Special education controversy

Special education controversy

There are 801 comments on the Hampton Roads Daily Press story from May 27, 2008, titled Special education controversy. In it, Hampton Roads Daily Press reports that:

Consent would not be required for cessation of services and determining services for transfers.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Hampton Roads Daily Press.

First Prev
of 41
Next Last
Git-a-Grip

Hampton, VA

#1 May 27, 2008
Maybe the general public should that there are "people" out there who work the system. Say it ain't so! There are many parents who refuse to let their children out of special education services so they can continue to get Social Security disability. This practice is very common of parent keeping the children in special ed even though they do not qualify any longer. It would be nice if the great Gov. Kaine would tell the whole story rather then courting the handout class in an effort to get an Obama nod. We worry about illegal's getting SSI benefits but we don't do anything about the abusers. Isn't it common for the social parasites not to pay taxes either.
Git-a-Grip

Hampton, VA

#2 May 27, 2008
Also, I don't understand Ms. Harrison's concern when her daughter is and always will be eligible for services, and rightly so. The current system tied the hands of the school system when a child is no longer needing services and the parents abuse the system. I for one am tired of paying for the abusers of social america. As a truly concerned advocate Ms. Harrison should be on a band wagon to get the deadwood out of Special Ed services allowing the ones who need the system a better chance and more quality.
Traffic

Norfolk, VA

#3 May 27, 2008
I think Ms. Harrison is doing the right thing by continuing to be part of the Special Ed programs and encouraging parent participation. If parents who's children need the programs are not pro-active, then the programs will diminish and the children who need them, will no longer have access to them.

My child is gifted and was declined special services for four years. The school system wanted me to withdrawl him because they did bot want to provide the appropriate education. If we had not been pro-active, he woul dhave been expelled this year just for asking too many question, or for reading a book when he was done with his assignments.

Many of the children in the Special Ed programs are gifted and until the right teacher comes along acknowledging their differences, theu get stuck in LD classes, which takes away from the children who would benefit from these programs.
special ed parent

United States

#4 May 27, 2008
I have concerns that there will be more kids who will fall through the cracks. If a child is given the right help early in life they can grow up to be productive members of society. But studies have shown that kids who are made to feel inferior in school (it is harder for some kids to do everyday thing than other) grow up to have behavior and other problems. So the question is do we want to pay now or pay later.

As for parental involvement. As the parent of a special ed child myself, I can honestly say NO PARENT WANTS THEIR CHILD TO QUALIFY. But when you see your kids struggling, you want to do anything you can to make life less hard... not easy, just less difficult. And the communication between parent, school system and doctors is crucial. By eliminating the required parental involvement you are taking away a critical part of the cycle. No one knows a child like a parent.
paulie

Fort Huachuca, AZ

#5 May 27, 2008
In an age where the schools are having the worst time keeping parents of at-risk children involved in their education, often leading to increased incidence of dropouts, it is amazing that the VDOE is trying any method that lessens parental involvement. Does Special Ed as we know it need major changes? Absolutely. There are problems with the system and there are abuses of it. However, the schools should be encouraging parents to be involved. They shouldn't roll over and let the system be played, but they should keep them involved.
paulie

Fort Huachuca, AZ

#7 May 27, 2008
Richard Harris wrote:
There are true learning disabled - for which the taxpayer pays lavishly for baby sitting services while the parents have the day off and claim their child is normal - and there are the marginally learning disabled - speech problems, ADHD (drugs all day)- for whom a little extra goes along way. For the true learning disabled, what used to be the "monons" and "idiots", special ed provides baby sitting services. There are no studies to show that all of these years of bleeding the taxpayer so that the parents can have time off and claim their kid is normal, results in a functional adult. Special ed is an industry; a big business with its own lobby. So they fight any changes to the system because they lose money; the kids are not that important, employment is. Maybe if the parents accepted responsibility for raising their children at home we would not be throwing taxpayer resources into baby sitting services for the severely impaired. For the marginally impaired, the programs are a start.
You have a cold and selfish soul.

