of their neighbors had accepted protection, some turning from patriots to loyalists in a matter of hours."

To me, this speaks to our decision at hand, do we choose security over liberty, as many did as "the British approached?"

Do we choose to live in a dependency culture, as many "had accepted protection" as "the British approached?"

And, of course, the sentence highlighting General Stark's quote:

"Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils."

Truer words of liberty and independence were never spoke.
Lindsay

Montgomery, IN

#7 Aug 13, 2010
I would like to know why Bennington is claiming all the fame for having the battle in Bennington when it was in NY. I would also like to know why it's called the battle of Bennington....it should be the battle of Walloomsac. The British were trying to get to Bennington but were stopped in Walloomsac which is where the battle occurred
Ayn Rand

New Britain, CT

#8 Aug 13, 2010
Lindsay wrote:
I would like to know why Bennington is claiming all the fame for having the battle in Bennington when it was in NY. I would also like to know why it's called the battle of Bennington....it should be the battle of Walloomsac. The British were trying to get to Bennington but were stopped in Walloomsac which is where the battle occurred
And the battle of Saratoga should be called "The Battle of Bemis Heights" and "The Battle of Schuylerville." What a silly comment.
Local Vter

Bennington, VT

#9 Aug 13, 2010
Good article. How unfortunate that the Battlefield remained closed this year due to NY budget cuts.
Audrey

New Britain, CT

#10 Aug 13, 2010
Local Vter wrote:
Good article. How unfortunate that the Battlefield remained closed this year due to NY budget cuts.
Actually the battlefield is open this summer. There's not a lot to it but there is a good description of the battle and a nice relief map that illustrates where and how it progressed. A colonial house near or in the park, however, is no longer open.
Toaster802

Middlebury, VT

#11 Aug 13, 2010
Interesting - didn't know New Hampshire got their motto from our battle. Too bad we didn't take it - and actually live by it.

"Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils."
As true today as it was then.

Today we are rapidly returning to a nation with lords and servants, with a self-appointed elite class trying to control the people through government.

Vermont itself is a great example of how things are shifting from self-government by and for the people to a governing class that either in ignorance or ill-intent enacts policy after policy that widens the chasm between the elite and the rest of the people.

As you can see from above, the spirit of '76 is still alive, Sleeping ever lightly as the our countrymen discover the evil withing that would have us crawling on all fours like a beast for the edification of the Elite. They do not think that Freedom and LIBERTY burn brighter in the hearts of men than the craven desire to feed apon the fruits of others labor. Those that sound the alarms of panic and fear, promise things for non payment of tender, but charged directly to the souls of men.

There are only two powers that can cash in payment for our souls. Good and evil.

Freedom and Liberty are the currency of God and free men.

Slavery and theft or the currency of Satan and those who would be our masters.

On who's charge card are YOU running up YOUR bill?
Kim

Rutland, VT

#12 Aug 13, 2010
Lindsey the battle was fought in 1777 the Vt and NY state line was not established until 1791, so at the time of the battle the boundaries had not been established and I believe Vt claimed the land where the battle took place. Someone should check me on that though.
Audrey, I read in the Banner that for the celebration this weekend the park and the colonial house will both be open to the public free of charge. Follow this link for a full list of the activities starting tonight and running through Monday.
http://www.benningtonbanner.com/ci_15713699...
Lady Liberty

Bennington, VT

#13 Aug 13, 2010
Those patriots fought the Battle and formed this state on the the following principle:

Article 18th. Regard to fundamental principles and virtues necessary to preserve liberty
That frequent recurrence to fundamental principles, and a firm adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, industry, and frugality, are absolutely necessary to preserve the blessings of liberty, and keep government free; the people ought, therefore to pay particular attention to these points, in the choice of officers and representatives, and have a right, in a legal way, to exact a due and constant regard to them, from their legislators and magistrates, and in making and executing such laws as are necessary for the good government of the State.

What dishonor the state has shown to these brave patriots. Men who shed their blood and risked all. All our Representatives (both state and federal) have turned themselves inside side out to make us more and more dependent on outside sources and to become the nation's 6th highest Welfare state. Higher even than California and New York. That is not freedom, that is slavery in its finest form.
Lindsay

United States

#14 Aug 13, 2010
Ayn Rand wrote:
<quoted text>
And the battle of Saratoga should be called "The Battle of Bemis Heights" and "The Battle of Schuylerville." What a silly comment.
At least those battles are in the same state and the historic sites are at the actual site where the battle took place
Larry

New Britain, CT

#15 Aug 13, 2010
If it means anything it is called the Battle of Bennington and not the Battle at Bennington
Braveheart

New Haven, CT

#16 Aug 13, 2010
Great article Audrey

Have you ever considered that British lost because of their relative size? After some historical research, or at least a quick shufty at the diorama that has graced the stair well of the monument for many years, it appears that the opposing forces were considerably shorter and the home team.

Something to think about. Perhaps further research is required. I can feel an academic grant application coming on.

Have a wonderful and safe Battle Day folks :)
Braveheart

New Haven, CT

#17 Aug 13, 2010
...than the home team.
Audrey

New Britain, CT

#18 Aug 13, 2010
Braveheart wrote:
Great article Audrey
Have you ever considered that British lost because of their relative size? After some historical research, or at least a quick shufty at the diorama that has graced the stair well of the monument for many years, it appears that the opposing forces were considerably shorter and the home team.
Something to think about. Perhaps further research is required. I can feel an academic grant application coming on.
Have a wonderful and safe Battle Day folks :)
Well, Braveheart, we did grow 'em bigger here in the colonies. Had to do with better access to nutritious food (and lots of it) and less exposure to disease.

We also had twice as many soldiers fighting that battle. Of course, our soldiers were really farmers and craftsmen by trade and not experienced like most of the British troops. But the British force was also handicapped with inexperienced Tories and Native Americans who left as soon as they sensed defeat and weren't really committed to the cause. The Americans were far more familiar with the terrain, the British and Germans faced language barrier difficulties - there were so many factors. But it probably comes down to some excellent strategic planning by Stark and Warner and the commitment of men who were fighting for their land, their homes and their freedom.
Braveheart

New Haven, CT

#19 Aug 14, 2010
It's all a mater of perspective - of the diorama that is :)
Jubal Harshaw

Waitsfield, VT

#20 Aug 14, 2010
The rabble stood up to the British and company in order to retain their property, aka, the homesteads and communities they had carved out of the pristine forests we now call southern Vermont.

Or as Calvin Coolidge put it some years later,
“Ultimately property rights and personal rights are the same thing.”

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