Navy to Host Largest Solar Energy Pro...

Navy to Host Largest Solar Energy Project in VA - NBC29 WVIR Charlottesville, VA News, Sports and...

There are 42 comments on the NBC29 Charlottesville story from Dec 5, 2012, titled Navy to Host Largest Solar Energy Project in VA - NBC29 WVIR Charlottesville, VA News, Sports and.... In it, NBC29 Charlottesville reports that:

The Navy has finished construction on the largest solar energy project in Virginia.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at NBC29 Charlottesville.

buyerbeware

Crozet, VA

#22 Dec 11, 2012
thinking free wrote:
<quoted text>So your cheap shot at my dear departed mother gives you credibility to this issue. Thats OK, I'll match my bank account against yours anyday.
So you are the daughter now? What does your bank account have to do with it? Sorry for your loss, but she is still influencing you. Put your big girl panties on and go to work.
thinking free

Charlottesville, VA

#23 Dec 11, 2012
buyerbeware wrote:
<quoted text>So you are the daughter now? What does your bank account have to do with it? Sorry for your loss, but she is still influencing you. Put your big girl panties on and go to work.
Gawd you are so wrong about alot.
buyerbeware

Crozet, VA

#24 Dec 11, 2012
thinking free wrote:
<quoted text>Gawd you are so wrong about alot.
As wrong as you are about a lot...
Dude

Lovingston, VA

#25 Dec 12, 2012
G Luv wrote:
<quoted text>
They are _not_ saving $25/month by reducing heat loss from their water heater. It's just not feasible.
Something else is going on, such as switching to a time-of-use rate, getting a peak demand rebate, changing water use habits or equipment, or not calculating the savings correctly.
For those who want to reduce their bills, reducing consumption is the first thing to attack. Then insulate your tank._Then_ look into rate switching. A family of four need not spend more than $20-30/month on water heating.
insulation was my first thought. Possibly an outdated heater, but for certain a supplemental insulating blanket/ wrap most certainly would help. Switching to a gas tankless heater would save some, too. Climate control (A/C and heat) is the largest "consumer" or resistor in domestic energy, an inefficient dryer and stove "consumes" a lot of energy as well. Upgrading appliances and climate control, depending on the age of the units, can pay off in a relative short amount of time.
.
I put consume in quotes because they don't actually consume energy, they just convert it to another phase and/ or resist it. They do, however, consume one's net income
Dude

Lovingston, VA

#26 Dec 12, 2012
BTW, the rule of thumb is that a MW powers 1000 homes; so the math does not add up. Either the project manager is wrong, misquoted, or there is a typo.
thinking free

Charlottesville, VA

#27 Dec 12, 2012
buyerbeware wrote:
<quoted text>As wrong as you are about a lot...
I ain't never wrong about nuffin.
G Luv

Marietta, GA

#28 Dec 12, 2012
Dude wrote:
BTW, the rule of thumb is that a MW powers 1000 homes; so the math does not add up. Either the project manager is wrong, misquoted, or there is a typo.
That's for peak loads. A MW of solar provides much less energy than a MW from a coal plant, so the number of houses is far fewer.

For _installed_ capacity -> houses, I think that's about right.
wasp

South Boston, VA

#29 Dec 12, 2012
solar wont run your a/c etc it takes forever to pay off envestment on efffing batteries aka , no wonder government invests in it to piss away your tax dollars
Dude

Rapidan, VA

#30 Dec 14, 2012
G Luv wrote:
<quoted text>
That's for peak loads. A MW of solar provides much less energy than a MW from a coal plant, so the number of houses is far fewer.
For _installed_ capacity -> houses, I think that's about right.
a Watt is one joule per second; a joule is a derived unit of energy (ability to do work) and heat expended (or work completed) in applying a force of one newton through a distance of one meter. So a Watt is work/time and is a constant. Industries measure them in MWh, or MegaWatt hours, and plants are rated at their capacity and report their capacities daily (as required by federal law). different plants have different ratings based on different conditions, IE Gas turbines are greatly affected by ambient temps, and solar are limited by light, however as I will address in the next post, there are a few different types of plants and some of those can still generate or rather, release energy converted even though it's night like the gemasolar heliostic plants.
.
A watt is a watt is a watt, it's not less and it's not more. It's a watt.
.
For peak loads generating utilities use simple cycle gas turbines like the on in Louisa County, and hydro pump up facilities like the one in Bath County.
Dude