“I pity the fool !!”

Since: Jan 08

Milford, VA

#8 May 27, 2008
Richard Harris wrote:
There are true learning disabled - for which the taxpayer pays lavishly for baby sitting services while the parents have the day off and claim their child is normal - and there are the marginally learning disabled - speech problems, ADHD (drugs all day)- for whom a little extra goes along way. For the true learning disabled, what used to be the "monons" and "idiots", special ed provides baby sitting services. There are no studies to show that all of these years of bleeding the taxpayer so that the parents can have time off and claim their kid is normal, results in a functional adult. Special ed is an industry; a big business with its own lobby. So they fight any changes to the system because they lose money; the kids are not that important, employment is. Maybe if the parents accepted responsibility for raising their children at home we would not be throwing taxpayer resources into baby sitting services for the severely impaired. For the marginally impaired, the programs are a start.
Its hysterical when individuals rant about something they obviously know nothing about.
Opps

Hampton, VA

#9 May 27, 2008
I feel for the parents of special needs children but why are the tax payers responsible for care of their children?
Richard Harris

Columbus, OH

#10 May 27, 2008
paulie wrote:
<quoted text>You have a cold and selfish soul.
The amount of money we blow here could feed millions of starving people. So you would turn over raising (actually warehousing) the severely handicapped to the State so the parents can be relieved of their guilt. Show me one study that demonstrates the positive results of years of taxpayer supported schooling of the severely handicapped other than letting parents have the day off. Lumping everyone (mild and severely disabled) under special education, allows the special ed lobby to trot out a severely disabled child for the press opportunity at budget time and then assign them to the usual rubber room. The mildly diabled can be helped because they are "mildly" disabled; the severely disabled may be beyond help in terms of functional normalcy.
Jean Gray

AOL

#12 May 27, 2008
This does not surprise me. Parents are actually the responsble one to make sure there child gets the education that they have a legal right to. Parents are also the one that will have to deal with the child once the education system finishes with their part of the childs life. The government continues to give the School Districts more and more dollars and still the public contiues to say that disabled students drain the system. If the public really wants to know these students get only a third of the education that non-disabled students recieve. If you look in the classrooms they have less than a regular ed classroom. If you look at there test scores I can asssure you that the progress that is made is far less than a non-disabled students. So until the Government does some real accountability of the IEP's, test scores, and the access to the regular ed cirriculum nothing will ever change.I have been a Advocate for 14 years and it does make me wonder with all of the money that is given to the schools, what happens to it. I would suggest that the Government get very serious for the accountablity of tax payer's dollars. The only way that is going to happen is for the government to go to the District's and compare students IEP's to the progress that the student is making. Quit comparing them to the non-disabled population, only when you can compare IEP's, progress and the services the student is getting can the government truly see if the money they are allocating is actually working. I see taking parents involvement another way for the district to be less accountable. The student is the one that pays for less always.
Jean Gray

AOL

#13 May 27, 2008
paulie wrote:
<quoted text>You have a cold and selfish soul.
I believe that you should investigate what you are saying. Ignorance is bliss and obviously by what you are saying you are not knowlegeble of the subject of which you speak
Worthless diplomas

United States

#14 May 27, 2008
I know of an LD student in the VA Beach system who earned a high school diploma, well, not exactly. It was some other type of piece of paper but whatever it was allowed the VA Beach school system to count the student as having graduated which enhances the district's graduation rate. That student never was able to earn a GED.
Richard Harris wrote:
<quoted text>
Twenty five years in education. Tell me, have you ever been in a classroom where they have mainstreamed the moderately/severely disabled students so the parents can be relieved of their genetic guilt. The destructive/disruptive impact is amazing. Now if you really feel for these children why don't you take one home during the school day to train them - see how long you last.
Public School Priorities

Lexington Park, MD

#15 May 27, 2008
The special needs children are concentrated on along with the brightest ones on the other end of the spectrum - the ones in the IB program and taking the AP courses. But the average and above average students are languishing and that's why these students do best in the private schools where they can reach their full potential as well.
parents of autistic chld

Virginia Beach, VA

#16 May 27, 2008
Day off - are you kidding me?? I wish! Both parents work full time, are not SSI moochers, we take our son to necessary therapy outside the school system - whatever it takes! We didn't ask or plan for our child to be autistic nor is his education a baby sitting service! You must be the guy that was giving our family cruel looks the other day at the store because you are so so clueless.
Richard Harris wrote:
There are true learning disabled - for which the taxpayer pays lavishly for baby sitting services while the parents have the day off and claim their child is normal - and there are the marginally learning disabled - speech problems, ADHD (drugs all day)- for whom a little extra goes along way. For the true learning disabled, what used to be the "monons" and "idiots", special ed provides baby sitting services. There are no studies to show that all of these years of bleeding the taxpayer so that the parents can have time off and claim their kid is normal, results in a functional adult. Special ed is an industry; a big business with its own lobby. So they fight any changes to the system because they lose money; the kids are not that important, employment is. Maybe if the parents accepted responsibility for raising their children at home we would not be throwing taxpayer resources into baby sitting services for the severely impaired. For the marginally impaired, the programs are a start.

“I pity the fool !!”

Since: Jan 08

Milford, VA

#17 May 27, 2008
Richard Harris wrote:
<quoted text>
Twenty five years in education. Tell me, have you ever been in a classroom where they have mainstreamed the moderately/severely disabled students so the parents can be relieved of their genetic guilt. The destructive/disruptive impact is amazing. Now if you really feel for these children why don't you take one home during the school day to train them - see how long you last.
I've lasted over 15 years, and still going (to include inclusion classes). And in a number of cases they (physically disabled and moderately mentally disabled) where able to perform and demonstrate their comprehension of material just as well as the regular ed students.

Thank God you are out of the classroom, but what happened to your being a retired businessman (high-middle manager) that you claimed in other threads.

You make gross assumptions about the parents of these students. It might just be possible that they're out working during the day, its known to happen.

You sit around judging others based on the most ignorant of reasons, outward appearance.

I'm sure whatever school system you worked for had a huge celebration the day you left the teaching profession.

“I pity the fool !!”

Since: Jan 08

Milford, VA

#18 May 27, 2008
Jean Gray wrote:
This does not surprise me. Parents are actually the responsble one to make sure there child gets the education that they have a legal right to. Parents are also the one that will have to deal with the child once the education system finishes with their part of the childs life. The government continues to give the School Districts more and more dollars and still the public contiues to say that disabled students drain the system. If the public really wants to know these students get only a third of the education that non-disabled students recieve. If you look in the classrooms they have less than a regular ed classroom. If you look at there test scores I can asssure you that the progress that is made is far less than a non-disabled students. So until the Government does some real accountability of the IEP's, test scores, and the access to the regular ed cirriculum nothing will ever change.I have been a Advocate for 14 years and it does make me wonder with all of the money that is given to the schools, what happens to it. I would suggest that the Government get very serious for the accountablity of tax payer's dollars. The only way that is going to happen is for the government to go to the District's and compare students IEP's to the progress that the student is making. Quit comparing them to the non-disabled population, only when you can compare IEP's, progress and the services the student is getting can the government truly see if the money they are allocating is actually working. I see taking parents involvement another way for the district to be less accountable. The student is the one that pays for less always.
You make a number of good points, especially about the need for parents to be involved to ensure their child receives the correct services.

However, as an advocate, you need to talk to the Professional Development Dept for your district. Many have begun a series of classes for SPED teachers to ensure that the goals they put in IEPs are meaningful and measurable. So when any parent goes in to an IEP they should review the previous goals, the means of measuring progress, their child's results and then establish new goals. This way the parent is an active participant in helping their child continue to develop.