Rapidan, VA

#31 Dec 14, 2012
wasp wrote:
solar wont run your a/c etc it takes forever to pay off envestment on efffing batteries aka , no wonder government invests in it to **** away your tax dollars
I think you mean investments.
.
One of my biggest criticism of solar plants is their use of heavy metals while decrying environmentalism. No battery lasts for ever, but recycling techniques have come a very, very long way and are very close to becoming environmentally sound.
.
As I mentioned above there are different types of solar plants, though, and the kind that you mention is the photovoltaic cells that convert light to energy (Watts) and either use them or store them. Energy must be used, which means that all the plants out there converting energy (generating) must match exactly what is being put out.(meaning when you turn a light on, the "line" must increase load by what ever the wattage is that you're using (a typical incandescent is 60W, HCFL is around 15W, and LEDs are as low as 4MW) Utilities have a good way of regulating this through their use of grounding (sending valance electrons back to the generator, if you believe in mass flow, if you believe in hole flow, then bumping one back) and capacitors (coils that store energy that suppress surges) in their system (switch yards and substations)
.
Instead of typing out a bunch of stuff that you may or may not understand; I've found an article that sums up 6 types of solar plants that are in use. The article's appeal is that it uses lay terms in describing these plants.
.
http://www.energydigital.com/sectors/energy/b...
Dude

Rapidan, VA

#32 Dec 14, 2012
Dude wrote:
<quoted text>a Watt is one joule per second; a joule is a derived unit of energy (ability to do work) and heat expended (or work completed) in applying a force of one newton through a distance of one meter. So a Watt is work/time and is a constant. Industries measure them in MWh, or MegaWatt hours, and plants are rated at their capacity and report their capacities daily (as required by federal law). different plants have different ratings based on different conditions, IE Gas turbines are greatly affected by ambient temps, and solar are limited by light, however as I will address in the next post, there are a few different types of plants and some of those can still generate or rather, release energy converted even though it's night like the gemasolar heliostic plants.
.
A watt is a watt is a watt, it's not less and it's not more. It's a watt.
.
For peak loads generating utilities use simple cycle gas turbines like the on in Louisa County, and hydro pump up facilities like the one in Bath County.
*the one in Louisa County. smh
thinking free

Charlottesville, VA

#33 Dec 14, 2012
Ohms law doesn't work with varying kinds of watts. Ohms law is a constant, last time I used my multimeter anyway.
G Luv

Charlottesville, VA

#34 Dec 14, 2012
Dude wrote:
...
A MW of installed solar produces less _energy_ than a MW of installed coal/gas/nuclear.

They provide the same _power_ at peak load, but because a solar plant can't run at peak power all the time, it produces less energy over the course of the day/month/year.

So while a 1 MW coal plant can make 24 MWh/day (nominally enough for 1,000 houses), a 1 MW solar plant makes a fraction of the MWh/day, powering far fewer houses.
Dude

Spotsylvania, VA

#35 Dec 14, 2012
G Luv wrote:
<quoted text>
A MW of installed solar produces less _energy_ than a MW of installed coal/gas/nuclear.
They provide the same _power_ at peak load, but because a solar plant can't run at peak power all the time, it produces less energy over the course of the day/month/year.
So while a 1 MW coal plant can make 24 MWh/day (nominally enough for 1,000 houses), a 1 MW solar plant makes a fraction of the MWh/day, powering far fewer houses.
You're having a disconnect from peak load and rated capacity. A MW is a MW, at any given time if it is generating a MW, it has the capability to power 1000 homes, that is rating. There is no such thing as a MW that has less potential from one energy source than another. It can either power x or it can't. System load changes as demand changes (see previous explaination) They change the loads on various plants, if they're off line, they're still rated for X amount of Watts, that does not change the fact that a MW powers approximately 1000 homes.
G Luv

Marietta, GA

#36 Dec 14, 2012
Dude wrote:
<quoted text>You're having a disconnect from peak load and rated capacity. A MW is a MW, at any given time if it is generating a MW, it has the capability to power 1000 homes, that is rating. There is no such thing as a MW that has less potential from one energy source than another. It can either power x or it can't. System load changes as demand changes (see previous explaination) They change the loads on various plants, if they're off line, they're still rated for X amount of Watts, that does not change the fact that a MW powers approximately 1000 homes.
In common parlance, the rated capacity of a solar plant is its peak power output.

In common parlance, when someone says a solar plant will power X number of homes, they are typically talking about its energy output over some time. It would be silly to say a 1MW solar plant will power 1,000 homes, because it would only do that for a few hours of sunny days. It is much more meaningful to calculate the amount of energy a solar plant will make in a year and divide it by the energy a typical house uses over the same period. That number will be much smaller than the number of homes that a 1MW coal plant could "power" over the same period, using a similarly crude analysis.

I have the physics worked out -- trust me. I'm just telling you why the reported number is lower than you think it should be.
Dude

Spotsylvania, VA

#37 Dec 14, 2012
G Luv wrote:
<quoted text>
In common parlance, the rated capacity of a solar plant is its peak power output.
In common parlance, when someone says a solar plant will power X number of homes, they are typically talking about its energy output over some time. It would be silly to say a 1MW solar plant will power 1,000 homes, because it would only do that for a few hours of sunny days. It is much more meaningful to calculate the amount of energy a solar plant will make in a year and divide it by the energy a typical house uses over the same period. That number will be much smaller than the number of homes that a 1MW coal plant could "power" over the same period, using a similarly crude analysis.
I have the physics worked out -- trust me. I'm just telling you why the reported number is lower than you think it should be.
I don't know how much further I can break it down for you than work over time. 1 MW is 1 MW, it doesn't matter if it is dark or light, whether it is generating or not, it is 1 MW and at its capacity it has the potential to power 1000 homes. When a 7FA is shut down, it is still rated for roughly 180 MW, so that is what you call it. A MW from a coal plant is still measured in the same work over time as a solar plant; there is no difference in the ratings of a power plant based on the energy source. Electricity is almost instantaneous, the electricity that you're using (or converting) right now was produced tenths, hundredths or even milliseconds ago. If it can only power 200 homes at any given moment, it is not a 2.1 MW plant. It is a .21 MW plant, or a 210 KW plant. I know what you are saying, but that isn't how it works.
thinking free

Charlottesville, VA

#38 Dec 14, 2012
Electrons travel at the speed of light regardless of sourse. Load is the issue here. Panels cannot sustain the same load as conventional means, nukes or otherwise. Its like trying to start your 12v car with abunch of flashlight batteries. Same voltage but no amps. Without amps you can't sustain the load. Panels are good for low wattage use, thats about it.
Dude

Spotsylvania, VA

#39 Dec 14, 2012
thinking free wrote:
Electrons travel at the speed of light regardless of sourse. Load is the issue here. Panels cannot sustain the same load as conventional means, nukes or otherwise. Its like trying to start your 12v car with abunch of flashlight batteries. Same voltage but no amps. Without amps you can't sustain the load. Panels are good for low wattage use, thats about it.
Deutschland disagrees with you
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/05/26/us-...
thinking free

Charlottesville, VA

#40 Dec 14, 2012
A great piece, to bad this country can't see the light(yoke). But me thinks I'd would have to see the real loads placed on they're grid to be convinced it can handle commercial loads.
Dude

Spotsylvania, VA

#41 Dec 14, 2012
thinking free wrote:
A great piece, to bad this country can't see the light(yoke). But me thinks I'd would have to see the real loads placed on they're grid to be convinced it can handle commercial loads.
Like I've told our friend G Luv, a MW is a MW, I'm sure they use large capacitors for high amp draws.(industrial start ups)... they produce more cars than us twice over (and pay their workers twice as much)

http://www.forbes.com/sites/haydnshaughnessy/...

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