Unfortunately, too many times its all glossed over and the future goals have been predetermined.
What the hay

United States

#19 May 27, 2008
Well i agree that there are children who need services but i also know there are parents who want services they don't need. I can name a few i know personally that have their kids in the system even though they don't need them. They give their kids a complex so they will stay the part so they will be given services even though they don't need them. Now developmently delayed children or retarded children those you can see on their face or how they act out right are different. But ADHD and ADD are just baloney. My brother had ADHD and my mother refused to treat him differently. She put him in reg. classes wouldn't medicate him and taught him how to cope with every day life. Parents think that these children are going to just stop being that way when they get out of school but it's just not true. They will always be that way they just need to be taught how to deal with it. My brother is VERY productive now and makes plenty of money and lives a good life. Because my mother did her part and her part was keeping the school as UNinvolved as she could.
1child-to help

Newport News, VA

#20 May 27, 2008
Parents have to be sure that this is not a way to phasing out special education programs. There are many children who need and thrive in the special classes. Parental involvment pay a pivoral rule in the child's planning. Believe me, this is nothing new. Before there was colloboration there was remediation and a lot of general education teacher did not welcome that change. We must be sure that today's curriculum are meeting the needs of the students. Teacher have a tendency not to stay in touch with their student's parent. There are too many things that need to be changed. Most of the textbooks are horrible and children are given worksheet galore. Let get back to some good basic teaching before we start to leave out parents.
Fed Up

United States

#21 May 28, 2008
Think 1st wrote:
<quoted text>
I've lasted over 15 years, and still going (to include inclusion classes). And in a number of cases they (physically disabled and moderately mentally disabled) where able to perform and demonstrate their comprehension of material just as well as the regular ed students.
Thank God you are out of the classroom, but what happened to your being a retired businessman (high-middle manager) that you claimed in other threads.
You make gross assumptions about the parents of these students. It might just be possible that they're out working during the day, its known to happen.
You sit around judging others based on the most ignorant of reasons, outward appearance.
I'm sure whatever school system you worked for had a huge celebration the day you left the teaching profession.
This "special education" need is nothing more than another gross ripoff of hard working taxpayers who not only have to provide for their own families now are expected to pay even more taxes to "educate" these mentally and physically handicapped kids who mostly will never contribute anything to our society except to drain education funds and disrupt normal childrens educations.

You apparently benefit financially and have a vested interest. Why don't you consider getting a real job instead of sponging of somebody else's earnings paid in taxes. But then again you probably arn't qualifed for a real job.
Merrick Maxwell

United States

#22 May 28, 2008
Richard Harris wrote:
There are true learning disabled - for which the taxpayer pays lavishly for baby sitting services while the parents have the day off and claim their child is normal - and there are the marginally learning disabled - speech problems, ADHD (drugs all day)- for whom a little extra goes along way. For the true learning disabled, what used to be the "monons" and "idiots", special ed provides baby sitting services. There are no studies to show that all of these years of bleeding the taxpayer so that the parents can have time off and claim their kid is normal, results in a functional adult. Special ed is an industry; a big business with its own lobby. So they fight any changes to the system because they lose money; the kids are not that important, employment is. Maybe if the parents accepted responsibility for raising their children at home we would not be throwing taxpayer resources into baby sitting services for the severely impaired. For the marginally impaired, the programs are a start.
You are so off base it is silly.
Did you ever think of the mental fatique on the care giver?
Lets hope you never have a stroke and stay stuck on "mentally challenged" living. Who are you going to depend on then? Adults/Children alike have issues that go on and on and on.......

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 41
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Norfolk Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Barack Obama, our next President (Nov '08) 4 min Onyango Obumbles 1,264,377
Flashing Boobs 1 hr Martin garey 2
Debate: Marijuana - Virginia Beach, VA (Aug '10) 1 hr facetats 122
News Once slow-moving threat, global warming speeds ... (Dec '08) 12 hr budd 54,341
Review: iLoveKickboxing - Chesapeake 16 hr JessicaH 16
News Hampton pastor's trip sparks interfaith dialogue 19 hr flame of truth 2
News Mathews County: Former state trooper accused of... (Jan '10) Jul 31 Moon Virginia 314
More from around the web

Personal Finance

Norfolk Mortgages